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George Washington Flowers 
Memorial Collection 

DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



ESTABLISHED BY THE 
FAMILY OF 

COLONEL FLOWERS 



Div.a 



NORTH CAROLINA 

BAPTIST 

ANNUAL 



ONE-HUNDRED-FIFTH 
YEAR 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
ASHEVILLE 



1935 






Annual 

of the 

North Carolina 
Baptist State Convention 

One-Hundred-Fifth Annual Session 



First Baptist Church 

Asheville 
November 12-14, 1935 



Edited by 

Charles B. Deane 

Recording Secretary 
Rockingham, N. C. 



The Next Session will be held 

November 10-12, 1936 
First Baptist Church, Durham 




ARCHIBALD JOHNSON 

To Whom This Volume of the Annual is Dedicated by 

Order of the Convention 

Born in Scotland (formerly Richmond County) North Carolina, August 29, 
1859, the son of Duncan and Catherine Livingston Johnson. Educated at Spring 
Hill Academy. Married Flora McNeill Johnson, January 28, 1885. Children: 
Mrs. Charles F. Lambeth, Gerald W. Johnson, Mrs. B. W. Parham. Mrs. William 
D. Webb, and Miss Lois Johnson. Following brief teaching and mercantile career 
entered newspaper field first as Editor of The Laurinburg Exchange and in early 
1895 founded The Red Springs Citizen. In September, 1895, he was called to 
Thomasville to become Editor of Charity and Children which post he occupied 
until his death which occurred at his home in Thomasville in the early morning 
of December 27, 1934. Buried at Riverton, Scotland County, in old Spring Hill 
Church Yard. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

SECTION PAGE 

Auditor's Report and Financial Statement 119 

Baptist Book Shop, executives of 2 

Baptist Foundation, directors of 3 

Baptist Hospital, trustees of 3 

Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina, trustees of 3 

Baptist Training Union, executives of 1 

Baptist World Alliance, executives of 8 

Benevolences, secretary of 2 

Berry, John D., In Memoriam facing 42, 63 

Biblical Recorder, directory of 6 

Campbell College, trustees of 4 

Charity and Children, directory of 7 

Chowan College, trustees of 4, 5 

Church Building Aid (110) 80 

Committees 

Baptist Men's Convention (22) 27 

Biblical Recorder, to' study (22) 26 

Committee on Committees (S) 20 

Convention, as to change of Annual Meeting (22) 27 

Enrollment (5) 19 

General Board, to report on report of (22) 25 

Historical Commission (22) 25 

Memorials (1936) (22) 26 

Needy, Aged, and Infirm (22) 26 

Order of Business, 1936 (22) 26 

Place and Preacher (22) 25 

Prisoners, to aid (22) 27 

Promotion and Enlistment (22) 27 

Publicity (.22) 26 

Resolutions (22) 25 

Social Service and Civic Righteousness (22) 26 

Trustees and Members General Board, to nominate (22) 26 

Constitution 9 

Amendment ( 74) 52 

Convention 

Directory 1 

Associational 126 

Historical Table 242 

Institutions 3,7 

Objectives (105) 72 

Officers, executives and administrative 1 

Officers, elected 

General Secretary ( 10 ) 22 

President (79) 55 

Recording Secretary (10) 22 

Vice-Presidents (79) 55 

Proceedings of (1) 19 

Sermon — Richard K. Redwine (16) 24 

Debt, Status of Convention (125) 102 

[Hi] 



9 z 4- 



Table of Contexts (Continued) 

SECTION PAGE 

Edwards, W. B., In Memoriam facing 24, 63 

Fuller, Ellis, Convention Speaker (100) 60 

General Board 

By Laws 14 

Officers and organizations 2 

Report (104) 72 

Greetings (30) 31 

Holcomb, T. L., Convention Speaker (67) 48 

Indian Work (Ill) 81 

Jenkins, Millard A., Convention Speaker (38) 35 

Johnson, Archibald, Annual Dedicated facing ii 

Jones, Mrs. Wesley N., recognition (50) 37 

Kennedy Home, Superintendent of 4 

Maddrey, Charles E., Convention Speaker (23) 29 

Mars Hill College, trustees of 5 

Meredith College, trustees of 5 

Messengers 65 

Mills Home, trustees of 3,4 

Ministers 

New Ministers recognized (11) 22 

Ordained, pastors 247 

Ordained, not pastors 261 

Ministerial Students 233 

Missionaries. North Carolina, on foreign field 237 

Negro Baptist, recognition (84) (112) 56, 81 

Oteen Mission (113) 82 

"Our Dead" 63 

Pastoral Assistance : (109) 80 

Pastors Circulating Library (115) 84 

Pastors' Conference 

Officers 1936 6 

Program 1935 64 

Pastors' Schools and Conferences (114) 83 

Powell, F. M., Convention Speaker (72) 51 

Reports 

Baptist Book Shop (131) 112 

Baptist Colleges 

General Statistics 101 

Baptist Foundation (21) (133) 25, 113 

Baptist Hospital (31) (128) 34, 107 

Baptist Training Union (118) 93 

Biblical Recorder (14) 23 

Campbell College (42) (124) 35, 100 

Chowan College (42) (122) 35, 99 

Committees on Committees (22) 25 

Congress, to memorialize (54) 40 

Co-operative Program (70) (129) 50, 108 

Co-operative and Promotion Plans (70) (130) 50, 109 

Debt Status (125) 102 

Education (42) (120) 35, 98 

Enrollment (93) 58 

General Board 

Committee, to report on report of (68) 48 

Huggins, Maloy A., Report General Secretary (12) 23 

Meetings ( 106) 74 

[iv] 



Table of Contents (Continued) 

SEC.TION PAGE 

Objectives (105) 72 

Recommendations (134) 116 

Historical Commission (96) ( 132) 50, 112 

Laymens Convention (66) 47 

Mars Hill College (42) (129) 35, 99 

Memorials (98) 59 

Meredith College (42) (121) 35, 98 

Missions, department of 

Foreign (23) (107) 29, 78 

Home (100) (107) 60, 78 

State (83) (108) 55, 79 

North Carolina Baptist Orphanage (28) (127) 31, 105 

Order of Business 1935 (9) 20 

Place and Preacher (95) 59 

Publicity (94) 58 

Resolutions Committee (91) 57 

Relief and Annuity (37) (126) 34, 102 

Seminaries 

Baptist Bible Institute, New Orleans, La (85) 56 

S'outhern Baptist Theological, Louisville, Ky (85) 56 

Southwestern Seminary, Hill, Texas (3i) 34 

Social S'ervice and Civic Righteousness (55) 41 

Student Work (119) 95 

Sunday School (117) 85 

Trustees and Members General Board, to nominate (78) 52 

Method of Election (74) 51 

Trustees of Convention (99) 60 

Wake Forest College (42) (120) 35, 98 

Woman's Missionary Union (50) (135) 37, 117 

Resolutions Offered 

In Re Baptist Belief and Doctrine (64) 46 

In Re Baptist Foundation Directors (52) 39 

In Re Baptist Hospital (48) 36 

In Re Constitutional Changes (80) 55 

In Re Intoxicating Liquors (56) 44 

Jones, Mrs. Wesley N (50) 37 

Woman's Missionary Union (50) 37 

Ridgecrest, directory of 7 

Southern Baptist Convention, directory of 7, S 

Statistical Data 

Associational 126 

Recapitulation 228 

General Church Activities 230 

Statistical Summary 238 

Southern Baptist Associations, 1935 246 

Woman's Missionary Union 241 

Student Secretary 1 

Sunday School, Executives of 1 

Visitors recognized (7) (35) 20,34 

Names 70 

Wake Forest College, trustees of 6 

Woman's Missionary Union 

Directory 241 

Executives 1 

Fifty Years S'ervice, recognition (50) 38 

M 



31.14-5 i>U 



DIRECTORY OF THE CONVENTION 

I. EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

Zeno Wall, Shelby President 

John T. Coley, Rocky Mount Vice-President 

W. D. Poe, Oxford Vice-President 

B. E. Morris, West Durham Vice-President 

Maloy A. Huggins, Raleigh General Secretary and Treasurer 

Charles B. Deane, Rockingham Recording Secretary 

Perry Morgan, Raleigh Statistical Secretary 

R. L. McMillan, Raleigh Trustee 

Wm. Louis Poteat, Wake Forest Trustee 

F. H. Brooks, Smithfield Trustee 

II. OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Headquarters: 200-216 Biblical Recorder Building, Raleigh, N. C. 

Maloy A. Huggins, Raleigh General Secretary and Treasurer 

Miss Margie Murchison, Raleigh Office Secretary 

Miss Esther Ivey, Raleigh Bookkeeper 

Miss Margie Murchison, Raleigh Bookkeeper Debt Service Fund 

DEPARTMENT OF SUNDAY SCHOOL 

Perry Morgan, Raleigh Secretary 

Miss Bessie Morgan, Raleigh Office Secretary 

Leonard L. Morgan, Raleigh Field Worker 

DEPARTMENT OF BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 

Miss Winnie Rickett, Raleigh ; Secretary 

Mrs. J. E. Tharrington, Raleigh Office Secretary 

Miss Mabel Starnes, Raleigh Field Worker 

DEPARTMENT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Mrs. Wesley X. Jones, Raleigh President 

Mrs. Edna R. Harris, Raleigh Corresponding Secretary 

Miss Elsie K. Hunter, Raleigh Treasurer 

Miss Ora Alford, Raleigh Office Secretary 

Miss Mary Currin, Raleigh Young People's Leader 

DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Miss Cleo Mitchell, Greensboro Student Secretary 

[1] 



2 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

DEPARTMENT OF BENEVOLENCES 

R. T. Vann, Raleigh Secretary 

BAPTIST book shop 

Mrs. Roger P. Marshall, Raleigh Manager 

Miss Margaret Burch, Raleigh Stenographer 

Miss Mary Ayscue, Raleigh Assistant Stenographer 

III. THE GENERAL BOARD AND ORGANIZATIONS 

B. E. Morris, President West Durham 

J. B. Willis, Vice-President Hamlet 

Charles B. Deane, Secretary Rockingham 

Term Expiring 1936— J. Powell Tucker, Raleigh; J. Ben Eller, Statesville; 
F. C. Feezor, Raleigh; R. P. Noble, Raleigh; Vance Browning, Bryson City; Hugh 
A. Ellis, Wilson; B. E. Morris, West Durham; R. E. Hardaway, Lenoir; Arch C. 
Cree, Salisbury; J. T. J. Battle, Greensboro; C. W. Durden, Charlotte; S. F. 
Teague, Goldsboro; J. A. Snow, Wingate; Win, Harrison Williams, Charlotte; 
Mrs. J. O. Gough, Wake Forest; A. V. West, Mount Airy; Zeno Wall, Shelby; 
ex-officio; C. B. Deane, Rockingham, ex-officio. 

Term Expiring 1937 — Mrs. J. T. Alderman, Henderson; Clarence A. Smith, 
High Point; J. W. Kincheloe, Rocky Mount; M. L. Barnes, Mount Holly; J. C. 
Canipe, Boone; E. N. Johnson, Mount Olive; R. J. Hall, Bladenboro; D. H. Wilcox, 
Winston-Salem; J. M. Kester, Wilmington; Mrs. R. L. Wilburn, Roxboro; E. H. 
Potts, Elizabeth City; W. O. Rosser, Smithfield; Oscar Creech, Ahoskie; J. A. 
Brock, Caroleen; R. K. Redwine, Hickory; E. N. Gardner, Dunn. 

Term Expiring 1938— John W. Suttle, Shelby; Trela D. Collins, Durham; Mrs. 
C. D. Bain, Dunn; J. B. Grice, West Asheville; J. B. Willis, Hamlet; A. P. 
Stephens, Morehead City; J. R. Morgan, Waynesville; J. H. Highsmith, Raleigh; 
J. E. Kirk, Roanoke Rapids; W. D. Poe, Oxford; E. Gibson Davis, Asheville; 
Clifton J. Allen, Fairmont; Paul P. Davis, Yadkinville; A. H. Casey, North Wilkes- 
boro; Roy D. Campbell, Wing; A. B. Wood, Maxton. 

Executive Committee: J. H. Highsmith, J. Powell Tucker, W. D. Poe, E. N. 
Gardner, Trela D. Collins, F. C. Feezor, B. E. Morris, ex-officio. 

1. Commission on Missions: J. Powell Tucker, Chairman, R. K. Redwine, 
Secretary, J. E. Kirk, Wm. Harrison Williams, J. M. Kester, J. R. Morgan, B. E. 
Morris, Mrs. R. L. Wilburn, A. P. Stephens, Arch C. Cree, C. W. Durden, Oscar 
Creech, A. B. Wood, S. F. Teague. 

2. Committee on Training Activities: W. D. Poe, Chairman, Mrs. C. D. Bain, 
Secretary, J. C. Canipe, E. N. Johnson, M. L. Barnes, J. Ben Eller, F. C. Feezor, 
J. A. Brock, E. H. Potts, R. D. Campbell, Vance Browning. 

3. Commission on Education: J. H. Highsmith, Chairman, Trela D. Collins, 
Secretary, Mrs. Jno. O. Gough, J. B. Grice, E. Gibson Davis, J. B. Willis, J. T. 
J. Battle, Paul P. Davis, J. A. Snow, Mrs. J. T. Alderman, A. H. Casey, R. P. 
Noble. 

4. Commission on Benevolences : E. N. Gardner, Chairman, Clifton J. Allen, 
Secretary, R. J. Hall, R. E. Hardaway, J. W. Kincheloe, Clarence A. Smith, A. V. 
West, J. W. S'uttle, W. O. Rosser, Hugh A. Ellis, D. H. Wilcox. 



Annual of Session 1935 3 

IV. INSTITUTIONS OF THE CONVENTION 

Note. In collaboration with George W. Paschal, Baptist Historian, and the In- 
stitutional Heads, the Recording Secretary in 1933 established the Historical Data 
that appears under the names of the Institutions and Colleges that follow. 

BAPTIST FOUNDATION 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention November 12, 1919. 

Organized December IS, 1919. 

First meeting of Directors November 17, 1920. 

Z. M. Caveness, Chairman, Raleigh 

T. S. Johnson, Secretary, Raleigh 

Term Expiring 1936 — Z. M. Caveness, Raleigh; Irvin Carlyle, Winston-Salem; 
Luther Little, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring- 1937 — J. L. Peacock, Tarboro; Bruce Benton, Rockingham; 
Oscar Haywood, New Bern. 

Term Expiring 1938 — Carl V. Tyner, Leaks ville; J. R. Morgan, Waynesville ; 
A. J. Smith, Goldsboro. 

Term Expiring 1939 — J. D. Wilkins, Greensboro; Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh; 
E. M. Johnson, Lumberton. 

Term Expiring 1940— T. S. Johnson, Raleigh; Mrs. J. B. Spilman, Greenville; 
Mrs. Paul P. Davis, Yadkinville. 

BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention November 17, 1920. 

Chartered December 27, 1922. 

Began Operations May 28, 1923. 

Smith Hagaman, Superintendent, Winston-Salem 

Board of Trustees 

E. L. Davis, President, Winston-Salem 

Term Expiring 1936— Thurman D. Kitchin, Wake Forest; T. W. Blackwell, 
Winston-Salem; B. F. Bray, Marion. 

Term Expiring 1937 — W. M. Johnson, Winston-Salem; Grover H. Jones, High 
Point; A. Wayland Cooke, Greensboro. 

Term Expiring 1938— A. H. Eller, Winston-Salem; J. Wilbur Crews, Winston- 
Salem; E. L. Davis, Winston-S'alem. 

Term Expiring 1939— Mrs. Ruth Roddick, Winston -.Salem; Mrs. J. F. Lethco, 
Charlotte; Fielding Combs, Winston-Salem. 

BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

MILLS HOME 

General Managership began January 12, 1885. 

First orphan, Mary Presson, received November 11, 1885. 

I. G. Greer, General Superintendent, Thomasville. 



4 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

KENNEDY HOME BRANCH 

Transfer of property April 26, 1912 

First group admitted June S, 1914. 

J. C. Hough, Superintendent, Kinston 

Board of Trustees 

B. W. Spilman, Chairman, Kinston 

Term Expiring 1936— Zeno Wall, Shelby; H. S. Stokes, Winston-S'alem ; Mrs. 
Byron C. S'cott, Charlotte; Robert A. Mclntyre, Lumberton; Glenn Choate, Salis- 
bury. 

Term Expiring 1937— Charles Shields, Scotland Neck; J. W. Noell, Roxboro; 
T. H. Broyhill, Lenoir; J. B. Stroud, Greensboro; A. E. Tate, High Point. 

Term Expiring 1938 — F. B. Hamrick, Raleigh; J. H. Canaday, Kinston; John 
T. Coley, Rocky Mount; R. L. Moore, Mars Hill. 

Term Expiring 1939— B. W. Spilman, Kinston; C. L. Haywood, Durham; T. P. 
Pruitt, Hickory; Mrs. Fannie Moore, Gastonia. 

V. TRUSTEES OF VARIOUS COLLEGES 

CAMPBELL COLLEGE 

Opened at Buie's Creek Academy January 5, 1887. 

Became Buie's Creek Junior College August 31, 1926. 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention to become Campbell College 

December 17, 1926. 

New Charter Campbell College Adopted by Trustees April 7, 1927. 

Leslie H. Campbell, President, Buie's Creek 

Board of Trustees 

B. F. McLeod, Chairman, Buie's Creek 

Term Expiring 1936 — Santford Martin, Winston-Salem; Miss Mattie Bain, 
Coats; D. H. Senter, Chalybeate Springs; W. H. Upchurch, Oxford; D. R. Perry, 
Durham. 

Term Expiring 1937— S. F. Teague, Goldsboro; G. F. Pope Dunn; W. M. 
Morgan, Angier; H. M. Holleman, Asheville; H. B. Taylor, Dunn. 

Term Expiring 1938— B. F. McLeod, Buie's Creek; B. Townsend, Rockfish; 
W. S. Strickland, Dunn; B. P. G entr y> Lillington; J. E. Lanier, Wallace. 

Term Expiring 1939 — John W. Holmes, Farmville; Fred N. Day, Winston- 
Salem; R. B. Wilkins, Durham; R. M. Olive, Fayetteville ; A. P. Stephens, More- 
head City. 

CHOWAN COLLEGE 

Founded and opened for students as Chowan Female Institute 

October 11, 1848. 

First called Chowan Female College Institute in 1851. 

First called Chowan Baptist Female Institute in 1868. 

Became Chowan College May 17, 1910. 

*Roy R. McCullock, President, Murfreesboro 



* Former President Ward Blowers Edwards died September 5, 1935. 



Annual of Session 1935 5 

Board of Trustees 

J. H. Matthews, President, Windsor 

Term Expiring 1936 — Mrs. R. P. Morehead; Weldon; D. P. Harris, Louisburg; 
P. J. Long, Jackson; W. D. Boone, Winton; B. H. Ward, Sunbury. 

Term Expiring 1937 — W. J. Rountree, Hobbsville; Mrs. W. M. Hollowell, 
Hobbsville; W. Harry Stephenson, Pendleton; J. H. Stephenson, Pendleton; J. H. 
Holmes, Farmville. 

Term Expiring 1938 — J. H. Matthews, Windsor; G. W. Paschal, Wake Forest; 
D. P. Medlin, South Mills; J. T. Bolton, Rich Square; S. P. Winborne, Como. 

Term Expiring 1939 — J. P. Holoman, Weldon; W. L. Curtis, Ahoskie; Wayland 
Mitchell, Lewiston; J. M. Duncan, Murfreesboro; E. L. Wells, Edenton. 

MARS HILL COLLEGE 

First Commencement or Exhibition as French Broad Baptist Institute 

July 4, 1857. 

Chartered Mars Hill College February 16, 1859. 

Opened as Mars Hill Junior College August 14, 1922. 

R. L. Moore, President, Mars Hill. 

Board of Trustees 

J. B. Grice, President, West Asheville. 

Term Expiring 1936 — R. T. Teague, Newland; W. H. Wray, Gastonia; W. L. 
Griggs, Charlotte; E. F. Watson, Burnsville; H. Fields Young, Shelby; J. B. 
Efird, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1937— J. Ben Filer, Statesville; D. C. Bryson, Sylva; N. S. 
Whitaker, Mars Hill; C. E. Blackstock, Asheville; W. R. Chambers, Marion; 
Grover H. Jones, High Point; J. R. Morgan, Waynesville. 

Term Expiring 1938— Julian A. Glazener, Brevard; R. S. Gibbs. Mars Hill; 
A. W. Whitehurst, Marshall; W. C. McConnell, Asheville; Robert O. Huffman, 
Morganton; O. D. Revell, Asheville. 

Term Expiring 1939 — J. R. Owen. Asheville; Mrs. W. E. Logan, West Ashe- 
ville; J. B. Grice, West Asheville; J. R. Sams, Mars Hill; Thos. L. Johnson, 
Asheville; W. H. Hipps, Asheville; R. K. Redwine, Hickory. 

MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Incorporated as Baptist Female University of North Carolina February 27, 1891. 

Opened for Students September 27, 1899. 

By Legislative enactment became Baptist University for Women January 20, 1905. 

Became Meredith College by Legislative enactment January 24, 1911. 

Charles E. Brewer, President, Raleigh 

Board of Trustees 

J. R. Hunter, President, Raleigh 

Term Expiring 1936 — Mrs. Foy Johnson Farmer, Raleigh; Z. M. Caveness, Ra- 
leigh; Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte; J. Y. Joyner, Raleigh; D. H. Penton, 
Wilmington; Mrs. Anna Kitchin Josey, Scotland Neck. 

Term Expiring 1937— L. R. Varser, Lumberton; W. Q. Riddick, Azalea; R. H. 
Riggsbee, Durham; R. N. Simms, Raleigh; W. A. Thomas, Statesville; B. A. 
Bowers, Gastonia. 



6 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Term Expiring: 1938 — Mrs. Ruby McK. Barrett, Laurinburg; Mrs. Margaret 
Shields Everett, Greenville; E. McK. Goodwin, Morganton; J. R. Hunter, Raleigh; 
Mrs. Lily Morehead Mebane, Spray; J. D. Boushall, Raleigh. 

Term Expiring 1939 — T. A. Avera, Rocky Mount; Oscar Creech, Ahoskie; 
W. H. Weatherspoon, Raleigh; Win. L. Poteat, Wake Forest; Mrs. Maude Davis 
Bunn, Raleigh; W. D. Poe, Oxford; J. T. J. Battle, Greensboro. 

WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Opened as Wake Forest Institute February 3, 1S34. 

Chartered as Wake Forest College December 28. 1838. 

Thurman D. Kitchin, President, Wake Forest 

Board of Trustees 

Claude Gore, President, Rockingham. 

Term Expiring 1936 — Johnson J. Hayes, Greensboro; A. J. Hutchins, Canton; 
John A. Oates, Fayetteville; Herbert Peele, Elizabeth City; J. Clyde Turner, 
Greensboro; A. D. Ward, New Bern; B. M. Watkins, Durham; J. C. Watkins, 
Winston-Salem; J. B. Willis, Hamlet; W. L. Wyatt, Raleigh. 

Term Expiring 1937 — Charles B. Deane, Rockingham; Eugene I. Olive, North 
Wilkesboro; W. J. Conrad, Winston-Salem; Claude Gore, Rockingham; E. B. Josey, 
Wilmington; G. E. Lineberry, Raleigh; W. Reid Martin, Raleigh; C. Ray Sharpe, 
Lexington; C. N. Peeler, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1938 — J. E. Allen, Warrenton; A. Y. Arledge, Hendersonville; 
J. M. Broughton, Raleigh; H. T. Hunter, Cullowhee; W. M. Johnson, Winston- 
Salem; T. H. King, Clinton; Leland Kitchin, Scotland Neck; R. T. Yann, Raleigh; 
E. Y. Webb, Shelby, 

Term Expiring 1939 — C. O. Bridger, Bladenboro; C. H. Durham, Lumberton; 
Germain Bernard, Durham; F. P. Hobgood, Greensboro; G. A. Norwood, Golds- 
boro; J. Bivens Helms. Morganton; R. E. Royall, Wake Forest; John Arch Mc- 
Millan, Thomasville. 

VI. OFFICERS BAPTIST PASTORS' CONFERENCE 

Officers for 1935 

Henry B. Anderson, President, Durham 

J. Lewis Price, Vice-President, Siler City 

Trela D. Collins, Secretary, Durham 

VII. STANDING COMMITTEES 

(SEE PAGE 25) 

VIII. NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST PRESS 

1. Biblical Recorder, Raleigh, N. C. 

Published every Wednesday by the Biblical Recorder Publishing Company, 

N. A. Dunn, President Board of Directors. 
Founded 1833 — Incorporated 1901. 

J. S. Farmer, Editor and Business Manager. 



Annual of Session 1935 7 

The paper was founded by Thomas Meredith in Edenton in 1833, moved to 
New Bern in 1835, then to Raleigh in 1838. Publication was suspended in 
1841, but resumed in 1843. Mr. Meredith died in 1851. 

Editors, succeeding Mr. Meredith, have been as follows: T. W. Tobey, 1851-53; 
J. J. James, 1854-61; J. D. Hufham, 1861-67; J. H. Mills. 1867-73; A. F. 
Redd and J. D. Hufham, 1873-74; C. T. Bailey, 1875-95; J. W. Bailey, 1895- 
1907; C. W. Blanchard, 1907; Hight C. Moore, 1907-17; Livingston John- 
son, 1917-31; J. S. Farmer, 1931- 

Circulation, 10,600. Price $2.00 a year. 

Organ of the Baptist State Convention. 

Charity and Children, Thomasville, N. C. 

Published each week by the trustees of the Mills Home, Inc., (formerly Thomas- 
ville Baptist Orphanage) B. W. Spilman (Kinston, N. C.) President. 

Established 1887. Circulation: 29,671; Price $1.00 a year. 

John Arch McMillan, Editor; I. G. Greer, General Superintendent; R. D. 
Covington, Treasurer. 

Orphanage organ of the Baptists of North Carolina. 



IX. RIDGECREST 

Chartered March 1907. 
Southern Baptist Convention Assembly Grounds, Ridgecrest, North Carolina. 

GOVERNING BOARD 

Executive Committee Southern Baptist Convention 

Austin Crouch, Executive Secretary, Nashville, Tenn. 

R. F. Staples, Manager, Ridgecrest. 

T. L. Holcomb, Chairman Program Committee 1936, Nashville, Tenn. 

DIRECTORY OF THE SOUTHERN BAPTIST 
CONVENTION 

The Convention was organized May 8, 1845, and held its first meeting in 
Augusta, Ga. 

The last session was held in Memphis, Tenn. 

The next session will be held in St. Louis, Missouri, May 20, 1936. 

Officers of the Convention: 

President : John R. Sampey, Louisville, Kentucky. 

Vice-Presidents: Frank Tripp, St. Joseph, Mo.; J. R. Hobbs, Birmingham, Ala. 

Secretaries: Hight C. Moore, Nashville, Tenn.; J. Henry Burnett, Macon, Ga. 

Boards of the Convention: 

Foreign Mission Board, Richmond, Va., Charles E. Maddry, Executive Secretary. 
North Carolina member: J. M. Kester, Wilmington. 

Home Mission Board, Atlanta, Ga.; J. B. Lawrence, Executive Secretary-Treas- 
urer. North Carolina member: Ira D. S'. Knight, Durham. 



8 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Sunday School Board, Nashville, Tenn., T. L. Holcomb, Executive Secretary. 

North Carolina member: B. A. Bowers, Gastonia. 
Relief and Annuity Board, Dallas, Texas, T. J. Watts, Executive Secretary. 

North Carolina member : Joel S. Snyder, Fayetteville. 

Institutions of the Convention : 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, John R. Sampey, President, Louisville, 

Ky. North Carolina members of Board of Trustees: J. Clyde Turner, 

Greensboro; C. H. Durham, Lumberton; W. J. Berryman, Edenton. 
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, L. R. Scarborough, President, 

Seminary Hill, Texas. North Carolina member of Board of Trustees: A. 

P. Stephens, Morehead City. 
Baptist Bible Institute, W. W. Hamilton, President, New Orleans, La. North 

Carolina member of Board of Trustees: Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro. 
American Baptist Theological Seminary: E. F. Aldredge, Acting Executive 

Secretary, Nashville, Tenn. North Carolina member of Board of Directors : 

A. J. Barton, Wilmington. 
Education Commission. North Carolina member: W. R. Cullom, Wake Forest. 
Hospital Commission (New Orleans, La.). North Carolina member: S. H. Tem- 

pleman, Winston-Salem. 
Social Service Commission, A. J. Barton, Wilmington, N. C. North Carolina 

member: W. L. Poteat, Wake Forest. 

Standing Committees of the Convention: 

Baptist Brotherhood of the South, J. T. Henderson, General Secretary, Knoxville, 
Tenn. North Carolina member: Johnson J. Hayes, Greensboro. 

Executive Committee, Austin Crouch, Executive Secretary, Nashville, Tenn. 
North Carolina member: J. Powell Tucker, Raleigh; Wm. Harrison Williams, 
Charlotte. 

Special Committees of the Convention: 

Advisability of creating an Agency of Social Research: E. McNeill Poteat, 

Chairman, Raleigh; John Arch McMillan, Thomasville. 
Baptist Papers: W. K. McGee, Burlington. 
. On Boards: Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh. 
Roger Williams Tercentenary, E. McNeill Poteat, Raleigh. 

Officers of the Woman's Missionary Union: 

Organized May 14, 1888, as auxiliary to the Southern Baptist Convention. 
Headquarters, Birmingham, Alabama. Miss Kathleen Mallory, Correspond- 
ing Secretary. North Carolina Vice-President, Mrs. Wesley N. Jones. 

BAPTIST WORLD ALLIANCE 

First Session, London, July 10-17, 1905. 

George W. Truett, President, Dallas, Texas. 

J. H. Ruskbroke, General Secretary, 4 Southampton Row, London, England, 

Next meeting: 1939, Atlanta, Georgia, U. S. A. 



CONSTITUTION 

I. NAME AND OBJECT 

Section I. This body shall b» known as the Baptist State Convention 
of North Carolina. 

The object of the Convention shall be to promote Missions, Educa- 
tion, Social Service, the distribution and study of the Bible and sound 
religious literature : and to co-operate with the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention in its work. 

II. MEMBERSHIP 

Sectiox 1. The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina shall 
be composed of not more than three representatives from each white 
association in the State and not more than one representative from 
each co-operating church for every fifty members or fraction thereof 
and of the officers and members of the General Board of the Conven- 
tion and of the Life Members so declared under the previous Constitu- 
tion : Provided, that no church have more than ten representatives and 
no one shall be a member of the Convention who is not a member in 
good standing of a Missionary Baptist Church co-operating with the Con- 
vention. 

~~ III. MEETINGS 

Section 1. The Convention shall meet annually on Tuesday after 
the second Sunday in November. 

IV. OFFICERS 

Section 1. The officers of the Convention shall be a President, 
three Vice-Presidents, a Recording Secretary, a General Secretary, a 
Treasurer (the General Secretary may be elected as Treasurer at the 
discretion of the Convention), three Trustees of the Convention, and five 
Directors of the North Carolina Baptist Foundation. The President, 
Vice-Presidents, Recording Secretary, General Secretary, and Treasurer 
shall be elected as the Convention may determine, the Trustees of the 
Convention and Directors of the Baptist Foundation, in the manner pro- 
vided by their respective charters. The terms of office of President and 
Vice-Presidents commence at the conclusion of the session at which they 
are elected and continue until the close of the next Convention. 

Sec. 2. The President shall preside over the deliberations of the 
Convention and discharge such other duties as are imposed upon him 
by the Convention or as are incumbent on the presiding officer of a 
deliberative body. He shall appoint all Committees unless the Conven- 

[9] 



10 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

tion shall otherwise direct. In case of his absence or incapacity one of 
the Vice-Presidents shall act in his stead. 

Sec. 3. The Recording Secretary shall record and preserve the pro- 
ceedings of the Convention and have the same printed and distributed. 

Seg. 4. The General Secretary of the Convention shall have ad- 
ministrative supervision of the work ftf Missions, Education, Benev- 
olences, and all other general training activities of the Convention. He 
shall employ a reputable auditor or firm of auditors each year to make 
a complete audit of the books and accounts of the treasurer and book- 
keeping department and report to the Executive Committee of the Gen- 
eral Board, which shall receive and pass upon said report and have it 
published in the minutes of the Convention and in the Biblical Recorder 
or the then recognized denominational organ. 

Sec. 5. The Treasurer shall receive all funds sent to him for the 
objects of the Convention, make acknowledgment of the same once a 
month in the Biblical Recorder or the then recognized denominational 
organ, give a bond to the Trustees of the Convention in such amount as 
they may determine for the faithful performance of his duties and pre- 
scribe the terms and conditions of said bond. He shall also forward 
at least once a month all contributions to their destination; at every 
meeting of the Convention he shall make a full report of his receipts 
and disbursements, and upon retiring from his office, deliver to his suc- 
cessor all moneys, papers, books and other property belonging thereto. 

Sec. 6. The Trustees shall take and hold the title to any and all 
property acquired by and belonging to the Convention. They shall re- 
quire a sufficient bond from the Treasurer. In case he shall refuse or 
neglect to give satisfactory bond within thirty days after his election 
the Trustees shall have power to elect a successor. The said Trustees 
shall elect a chairman and secretary and report annually to the Conven- 
tion the work done by them. They shall receive and make such convey- 
ances of the properties of the Convention as directed by the Convention. 
During the interim between sessions of the Convention the said Trustees 
may receive and convey the property of the Convention upon the advice 
and direction of the General Board. 

V. GENERAL BOARD 

Section 1. The General Board of the Convention shall consist of 
the President and Recording Secretary of the Convention, ex officio, 
and forty-eight members from the State at large. The Convention shall 
elect one-third of the members from the State at large to hold office for 
one year, one-third for two years, and one-third for three years, but as 
the terms expire the successors shall serve for terms of three years. 
* That retiring members of the Board be ineligible for re-election until 

* Amendment passed 1935 Convention (See page 52, section 74). 



Annual of Session 1935 11 

the following meeting of the State Convention. No one in the em- 
ployment for pay of any Institution or Board fostered by this Con- 
vention shall be eligible to membership on this Board. The General 
Board shall fill all vacancies in its membership between the session 
of the Convention until the session of the next Convention, when 
the vacancies shall be filled by the Convention itself in the manner pro- 
vided by its laws. 

Sec. 2. The General Board shall have charge and control, except 
when otherwise directed by the Convention, of all work of the Conven- 
tion, including Missions, Education, Benevolences, and all other general 
activities, in the interim between the sessions of the Convention. Any 
action by the General Board during the interim between the sessions of 
the Convention vitally related to the work of the Convention shall be 
binding upon the Convention : Provided, it shall not relate to any matter 
previously committed to some other agency of the Convention with power 
to act. But any action of the Board during the interim shall be reported 
fully to the Convention at its next session. 

Sec. 3. The General Board shall report to each session of the Con- 
vention upon the work done in each department, viz. : Missions, Educa- 
tion, Benevolences and all other general activities. The Board shall 
have its report printed and ready for distribution at the first session of 
the Convention; all reports from Educational Institutions, Hospitals, Or- 
phanages, Baptist Foundation, and all other institutions or agencies of 
the Convention shall report to the Convention through the General 
Board. 

Sec. 4. The General Board of the Convention shall meet in regular 
session in December and June of each year, and in cases of emergency 
at the call of the President and General Secretary of the Board or any 
five members. 

Sec. 5. At the first December meeting of the General Board the 
work of the Convention shall be divided as follows : Missions, Educa- 
tion, Benevolences and Training Activities. The membership of the 
General Board shall be divided into four committees of twelve each and 
the work as above outlined shall be assigned to these committees. Each 
committee shall organize itself by the selection of a chairman and a re- 
cording secretary. All appropriations for the work of the various depart- 
ments of the General Board shall be made by the General Board; but 
each committee shall make to the General Board definite and specific 
recommendations as to all appropriations. 

Sec. 6. The General Board shall select an Executive Committee 
consisting of the Chairman of the Committees on Missions, Education, 
Benevolences and Training Activities, the President of the General 
Board, and two other members of the General Board. The Executive 



12 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Committee shall meet at the call of the General Secretary and shall 
have general direction and oversight of all the work of the General 
Board in the interim between the sessions of the Board and such other 
matters as shall be assigned to it by the General Board. 

Sec. 7. The General Board shall be successor in law to all legal 
obligations heretofore incurred by the Board of Missions and by the 
Board of Education. 

Sec. 8. At each December meeting the General Board may select 
such other departmental assistants as may be needed. 

VI. TRUSTEES OF CONVENTION'S INSTITUTION 

Section 1. The charters of all institutions owned and supported by 
the Convention shall contain the following provisions as nearly as may 
be and conformable to the number of trustees to be elected, that is to 
say: 

a. The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina shall elect 
the trustees of said corporation and their regular term of office 
shall be four years. At the first election by the Convention one- 
fourth of the board of trustees shall be elected to serve for one 
year, one-fourth for two years, one-fourth for three years and the 
remaining one-fourth for four years. At each subsequent regular 
annual session of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
one-fourth of the members of the Board of Trustees of said cor- 
poration shall be elected by the Convention to succeed the members 
of said Board retiring. 

b. The members of the Board of Trustees of said corporation 
shall be residents of the State of North Carolina and members in 
good and regular standing of a Missionary Baptist Church co-opera- 
ting with the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina. 

c. Removal from the State or ceasing for any reason to be a 
member in good and regular standing of a Missionary Baptist 
Church co-operating with the Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina shall be equivalent to a resignation from said Board of 
Trustees. Any vacancy on the Board shall be filled by the remain- 
ing members until the next regular annual session of the Convention 
and the Convention shall at its next regular annual session fill the 
vacancy for the unexpired term. 

d. The term of office of a trustee who has not resigned, died, 
become disqualified, or been removed shall not expire until his 
successor shall have been duly elected and qualified. 

e. The Board of Trustees of said corporation by the affirmative 
vote of three-fourths of its entire membership, given in regular 
annual meeting or in a special meeting duly called for the purpose, 



Annual of Session 1935 13 

shall have power to remove from office any trustee of such cor- 
poration for cause considered sufficient by such Board, but only 
after reasonable notice to such trustee and opportunity to him to be 
heard by the Board. 

f. The Baptist State Convention shall have the right at any time 
to remove from office any trustee for cause considered sufficient by 
the Convention, but only after reasonable notice to such trustee and 
opportunity for him to be heard by the Convention. Notice of such 
contemplated action and hearing by the Convention may be given 
by the Executive Committee of the Convention. 

Sec. 2. The Trustees of all institutions, benevolent, educational or 
otherwise under the control of the Convention shall be elected by the 
Baptist State Convention of North Carolina and shall hold office for the 
term to which elected, unless sooner terminated. When any vacancy 
shall occur in any Board of any such institution a nominating committee 
elected by the Convention shall nominate to the Convention Baptists to 
fill such vacancy. The Trustees of all institutions owned and supported 
by the Convention shall make annual report to the nominating com- 
mittee of any vacancies. Each Board shall have the right to make any 
suggestion to the nominating committee it may see fit regarding such 
nominations, and all nominations made by the committee shall be passed 
upon by the Convention. The Convention shall have the right to adopt the 
report of the nominating committee and elect the trustees thus nom- 
inated, or to substitute the name of other trustee or trustees in lieu 
thereof, or recommit said report for further consideration as the case 
may be. 

VII. GENERAL ITEMS 

Section 1. Individuals, churches, and associations, or others desiring 
the assistance and co-operation of the Baptists of the State in any work 
not already fostered by the Convention should present the question to 
the agency under which it should be properly placed. If the agency 
should refuse to take it up, it may be presented to the Convention under 
miscellaneous business or a special order. 

Sec. 2. The members of the Boards of the Convention and Institu- 
tions affiliated with the Convention shall be distributed as widely as 
p-acticable, both as to territory and individuals. 

Sec. 3. The Convention year shall close December 31 of each year. 

Sec. 4. The compensation of all paid officers and employees of the 
Convention, the General Board, and its committees shall be fixed by the 
Executive Committee subject to review by the General Board at its next 
meeting. 

Sec. S. No institution or agency affiliating with the Convention shall 



14 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

encumber its property or change its status with respect to the Conven- 
tion without authority of the Convention or its General Board. 

That except as may be necessary in the reasonable anticipation of 
current revenues and payable out of the same, or for the purpose of 
funding or refinancing any indebtedness of the Convention now outstand- 
ing, neither the Convention, nor its General Board shall have the power 
to create any debt or obligation binding on the Convention ; and no other 
board, agency or institution of, or affiliated with the Convention, shall 
have the power at any time to create any debt or obligation binding on 
the Convention. 

Sec. 6. If for any reason, it shall be necessary to select a place or 
to change the time or place of the meeting of the Convention after the 
Convention adjourns, the President, Recording Secretary and the Gen- 
eral Secretary of the Convention shall be a committee with power to 
make necessary change or changes. 

Sec. 7. This constitution may be changed or amended on any day of 
any annual session of the Convention by two-thirds vote of the members 
present when the vote is taken, provided notice of the contemplated 
amendment or change shall have been announced on a previous day of the 
Convention. 

BY-LAWS OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

I. THE PRESIDENT AND RECORDING SECRETARY 

The President of the General Board, in addition to the regular duties 
incumbent upon such officers, shall appoint special committees to investi- 
gate and report upon any matters which concern equally all departments 
of the work of the Convention. The Secretary shall record all proceed- 
ings in correct form and preserve the same. 

II. OFFICERS, SECRETARIES AND DEPARTMENTAL 
ASSISTANTS 

At the annual December meeting of the General Board, there shall 
be elected the following officers, who shall serve for one year, and until 
their successors are elected and qualified : President, Vice-President and 
Recording Secretary. 

At the same time the Board shall elect all Departmental Heads and 
such other assistants as may from time to time be deemed necessary, and 
shall fix compensation of its Secretaries and other employees. 

III. QUORUM 

Seventeen members shall be required to constitute a quorum of the 
Board. Five shall be required to constitute a quorum of any Depart- 



Annual of Session 1935 15 

ment. Four shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Committee of 
the General Board. 

IV. THE WORK OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

The work of the General Board shall be apportioned among its four 
divisions, in so far as may be practicable, as indicated below. The Gen- 
eral Board, the Exceutive Committee of the General Board and the 
General Secretary (48 members exclusive of the President and Secretary 
of the Convention, who are ex officio members) : 

1. Department of Missions — (12) Secretary of Missions — Division 
of (1) Field Work; (2) Evangelism; (3) Negro Work. 

2. Department of Training — (12) — Secretary of Training — Division 
of (1) Sunday Schools— Secretary ; (2) B. Y. P. U— Secretary ; (3) 
Student Activities. 

3. Department of Benevolences — (12) — Secretary of Benevolences — 
Division of (1) Orphanage; (2) Hospital; (3) Ministers' Relief. 

4. Department of Education — (12) — Secretary of Education — Divi- 
sion of (1) Educational Institution; (2) Ministerial Education. 

5. Department of Woman's Missionary Union. 

The Executive Committee shall have power in its discretion, to mod- 
ify, enlarge, diminish, or otherwise alter the divisions of the work 
of the Board as it may from time to time deem advisable or necessary, 
the changes so made to be reported to the next regular meeting of the 
General Board for its consideration. 

V. UNDESIGNATED GIFTS 

The General Board at its annual meeting shall determine the per- 
centage of undesignated gifts that each object of the Convention shall 
receive, including State and South-wide, provided always that any alloca- 
tion of such funds shall not violate any order with respect to the same 
previously made by the Baptist State Conventon. 

VI. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The Executive Committee shall have power to borrow money and 
execute notes on behalf of the General Board for the purpose of meeting 
the obligations of said Board, and to 'do and perform any act incidental 
to or necessary in the execution and discharge of the work of the Gen- 
eral Board: Provided, the Executive Committee shall not incur obliga- 
tions for any object in excess of the budget fixed by the General Board. 
Notes may be executed in the name of the General Board and on its 
behalf by the Chairman of the Executive Committee attested by the 
General Secretary, and when so executed by authority of the Executive 



16 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Committee duly give, shall be the binding obligation of the General 
Board. 

The Executive Committee of the General Board shall meet in regular 
session at ten a.m., on Tuesday following the first Sunday in each month, 
but it may meet in called session at any other time upon call of the Gen- 
eral Secretary. 

VII. SECRETARY OF EDUCATION 

His duties, together with all other Departmental Heads, or Assistants, 
shall be determined from time to time by the General Board. 

VIII. EXECUTIVE SESSION 

The General Board may by a majority vote of the number present, 
go into executive session at any time for the purpose of considering 
such matters as may claim the consideration of said Board. 

IX. AMENDMENTS 

These by-laws may be amended at any regular meeting by a majority 
vote of the members attending said meeting. 

X. PUBLICATION 

These by-laws, together with any amendments that may be made 
thereon, from time to time, shall be printed in the Minutes of the Bap- 
tist State Convention. 



PROCEEDINGS 



171 



I PROCEEDINGS I 

Asheville, North Carolina 
November 12, 1935 

1. North Carolina Baptists after a space of fifteen years 
gathered in Asheville and in the spacious auditorium of the 
First Baptist Church opened the sessions of their One Hun- 
dred Fifth Annual Convention on November 12. 1935, with 
Zeno Wall, Shelby, President, presiding. 

2. Prior to the convening of the Convention at 2 :00 P.M., 
Miss Violet Cook, guest organist of the Asheville Church 
pla)' , ed. 

3. "I Am Thine O Lord" was the opening song to be led 
by H. C. Seefeldt, Shelby, named by President Hall as Director 
of music for the Convention. 

4. W. H. Moore, Wadesboro. led the devotions in the 
opening session. 

Song: "I Love to Tell the Story." 

5. The President named this Committee: 

Committee on Enrollment: Don C. Young, Chairman, T. L. 
Sasser, B. F. Bray, W. K. McGee, F. A. Bower, Nane Starnes. 

Enrollment: Complying with the Constitution the enrollment 
of members of the Convention began on November 12, 1935, and 
the ruling of the Convention was upon motion by J. C. Owen, 
Asheville that the present enrollment constitute the Convention and 
that messengers arriving too late to be enrolled are to be recog- 
nized as members following registration. 

6. General Secretary M. A. Huggins asked for the privilege 
of presenting the following Asheville ministers, E. Gibson 
Davis, James A. Ivey, C. K. Turner, W. R. Burrell, J. B. 
Grice, J. R. Owen, and Nane Starnes, also Don C. Young, Gen- 
eral Chairman of the Convention, and E. E. Wheeler, Chair- 
man of Home Assignments, who have so splendidly planned 
for this Convention. 

[19] 



20 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

7. The Convention visitors were cordially received and ex- 
tended a warm welcome by President Wall. ( See page 70) . 

8. President Wall made known this Committee : 

Committee on Committees: J. Clyde Turner, Chairman, Hugh 
A. Ellis, E. L. Wells, Fuller Hamrick, J. M. Kester, H. W. 
Baucom, D. G. Washburn, Mrs. J. J. Roddick, A. B. Conrad, 
Mrs. J. J. Roddick. 

9. Chairman Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte, placed 
before the Convention the Order of Business as now being 
followed and following motion by Brother Williams was 
adopted. 

ORDER OF BUSINESS 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON, NOVEMBER 12 

2 :00 — Worship W. H. Moore, Wadesboro 

2:15 — Enrollment and Organization 
2:30 — Appointment of Committees 
2 :35 — Presentation of New Pastors 
2 :45 — Presentation of Reports 

3 :30 — Biblical Recorder 

4 :00 — Worship and Sermon Richard K. Redwine, Hickory 

Alternate, J. B. Willis, Hamlet 

TUESDAY EVENING 

7 :30 — Worship John T. Wayland, Monroe 

7:45 — Report of Baptist Foundation 

8:15 — Report of the Trustees of the Convention 

8 :20 — Foreign Missions 

9:45 — Miscellaneous and Adjournment 

WEDNESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 13 

9 :00 — Worship C. H. Myers, Mooresville 

9:15 — Miscellaneous and Journal 

9 :30 — Orphanage 
10:15— Hospital 

11 :00 — Southwestern Seminary 

11 :15 — Report of Committee on Aged and Infirm 

1 1 :30 — Relief and Annuity Board 

12:00 — Inspiration Address Dr. Millard A. Jenkins, Abilene, Texas 



Annual of Session 1935 21 

wednesday afternoon 

This Session will meet at Mars Hill College 
Auditorium 

2 :30— Worship W. L. Griggs, Charlotte 

2:45 — Report of the Colleges 

3 :50 — Address, Christian Education Luther Little, Charlotte 

4 :30 — Adjournment 

WEDNESDAY EVENING 

7 : 30_Worship T. F. Deitz, Beta 

7 :45 — Miscellaneous 

8 :00 — Woman's Missionary Union 
8 :30 — Music and Miscellaneous 

8:35 — Report of Committee to Memorialize Congress on Subject of 
War 

8 :45 — Social Service and Civic Righteousness 
9 :45 — Adjournment 

THURSDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 14 

9 :00 — Worship N. C. Teague, Winston-Salem 

9:15 — Journal and Miscellaneous 

9 :30 — Report of Laymen's Convention Committee 
10 :00 — Sunday School Board 

10:30 — Report of Committee on Change of Constitution Affecting Elec- 
tion of Trustees, etc. 
10 :45 — Co-operative Program 
12 :00 — Inspirational Address Dr. Millard A. Jenkins 

THURSDAY AFTERNOON 

2:15— Worship C. R. Pittard, Apex 

2:30 — Miscellaneous and Reports of Committees 

(1) Biblical Recorder Advisory Council 

(2) On Nomination of Trustees, etc. 
2 :45 — Election of Officers 

3 :00— State Missions 

4 :00 — Seminaries 

Southern Baptist Theological, Louisville 
Baptist Bible Institute, New Orleans 
4:45 — Miscellaneous and Adjournment 

THURSDAY EVENING 

7:30— Worship W. H. Covert, Forest City 

7 :45 — Miscellaneous 



22 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

8 :00 — Report of Committees 

(1) On Report of General Board 

(2) On Resolutions 

(3) On Publicity 

(4) Memorials and Report of Special Committees 

(5) Time, Place, and Preacher 

(6) Historical Commission 
8 :30 — Home Missions 

9:45 — -Miscellaneous and Final Adjournment 

Wm. Harrison Williams, Chairman 

W. A. x\yers 

B. E. Morris 

T. R. Johnson 

A. J. Smith 

Mrs. J. R. Jester 

Committee on Order of Business 

10. As the special order of business the Convention pro- 
ceeded to elect its officers in the following : 

(a) Maloy A. Huggins, Raleigh, was elected the Conven- 
tion General Secretary by the rising vote of the Convention 
upon motion made by Luther Little, Charlotte. 

(b) As Recording Secretary the Convention selected Charles 
B. Deane, Rockingham, upon rising vote on motion made by D. 
K. Mason, Winston-Salem. 

(c) D. H. Wilcox, Winston-Salem, moved and Perry Mor- 
gan, Raleigh was elected Statistical Secretary of the Conven- 
tion. 

11. Among the new ministers introduced by Secretary 
Huggins were : 

New Ministers: H. W. Baucom, Jr., John Bomar. Nathan C. 
Brooks. Jr., John H. Bunn, W. M. Burns, W. C. Darnell, P. D. 
Fletcher, Thomas B. Flowe, Paul Forsythe, Robert A. Gardner, 

B. F. Gehring, T. Sloane Guy. James H. Hatley, Luther Hux, 
Walter L. Johnson, H. Fletcher Lambert, T. S. Lawrence, John 
R. Link, W. W. Lynes, J. L. Martin, Luther J. Matthews, John 
L. Pearce, J. Louis Price, J. A. Seymour, N. A. Thompson, Jr., 

C. B. Vause, W. T. Whittington, Forest L. Young, Whitten Dur- 
ham, E. T. Parham, J. Ned Taylor, W. B. Jenkins, J. B. Little, 
James B. Overton, Edward E. Rutledge, R. L. Ward, H. F. Bean. 



They were each assured by President Wall that the Con- 
vention was happy to welcome them into the fellowship of the 
Baptist State Convention. 

12. President Wall recognized General Secretary Huggins 
who brought as a matter of information at this time his report 
included and previously distributed in printed form under the 
title "Advance Report of the General Board", calling special 
attention to the twenty-two Convention Objectives adopted by 
the 1933 Convention. (See page 72, Section 104). The Con- 
vention joyfully noted that objective sixteen is within our reach. 
Secretary Huggins said that on November 11, 1934 he an- 
nounced at the New Bern Convention total gifts received at 
$327,039.00. Between that date and the close of 1934 the 
churches gave an additional $114,287.00. Reading a telegram 
just received from the Raleigh office it was found that $362,- 
114.00 had been received through the morning of November 
12, 1935. Brother Huggins made this observation : "If you 
good pastors will send to us $137,886.00 between this date and 
the close of 1935 we will attain our goal of One Half Million 
Dollars annual income of designated and undesignated funds." 

Song : "He Leadeth Me". 

13. A. I. Justice, Hendersonville led the Convention in a 
prayer of thanksgiving for the noble work of the pastors, 
workers, and churches during the past year as reflected in the 
report read by Secretary Huggins. 

14. Editor J. S. Farmer, read as a matter of information 
a report on the Biblical Recorder to be followed by a discus- 
sion of this publication in which Brethren W. G. McGee, Bur- 
lington, J. Clifton Allen, and R. E. Hardaway, Lenoir, took 
part. 

REPORT ON BIBLICAL RECORDER 

On the first of last January the Biblical Recorder's second century 
of service to the Baptists of North Carolina was begun. Possibly no 
issue of the Recorder in its long history has been more acceptable than 
the Centennial issue, which was the first one of this year. 

Our subscription list stands almost exactly the same as a year ago, 
which is 10,600. The need of increasing the circulation is more urgent 
than a year ago. Though we have made our best effort to increase 



24 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

the circulation, counting the losses of the summer months, we have not 
been able to make any gain. If the Biblical Recorder is to render the 
service which was in the mind of Thomas Meredith when he founded 
the paper, and which has been in the mind of every editor from then 
until now — namely, to help the Baptists of North Carolina carry for- 
ward their work in a substantial way — we must increase the circula- 
tion. We again ask the Convention to authorize its General Board to 
co-operate with the Biblical Recorder Publishing Company in this effort. 
We hope to make a thorough canvass of the Baptists of the State for 
subscriptions during the coming year, but to do this we must have the 
co-operation of the pastors and churches. 

If denominational ownership will cause the Baptists of North Caro- 
lina to put the Recorder in the homes of our people, the Biblical 
Recorder Publishing Company is ready any day to sell the Biblical 
Recorder to the Convention on terms satisfactory to both parties. The 
future development of our people is dependent upon the right sort of 
information concerning the Kingdom of Christ. With this in view, we 
once more urge the importance of this Convention giving serious thought 
to authorizing its General Board to join the Biblical Recorder Publish- 
ing Company in an effort to increasing the Recorder's circulation. 

N. A. DUNN, 
President, Board of Directors. 
J. S. FARMER. 
Editor and Secy.-Treas. 

15. "Sunrise Tomorrow" was sung by Director H. C. 
Seefeldt, accompanied at the organ by Miss Violet Cook. 

16. J. B. Willis, Hamlet, read the Scripture and prayed, to 
be followed by Richard K. Redwine, Hickory, who preached 
the Convention Sermon using as his text Math. 17:5, and his 
theme, "Hear Ye Him". 

Song: "Jesus Calls Us". 

17. J. B. Willis offered prayer and the session closed. 

TUESDAY— Evening Session 

18. The singing of "We're Marching to Zion", opened the 
Tuesday evening session, after which John T. Wayland, Mon- 
roe led the worship service. 

19. A quartet composed of Rush Hamrick, M. A. Spang- 
ler, E. B. Hill and Hugh Plaster from the First Baptist Church, 








WARD BLOWERS EDWARDS 

Born at Troupsburg, Steuben County, New York, June 21, 1885, the son of 
Charles P. and Livonia (Blowers) Edwards. First came to North Carolina in 
1898 removing later to Eaton, Colorado where his early education took place. In 
1912 Wake Forest College conferred on him the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
Columbia University conferred on him the. degree of Master of Arts in 1920. 
Afterwards studied at the University of Chicago and again at Columbia. Chowan 
College conferred on him the honorary degree of Doctor of Education in 1934. 
Married C. Stanley of Northampton County July 26. 1916. Principal at Grifton 
High School 1912-1915; Jackson High School 1915-1918; Weldon Schools 1918- 
1924; Dean Chowan College 1924-1926. In 1926 he. was elected President of 
Chowan College and thus served until his death which occurred in the early 
morning at Lakeview Hospital, Suffolk County, Virginia, September 7, 1935. 
Buried in Cedarwood Cemetery, Weldon, North Carolina. 



Annual of Session 1935 ■ 25 

Shelby, sang "More Love to Thee" with Miss Kathryn King, 
First Baptist Church, Asheville, organist, playing. 

20. "Send Out Thy Light" was the special musical number 
presented here by the choir of the First Church, Asheville. 

21. Through Theodore S. Johnson, Raleigh, Secretary, the 
North Carolina Baptist Foundation made its report and upon 
motion to adopt the report was discussed by Secretary Johnson 
and Director J. L. Peacock, Tarboro, and thereafter adopted. 
(See page 113, section 133). 

Song : "We've a Story to Tell to the Nations". 

22. Secretary J. M. Kester, Wilmington, of the Committee 
on Committees released for the Committee, as given and 
amended from time to time during the Convention, the follow- 
ing committees : 

COMMITTEES OF THE PRESENT SESSIONS 
Committee to Report on General Board's Report: 

A. J. Barton, Chairman, D. H. Wilcox, E. B. Jenkins, Eugene 
I. Olive, L. R. O'Brien. 

Committee on Place and Preacher: 

Louis S. Gaines, Chairman, W. T. Baucom, Ira D. S. Knight, 
T. L. Cashwell, O. G. Tillman, A. P. Stevens, Mrs. J. R. 
M organ. 

Committee on Resolutions: 

Forrest C. Feezor, Chairman, Wilson W. Woodcock, E. N. 
Johnson. 

STANDING COMMITTEES 
To Report in 1936 

Historical Commission: 

George W. Paschal, Chairman, Wake Forest ; L. E. M. Free- 
man, Raleigh ; W. E. Cullom, Wake Forest ; J. W. Lynch, 
Wake Forest; Mrs. Ethel T. Crittenden, Wake Forest; R. L. 
Moore, Mars Hill; A. I. Justice, Hendersonville ; B. W. Spil- 
man, Kinston ; M. Leslie Davis, Beaufort ; Mrs. T. N. Pitman, 
Raleigh; Mrs. E. F. Aydlett, Elizabeth City. 



26 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Committee on Memorials: 

R. E. Hardaway, Chairman; Lenoir; J. F. Carter, Winston- 
Salem; T. F. Deitz, Beta; Y. C. Elliott, Clayton; R. E. 
Powell, Burnsville ; . J. A. Snow, Wingate ; J. P. Harris, 
Maysville. 

Order of Business 1936: 

J. A. Easley, Chairman, Wake Forest; G. N. Cowan, Apex; 
T. L. Sasser, Reidsville; B. W. Spilman, Kinston ; Mrs. J. 
S. Farmer, Raleigh; Charles H. Stevens, Winston-Salem. 

*Needy, Aged and Infirm: 

Jno. A. Oates, Chairman, Fayetteville ; T. S. Johnson, Raleigh; 
Mrs. Ira D. S. Knight, Durham; W. D. Poe, Oxford; C. H. 
Durham, Lumberton ; Mrs. F. A. Bower, Gastonia ; R. J. 
Hall, Bladenboro. 

Committee to Nominate Trustees of the Convention, Its 
Institutions, and Members of the General Board for 1936: 

E. Gibson Davis, Chairman, Asheville; J. T. Riddick, Durham; 
B. F. Bray, Marion; V. M. Dorsett, Siler City; G. H. Jones, 
High Point ; E. F. Hardin, Lincolnton ; Claude F. Gaddy, Ra- 
leigh ; John T. Coley, Rocky Mount ; Mrs. W. W. Parker, 
Henderson ; Mrs. W. K. McGee, Thomasville. 

Publicity Committee: 

Charles H. Dickey, Chairman, Raleigh; Charles B. Deane, 
Rockingham ; Jasper L. Memory, Wake Forest ; Santf ord 
Martin, Winston-Salem ; J. S. Farmer, Raleigh ; John Arch 
McMillan, Thomasville. 

Social Service and Civic Righteousness: 

Charles E. Brewer, Chairman, Raleigh; J. C. Hough, Kin- 
ston ; R. H. Satterfield, Wilmington ; W. K. McGee, Thomas- 
ville ; E. M. Harris, Aberdeen ; F. A. Bower, Albemarle ; 
Mrs. D. C. Martin. Asheville. 

■^Committee to Consider Usefulness or Wisdom 
of Purchasing Biblical Recorder: 

Charles H. Durham, Chairman, Lumberton; J. L. Peacock, 
Tarboro ; L. L. Hatfield, Hickory ; Johnson J. Hayes, Greens- 
boro; F. C. Feezor, Raleigh; A. J. Smith, Greensboro; A. J. 
Barton, Wilmington. 



* This Committee did not report in 1935 and is carried forward to report in 
1936. 

** This Committee was named by President Wall from the chair. 



Annual of Session 1935 



27 



Committee to Consider Change in Time of 
Meeting of Convention: 

T. H. King, Chairman, Clinton ; W. R. Bradshaw, Hickory ; 
I. G. Greer, Thomasville ; J. B. Grice, Asheville ; Oscar 
Creech, Ahoskie. 

Committee to Recommend Program to Aid Former Prisoners: 

M. L. Skaggs, Chairman, Buie's Creek ; E. N. Gardner, Dunn ; 
J. M. Broughton, Raleigh ; E. McNeill Poteat, Raleigh ; E. C. 
Kolb, Windsor. 

Baptist's Men's Convention Committee: 

R. N. Simms, Chairman, Raleigh ; John T. Coley, Rocky 
Mount; T. A. Avera, Rocky Mount; G. H. Jones, High 
Point ; C. H. Durham, Lumberton ; M. Leslie Davis, Beau- 
fort ; K. R. Curtis, Wilson ; Ira D. S. Knight, Durham ; 
Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte ; John J. Hayes, Greens- 
boro. 



Promotion and 

Association 
Brushy Mountain 
Alexander 
Alleghany 
Anson 
Ashe 
Atlantic 
Avery 
Beulah 
Bladen 
Blue Ridge 
Briar Creek 
Brunswick 
Buncombe 
Cabarrus 
Caldwell 

Cape Fear Colum 
Catawba River 
Carolina 
Central 
Chowan 
Dock 
Eastern 
Elkin 



Enlistment : 

Name 
Eugene I. Olive, Chm. 
Charles E. Echerd 
W. F. Doughton 
C. Ray Little 
Ira T. Johnson 
J. P. Harris 
G. D. Danner 
L. V. Coggins 
R. J. Hall 
G. A. Condray 
N. T. Jarvis 
T. H. Biles 
James A. Ivey 
E. S. Summers 
R. D. Carroll 
bus R. J. Rasberry 
W. P. Crouch 
N. B. Phillips 
Claude F. Gaddy 
Geo. W. Lassiter 
M. V. Simmons 
J. L. Carlton 
M. L. Pettyjohn 



Address 
North Wilkesboro 
Taylorsville 
Laurel Springs 
Polkton 

West Jefferson 
Maysville 
Crossnore 
Semora 
Bladenboro 
Marion 
Roaring River 
Southport 
West Asheville 
Concord 
Hudson 
Whiteville 
Morganton 
East Flat Rock 
Raleigh 
Edenton 
Ash 

Warsaw 
Elkin 



28 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Association 
Flat River 
French Broad 
Gaston 
Green River 
Haywood 
Johnston 
Kings Mountain 
Liberty 
Little River 
Macon 
Mecklenburg 
Mitchell 
Montgomery 
Mt. Zion 
Neuse 

New Found 
New South River 
Pamlico 
Pee Dee 
Piedmont 
Pilot Mountain 
Raleigh 

Randolph County 
Roanoke 
Robeson 
Rowan 
Sandy Creek 
Sandy Run 
South Fork 
South Mountain 
South Yadkin 
Stanly 

Stone Mountain 
Stony Fork 
Surry 
Tar River 
Tennessee River 
Three Forks 
Transylvania 
Tuckaseigee 
Union 

West Chowan 
West Liberty 



Name 
W. D. Poe 
Hoyt Blackwell 
M. L. Barnes 
R. E. Price 
H. W. Baucom 
Y. C. Elliott 
W. A. Elam 
W. L. Warfrord 
E. N. Gardner 
E. B. Dehart * 
Ben Favell 
Roy D. Campbell 

C. B. Vause 

Ira D. S. Knight 
Joe C. Hough 
J. H. Roberts 

D. W. Clemmons 

E. R. Stewart 
T. W. Hearne 
Clarence A. Smith 
D. H. Wilcox 

L. R. Evans 
H. M. Stroup 
John T. Coley 
C. J. Allen 
C. A. Rhyne 
R. H. Weaver 
Charles A. Maddry 
L. L. Hatfield 
J. R. Hufman 
B. E. Morris 
L. D. Munn 
J. A. Gillam 
G. W. Gragg 
A. V. West 
J. E. Allen 
Vane A. Browning 
Roy Dotson 
J. E. Burt 
W. N. Cook 
J. T. Wayland 
J. O. Walton 
Fred Stiles 



Address 
Oxford 
Mars Hill 
Mt. Holly 
Rutherfordton 
Waynesville 
Clayton 
Shelby 
Lexington 
Dunn 
Franklin 
Charlotte 
Wing 
Troy 
Durham 
Kinston 
Hot Springs 
Fayetteville 
Fairfield 
Rockingham 
High Point 
Winston-Salem 
Knightdale 
Ramseur 
Rocky Mount 
Fairmont 
Salisbury 
Bonlee 
Spindale 
Hickory 

Connelly Springs 
Statesville 
Badin 
Hays 
Boone 
Mt. Airy 
Warrenton 
Bryson City 
Boone 
Rosman 
Webster 
Monroe 
Windsor 
Murphy 



Annual of Session 1935 29 

Association Name Address 

Western N. C. W. A. Adams Murphy 

Wilmington A. J. Barton Wilmington 

Yadkin J. P. Davis Boonville 

Yancey R. E. Powell Burnsville 

23. A great Foreign Mission Hour followed, first by the 
reading of the report by State Board Member J. Marcus Kester, 
Wilmington, who next introduced Foreign Mission Secretary 
Charles E. Maddry, Richmond. Prior to Dr. Maddry's address 
he asked the following North Carolina Foreign Missionaries 
and workers, home on leave or furlough to come forward and 
be presented, each speaking briefly. They were Mr. and Mrs. 
W. H. Tipton, Brazil ; Miss Naomi E. Schell, Tobita, Japan ; 
and Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Olive, China. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

We are glad to report still greater progress in our foreign mission 
work during the past year. In fact, the past year has been the best 
year since the period of decline and depression came upon us. In many 
ways we seem to be facing a new day for our work. 

First of all, we would record the new encouragement, or spirit of 
encouragement, which has come into our missionaries and workers 
in the Far East where about half of our work is done. The Commission 
to the Far East to which we referred last year accomplished a great 
work. Dr. and Mrs. J. B. Weatherspoon and Dr. and Mrs. Chas. E. 
Maddry composed the commission. As a result of a careful, personal 
survey of the work in that section, and the personal touch, and the 
reorganization, all the workers feel that a new day has dawned for 
the work in that part of the world. 

Because of the Executive Secretary's visits to the fields of Europe 
and Palestine last summer and to the Far East last winter and spring, 
the work has been reorganized in a very definite and efficient way. 
The work is grasped and understood as it has not been in many years. 
This means greater efficiency for the work, and marked advance we 
believe and hope. 

Then, too, we are glad to report nearly two thousand more baptisms 
on the various fields the past year than the previous year. There were 
15,969 baptisms in 1934, and 17,794 in 1935. Roumania heads the list 
with 6,050 baptisms, and Brazil comes second with 4,634 and China with 
4,115, the North China Mission alone reporting 2,475. Africa had 
1,065 baptisms. So the work goes forward in this vital way. 



30 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Arid this fall, for the first time in several years, the Board was able 
to appoint a number of new missionaries and send them forth. Twenty- 
three were appointed in person at the October meeting of the Board. 
Some others, the sons and daughters of missionaries already on the field, 
were also appointed, after special examination by special committees. 
Then there were several reappointments of those who for several years 
have been home. In all thirty-three were sent forth to the work. This 
number however does not yet bring us up to normal as there have been 
several deaths and resignations and retirements in the past year. Our 
number now stands at 398. which is much below what we had a few 
years ago. 

And, our new day is further seen in the reduction of our debt which 
for many years has hampered the work. During the year through sale 
of property, and through the Hundred Thousand Club, and through 
the Wade Bryant Plan, the debt has been reduced some four hundred 
thousand dollars, and now stands at $508,500.00. Plans are definitely 
made whereby we hope that by the year 1938 we shall report no debt 
on the work. 

During the summer our Executive Secretary and others expect to 
survey the work in South America. Also Dr. Truett. of our Conven- 
tion, now President of the Baptist World Alliance, expects to visit the 
Far East. These visits ought to further strengthen the forces and 
advance the Kingdom. These visits together with the Centennial cele- 
brations both in China and in America ought to bring clear dawn for a 
mighty century just ahead in bringing in God's Kingdom, or at least 
preaching the Gospel to all nations. 

Our Board appreciates all that the churches are doing in North 
Carolina, which while it does not lead, stands along in the forefront in 
its support of this eternal cause. 

24. After this great spiritfufly filled service Brother A. J. 
Terry prayed and the sessions of Tuesday closed. 

WEDNESDAY— Morning Session 

25. Assemblying at 9 :00 o'clock, Brother Seefeldt led the 
Convention in the singing of "Holy, Holy, Holy", and there- 
after B. W. Spilman, Kinston. read the Scripture and prayed. 

26. The Tuesday's Journal was read, adjusted and con- 
firmed. 

27. Mrs. Estelle Fox and B. L. Mullinax, Asheville First 
Church, sang "Nearer My God to Thee" with Forrest C. 
Feezor. Raleigh, offering another prayer of devotion. 



Annual of Session 1935 31 

28. Fifty Years of Baptist Orphanage work in North Caro- 
lina was unfolded at this time when I. G. Greer, General 
Superintendent of the North Carolina Baptist Orphanage 
opened the hour and was followed by : 

(a) Wiley Jarrell, a fourteen year old lad from Davidson 
County and an Orphanage boy since two years of age, who 
gave the report. 

(b) Next the Superintendent presented Mrs. Mary Yar- 
borough, age sixty, who on November 11, 1885, was received 
at the Baptist Orphanage at Thomasville as Mary Presson, 
our first orphan. Mrs. Yarborough spoke briefly. 

(c) Two other children from the Mills Home, Sammie 
Brafford, of Cumberland County, age six, and Paul Smith, 
Caldwell County, age four, sang. 

(d) Miss Mary Misenheimer an Orphanage Graduate of the 
Class of 1921, and originally from Stanly County and a Gradu- 
ate of Meredith College in 1926, who is pursuing her Master's 
degree at Duke University spoke to the Orphanage report and 
brought the message of the hour. 

(e) Other Orphanage graduates followed when Miss Hazel 
Martin, Director of Music, North Carolina School for the 
Blind, Raleigh sang "O Love that Will Not Let Me Go" ac- 
companied by violinist Mrs. Ruth Hood Vause and Pianist 
Carl -Hood. Asheville. 

(f) Responding with Brother Greer leading the Convention 
sang "Faith of Our Fathers" whereupon the report of the 
Orphanage revealing one-half century of service was adopted. 
(See Page 105, Section 127). 

29. A change in the order of business received the approval 
of the Convention when a report on the Southwestern Seminary 
would be received on this date at the eleven o'clock hour, fol 
lowing recommendation by Order of Business Chairman, Wm. 
Harrison Williams. 

Messages from the Convention 

30. Greetings : 

(a) Upon motion by T. H. King, Clinton, Recording Secre- 
tary Charles B. Deane was requested by the Convention to send 



32 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

messages of greetings to other Baptist State Conventions now 
convening. The messages went to : 

Asheville, North Carolina, 
November 13, 1935. 

Alabama State Convention, Troy 

Baptist State Convention of Georgia, Atlanta 

The General Association of Baptist in Kentucky, Ashland 

Louisiana Baptist State Convention, Bogalusa 

Mississippi Baptist State Convention, Meridian 

Tennessee Baptist Convention, Paris 

North Carolina Baptists in one hundred fifth annual session record 
greatest accomplishments in many years. We pray that you too may 
feel the joy of a year's work well done. 

CHARLES B. DEANE, 
Secretary for the Convention. 

(b) It was the desire of the Convention and the Secretary 
sent this personal message to these three brethren who were 
unable to attend this meeting, upon motion by T. H. King. 

Asheville, North Carolina, 
November 13, 1935. 

William Louis Poteat, Wake Forest 

R. T. Vann, Raleigh 

Joel S. Snyder, Fayetteville 

You are remembered and loved by North Carolina Baptists in their 
one hundred fifth annual session. 

CHARLES B. DEANE, 
Secretary for the Convention. 

Messages to Convention 

Atlanta, Georgia 
November 13, 1935 

State Baptist Convention 

Asheville 

Georgia Baptist in 114th Annual Session send fraternal greetings in 
the spirit of our Christ and with the vision and the courage of our 
Christ may we accept the challenge of the worlds great needs and press 
forward with sure confidence of blessed victory. 

R. D. Ragsdale, Secretary. 



Annual of Session 1935 33 

Troy, Alabama 
November 13, 1935 
Charles B. Deane, Secretary 
Baptist State Convention, Asheville 

We unite with you in faith, prayer and work under the leadership 
of our Saviour. God bless you in all your deliberations, Ephesians three, 
twenty and twenty-one. 

Alabama Baptist State Convention 

Ashland, Kentucky 
November 13, 1935 
The North Carolina Baptist Convention 
Charles B. Beane, Secretary, Asheville 

Kentucky Baptist appreciate the fellowship of North Carolina Bap- 
tists. Go forward first, First Corinthians, One Nine. 

H. S. Summers, Secretary 

Meridian, Mississippi 
November 13. 1935 

North Carolina Baptist Convention 

Asheville 

Mississippi Baptists in convention salute you. Second Corinthians, 

thirteen fourteen. 

Walter E. Lee, Secretary 

Paris, Tennessee 
November 13, 1935 
Baptist Convention 
Asheville 

Tennessee Baptists in sixty-first annual session send greetings in the 
name of our risen Lord and pray that His courage and vision may belong 
to us as we carry out his commissions. 

Communication Committee Tennessee Baptist Convention 

Other Messages Read 

Wake Forest, N. C. 
November 13, 1935 

Charles B. Deane, Recording Secretary 
Baptist State Convention, Asheville 

I am deeply grateful for the message of the convention my chief joy 
is still to serve the kingdom to which it is committed only obligation to 
my three hundred students kept me from its sessions this time. 

William Louis Poteat 



34 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Raleigh, N. C. 

November 13, 1935 
Baptist State Convention 
Charles B. Deane, Secretary, Asheville 

Deep and unchanging love stop Phillipians One three. 

R. T. Vann 

Fayetteville, N. C. 

November 13. 1935 
Baptist Convention 
Charles B. Deane. Secretary, Asheville 

Your message is a balm to my heart let our united prayer and effort 
be Matthew six ten. 

Joel S. Snyder 

31. With Vice-President J. Ben Eller, Statesville, presid- 
ing, Superintendent A. J. Hagaman, brought the Baptist Hos- 
pital Report (see page 107, section 128), whereupon the Con- 
vention stood voting approvingly of the work being accom- 
plished at our Winston-Salem Hospital. 

32. A request number "Beneath the Cross of Jesus" was 
sung by Miss Hazel Martin. 

33. Faculty Representative W. W. Barnes brought the re- 
port and message from the Southwestern Baptist Theological 
Seminary, Seminary Hill, Texas. 

34. Committeeman J. Marcus Kester read additional Com- 
mittees reported from the Committee on Committees, and mov- 
ing their election the Convention so ordered. (See page 25, 
Section 22). 

Song: "The Great Physician". 

35. Today's visitors not heretofore recognized were noted 
and welcomed. (See page 70). 

36. In the absence of a report on the Needy, Aged and 
Infirm, due at this time, the order of the Convention being to 
carry forward to the next year's Convention upon motion by 
Theodore S. Johnson, Raleigh. 

37. Field Secretary B. Frank Hasty, with headquarters at 
Greenville, S. C, brought the Relief and Annuity Report to be 



Annual of Session 1935 35 

adopted following motion, by the Convention. (See Page 102, 
Section 126). 

Song: "All Hail the Power of Jesus Name". 

38. President Zeno Wall requested Arch C. Cree, Salis- 
bury, to present Pastor Millard A. Jenkins, Abilene. Texas, a 
native North Carolinian who brought the first of two inspira- 
tional addresses. 

39. This session adjourned with prayer by Arch C. Cree. 

WEDNESDAY— Afternoon Session 

40. One of the great sessions of the Convention convened 
at 2 :30 in the auditorium at Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, with 
the Convention singing "Come Thou Almighty King" accom- 
panied by the Mars Hill Orchestra. 

41. YV. L. Griggs, Charlotte, offered the devotions and was 
followed by the Mars Hill College Glee Club singing "Beauti- 
ful Saviour." 

42. The Christian Education report (see pages 98 ff) was 
read by General Secretary Maloy A. Huggins, and with W. R. 
Cullom, Wake Forest presiding the various College represen- 
tatives spoke to reports : 

(a) For Wake Forest came the college pastor, J. A. Easley. 

(b) President Charles E. Brewer spoke for Meredith as did 
Mrs. Gordon Maddry of Ahoskie. 

(c) Chowan was presented by John H. Bunn. Murfrees- 
boro. The absence of former President W. B. Edwards, who 
died September 5, 1935, was sadly recalled at this time. 

(d) Both Robert L. Moore, Mars Hill President and Hoyt 
Blackwell spoke for this host school. 

(e) The message from Campbell came from the President, 
Leslie H. Campbell. 

43. "The Story of Jesus Can Never Grow Old" was sung 
by Edward E. Rutledge, Charlotte, to be followed by Luther 
Little, Charlotte, in the feature message of the afternoon on 
"Christian Education." 

Song : "Oh, How I Love Jesus". 

44. Prior to the adoption of the report on Christian Edu- 



36 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

cation the General Secretary earnestly plead that our Conven- 
tion wipe out as quickly as possible the hindering- influence of 
debt on Christian Education. 

45. E. A. Paul, Lumberton, prayed and the afternoon ses- 
sion closed to meet at 7 :30 in the evening back with the First 
Baptist Church, in Asheville. 

WEDNESDAY— Evening Session 

46. Immediately following the singing of "Blessed Assur- 
ance" T. F. Deitz, Beta led the devotions. 

47. The Promotion-Executive Committee was released by 
the Committee on Committees through the Committee Secre- 
tary, J. Marcus Kester. (See page 25, section 22). 

48. A resolution adopted by the Trustees of the North 
Carolina Baptist Hospital, Inc., was presented by Smith Haga- 
man, Superintendent, and upon the rule of the chair the reso- 
lution printed herewith was referred to the Committee on 
Resolutions. 

RESOLUTION NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

Whereas, the North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Inc., issued bonds 
or notes in the sum of $125,000.00, all of which said amount has been 
paid except $64,000.00; and, 

Whereas, the hospital at Winston-Salem, N. C. has been over- 
crowded for a number of months and many days not able to enter all 
who came ; and, 

Whereas, the offices in said hospital are all over-crowded, the first 
floor of said hospital now being crowded with filing cabinets for want 
of room in the offices ; and, , 

Whereas, the fifth floor of the hospital building, once used for 
interns and nurses' quarters, has been opened up for patients, leaving 
only two small rooms on the first floor for interns, the hospital being 
in need of not less than four rooms for interns; and, 

Whereas, the Superintendent of Nurses and a number of nurses 
are living now in private homes due to the fact that the hospital does 
not have room for them in the hospital building or nurses' home; and, 

Whereas, the small dining room, with a capacity of about 46 is 
forced to accommodate about 80, which necessitates the serving of six 
meals a day instead of three ; and, 

Whereas, the hospital's small storage rooms are entirely inadequate 



Annual of Session 1935 37 

and churches and individuals are now wanting to furnish quantities 
of canned fruits and vegetables, with nowhere to store them ; and, 

Whereas, the Board of Trustees of the North Carolina Baptist Hos- 
pitals, Inc. is desirous of securing authority from the North Carolina 
Baptist State Convention to re-finance the bonded debt of the said 
North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Inc. in order that the Board of 
Trustees of the hospital may enlarge the hospital if they find they can 
do so without in any way involving the Baptist denomination or the 
Baptist State Convention in any further debt ; and, 

Whereas, the said Board of Trustees of the North Carolina Baptist 
Hospitals, Inc. is desirous of obtaining authority from the North Caro- 
lina Baptist State Convention to re-finance, if the hospital can effect 
a substantial saving, even in case the hospital is not enlarged. 

In consideration of the premises the Board of Trustees of North 
Carolina Baptist Hospitals. Inc., respectfully asks, as follows : 

1. For authority from the North Carolina Baptist State Conven- 
tion to re-finance the bonded debt of the North Carolina Baptist Hos- 
pitals, (which was $125,000.00 and is now $64,000.00) in order that 
the Board of Trustees of said hospital may enlarge the hospital if they 
find they can do so without in any way involving the denomination or 
North Carolina Baptist State Convention in any further debt. 

2. For authority from the North Carolina Baptist State Convention 
to re-finance, if the hospital can effect a substantial saving, even in 
case the hospital is not enlarged. 

Respectfully submitted by order of the Board of Trustees of North 
Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated. 

E. L. Davis, Chairman, 

A. Wayland Cooke, Secretary. 

49. A message in song "Make Me a Blessing" came from 
Edward E. Rutledge, Associate Pastor, First Baptist Church, 
Charlotte. 

50. As the special order here was the report of the Woman's 
Missionary Society. (See page 117, section 135). Prior 
thereto and in appreciative recognition of fifty years of splen- 
did service by Mrs. \Y. N. Jones, State W. M. U. President, 
and the work of the Baptist women in the State a committee 
composed of B. W. Spilman, D. H. Wilcox, J. M. Justice, 
T. H. King, and C. M. Wall were named by the President 
to submit a suitable resolution recognizing this service. The 
resolution as afterwards submitted reads : 



38 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

A Resolution 

Fifty Years Service of Mrs. Wesley N. Jones and the 
North Carolina Women's Missionary Union 

Whereas, the Baptist Woman's Missionary Union is Auxiliary to 
the North Carolina Baptist State Convention and, 

Whereas, as a State-Wide organization it completes this year fifty 
years of unusual service and, 

Whereas, Mrs. W. N. Jones, of Raleigh, has been actively identified 
with this work since its organization. 

Therefore, Be it Resolved, That the Baptist State Convention of 
North Carolina place on record an expression of deep appreciation for 
the splendid services rendered by the Woman's Missionary Union of 
North Carolina under the capable leadership of Mrs. W. N. Jones. 

That the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina place on record 
an expression of deep appreciation for the services rendered by Mrs. 
W. N. Jones and by the women who through the years have labored 
in the W. M. U. of the state. 

Prior to 1886, according to the available records, there were ten 
missionary societies among the Baptist women of North Carolina. 

In January of that year a group of fifteen interested women met in 
Raleigh in the office of Rev. C. T. Bailey, D.D., editor of the Biblical 
Recorder, and organized the Woman's Central Committee of Missions. 
Two young women, members of the First Baptist Church, Raleigh, 
teachers in a mission Sunday school near the south end of Fayetteville 
street, were selected to lead this new movement. Miss Fannie E. S. 
Heck was chosen president and Miss Sallie Bailey, corresponding secre- 
tary. 

Miss Bailey was the only daughter of Rev. C. T. Bailey, D.D. In 
1887 she was married to Wesley Norwood Jones, a rising young attorney 
of Raleigh. A large volume would be necessary to record the splendid 
services rendered by this consecrated husband and his noble wife. 

Beginning with no funds, no office, no definite program, no study 
courses and often with slight interest on the part of the friends of the 
movement and open hostility on the part of many who should have 
been deeply sympathetic with it, the young corresponding secretary of 
the Central Committee gave herself unceasingly to the task of setting 
forward the work. 

During these fifty years Mrs. Jones has been at the very heart and 
center of this work. She served as corresponding secretary only two 
years the first time but was again called to this important post in 1900. 

In 1891, in Goldsboro, the state Woman's Missionary Union was 
organized. In various capacities Mrs. Jones has given of her time, 



Annual of Session 1935 39 

her talents, her money to this work. She has served faithfully and well 
through the years. As corresponding secretary, treasurer, state vice- 
president for the Southern Baptist W. M. U., trustee of the Training 
School, vice-president of the State W. M. U. and since 1916 as president 
of the State W. M. U. she has rendered an outstanding service. 

Her ability, her wide information in the missionary field, her 
humble self-sacrifice, her whole-hearted devotion to the work combine 
to make her an ideal leader. 

The marvelous growth of the work of the W. M. U. in the state 
is a tribute to her and to the loyal, faithful host of women who with a 
whole-hearted support have willingly followed her leadership. 

To Mrs. Jones and the faithful women associated with her the 
Baptist State Convention of North Carolina expresses grateful apprecia- 
tion. 

B. W. Spilman, Chairman, 

D. H. Wilcox, 
J. M. Justice, 
T. H. King, 

C. M. Wall. 

51. Acknowledging this recognition Mrs. Jones read the 
report and upon motion to adopt Mrs. Edna R. Harris, Ra- 
leigh, W. M. U. Corresponding Secretary and Miss Mary 
Currin, Young People's Leader, spoke to the report to be 
adopted thereafter. 

52. In keeping with the report of the North Carolina Bap- 
tist Foundation as adopted (see page 25, section 21) Eugene 
I. Olive submitted a resolution and upon motion by Brother 
Olive the resolution was adopted. 

Resolved that the Directors of the North Carolina Baptist Founda- 
tion be authorized to make all necessary procedure to secure amend- 
ments to the Charter of the Foundation so as to provide : 

a. For a change in the time of the annual meeting of the Directors 
to the Tuesday following the second Monday in October, in place 
of the present date. 

b. To give the Directors more definite authority to compromise 
and adjust debts or obligations owing to the Foundation or any of its 
trust funds, whenever in their judgment and discretion, such adjust- 
ment or compromise is in the best interest of the Foundation and its 
funds. 

c. To increase the number of Directors from 5 to 15, three mem- 
bers being elected each year for a term of five years and to provide 
for an Executive Committee of the Board of Directors. 



40 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

53. A special selection was given by the Mars Hill Or- 
chestra. 

54. E. McNeill Poteat, Raleigh read the report to Memorial- 
ize Congress on the subject of War. The report which follows 
which carries a minority report as to certain provisions was 
upon motion by Brother Poteat adopted by the convention. 

To the Southern Baptist Convention : 

RESOLUTION UPON THE SUBJECT OF WAR 

Following the presentation of the annual report of the Social Ser- 
vice Committee of the North Carolina State Baptist Convention, the 
following resolution was adopted : 

"We recommend the appointment of a committee to memorialize 
Congress on this subject, to secure the widest publicity in the secular 
and religious press of America, and to present appropriate resolutions 
at the next meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention". 

Pursuant to the foregoing instructions the committee presents here- 
with to the Southern Baptist Convention the resolutions as agreed upon 
by the majority of the committee appointed. 

1. Recalling the celebrated Baptist tradition concerning the freedom 
and supremacy of the conscience, we believe that certain attitudes 
recently advocated by high officials of our government make imperative 
the reaffirmation of this doctrine. The imposition of the test of military 
service as a qualification for citizenship, the requirement of military 
training in certain of our tax- supported institutions and the treatment 
of those who conscientiously object to such forced instruction are 
denials of the right of the individual to follow the dictates of conscience 
in the matter of war. 

2. We believe that the war system which seems to be the chief 
reliance of the nations for the settlement of international disputes is 
not only futile, but irreconcilably opposed to the mind of Christ; and 
that Congress should therefore devise at once policies controlling the 
manufacture and sale of munitions, policies that pronounce the govern- 
ment unwilling to use the army and navy to protect the properties of 
our national abroad ; and policies that will assure the world of our 
determination to make no use of our military services except in defen- 
sive action. In the event of future war we would like to insist that all 
the services incident to the conduct of war be conscripted by the govern- 
ment in order that no profit shall be made out of war. It is unthinkable 
that while the nation is prosecuting a war, human life should be con- 
scripted and destroyed, and that in that very destruction, money profit 



Annual of Session 1935 41 

should accrue to any enterprise or individual furnishing the sinews of 
combat. 

Signed : E. McNeill Poteat, Jr., Chairman, 

J. Clyde Turner, 

B. W. Spilman, 

T. D. Kitchin, 

Arthur J. Barton, 

E. Yates Webb, 

L. E. M. Freeman. 

MINORITY REPORT 

There was a third paragraph which the majority of the committee 
could not conscientiously sign. It is affixed hereto as a minority report. 

3. We further believe that the root of the war system and its wide 
spread implications for confusion and evil, is the competitive economic 
order under which our world is trying to operate. So long as personal 
profit dominates business, competition — beneficent if possible, ruthless if 
necessary — will be the method of all economic operations. This we have 
come to feel makes it difficult — if not impossible — to apply thoroughly 
the mind of Christ to our social complex. We therefore would urge 
our people to give themselves seriously to thought along these lines, 
with a purpose of amending or modifying the present economic order 
that it may definitely come under the domination of the mind of Christ 
Jesus. 

Signed : L. E. M. Freeman, 

E. McNeill Poteat, Jr. 

55. Social Service and Civic Righteousness Report was 
also read by E. McNeill Poteat, Chairman, Raleigh, and was 
discussed by the following brethren : J. C. Owen, Luther Little, 
J. A. McKaughan, Wilson W. Woodcock and J. H. Harwood, 
and adopted by the convention upon motion by Brother Poteat. 

REPORT SOCIAL SERVICE AND CIVIC RIGHTEOUSNESS 

There are certain drifts in our national life that are distinctly reflected 
in the life of our State. It would not be difficult to adduce evidence 
from widely separated areas that support the assertion that there is 
much uncertainty about great social issues, and perhaps a somewhat 
retrograde tendency in some of the efforts to modify and correct this 
wide-spread social restlessness. 

The three areas anxiety is most acute are those of political activity, 
economics and national defense. Statutes have been passed in sixteen 
states during the last twelve months requiring an oath of allegiance to 



42 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

the Constitution and a periodic salute to the national flag by every 
state employee and public school teacher and student. This book harm- 
less enough until it is seen to go to the absurd excesses that have oc- 
curred in Massachusetts, and until it is found to be another symptom 
of the hysteria that seems to grip certain public officials. Congress had 
eighteen anti-sedition laws before it during its latest session, all of 
which have the effect, virtually, of destroying the rights of free assembly, 
free speech, and a free press as they have been guaranteed by the U. S. 
Constitution and cherished as a great American tradition. 

So far as this national tendency is observable in North Carolina it 
is not, we believe, due to insincerity or malice on the part of those 
who sponsor such sentiments. We believe, however, that their advocacy 
is definitely subversive of the elemental freedom which lies at the base 
of our democratic structure. We call therefore on the North Carolina 
State Baptist Convention to deprecate by official resolution the activities 
of the variously called 100% American organizations that seek to 
abrogate the civil liberties under which all of us have a right to live. 
This means, specifically the use of the National Guard to suppress 
strikes ; the statute which virtually denied political groups other than 
the two dominant parties the use of the ballot ; the apparent abridgement 
of the constitutional right to the writ of Habeas Corpus by prisoners 
indicted for alleged political crimes ; the application of gag-rule against 
political agitators ; and the inhuman and brutal treatment of prisoners 
as it has been indulged in some penal institutions and detention camps. 

It is difficult often to disentangle political action from economic 
causes and consequences. But we believe that since North Carolina is 
the second largest agricultural state in the South, and is being indus- 
trialized faster than any other Southern state, we ought to be alert to 
discover how and where economic interests within and without the state 
— particularly those concerned with tobacco, cotton and alcoholic bev- 
erage manufacture — tend to exert undue and unwarranted pressure on 
political action in the state, in order that our protest may be widely 
and intelligently made. 

We view with growing concern the tides of indifference to the 
alcohol-beverage evil that more and more threaten to engulf the Christian 
conscience of the state. The sinister and persistent influence of the 
advertising of alcoholic drinks, particularly the use of wholly erroneous 
statements which purport to be scientifically exact and that seek — in the 
name of health — to enlarge the consumption of alcohol — such advertising 
being increasingly prominent in the daily press of the state — is an omi- 
nous sign needing alert attention and decisive rebuke. The consequences 
of this are seen in increasing drunkenness and the ghastly loss of life 
from motor-car accidents, and a laxity of social restraints that permits 
convivial drinking on an increasingly larger scale. A similar criticism 




JOHN D. BERRY 

Born in Camden County, North Carolina, November 27, 1883, the son of Charles 
D., and Martha Jane (Duncan) Berry. Attended the public schools of Camden 
County. Married Martha Levora Bray, of Surry County, October 14, 1908. 
Children: Martha Louise and John and James Guy, deceased. For many years 
connected with the Grand Lodge of Odd Fellows, first as Assistant Secretary, 
1906-1917, then as Secretary, 1917-1926; Moderator of the Raleigh Baptist Associa- 
tion, 1924-1934; Member of the Baptist General or Mission Board for twenty-five 
years; Senior Deacon Tabernacle Church, Raleigh. His death occurred on the 
afternoon of July 25, 1935 at his residence in Raleigh. 



Annual of Session 1935 43 

might be made of the advertising of cigarettes. We urge, therefore, 
that this paragraph of the report be regarded as a pronouncement of the 
North Carolina State Convention supporting the prohibition movement ; 
as calling on our people to stand resolutely against the manufacture, 
sale and use of beverage alcohol, and as a forth-right protest against 
the perfidious advertising that misleads and corrupts the public mind 
regarding the use of alcoholic beverages. 

We deplore both the use of indecent and profane language in our 
daily press which seems to be occurring with increasing frequency, and 
the printing of news-pictures which in some instances are inelegant if not 
infrequently revolting. We would call on the Press of the State to 
undertake to restore that independence and dignity which made the 
American newspaper great in former years, and the loss of which is at 
once partly the cause and the index of the decline of the public morale. 

We believe that the past six years have fairly demonstrated that our 
economic order is not only faulty, but prolific of much of our political 
and moral unrest. We feel, therefore, that Christian people ought to give 
careful thought to the relation of the Christian Evangel to the fields of 
economic theory and practice, in order that a more just distribution of 
the rewards of honest labor may be effected. To this end we suggest 
a study of the Cooperative Movement and the possible organization of 
cooperatives. This movement is gaining considerable impetus both in our 
state and the world at large, and we would commend the efforts of our 
government already made in that direction. 

We cannot permit the program of the Federal government to further 
militarize our youth by the establishment of High School R. O. T. C. 
units without grave misgiving; and we would respectfully urge again 
our protest against the military courses in our state schools being con- 
tinued as a compulsory feature of college curricula. To what measure 
this military program is reflected in our common tolerance of the stag- 
gering federal budget for military and naval expenditure we do not 
know ; but we cannot forbear to repudiate the mind that asserts either 
the need or the wisdom of such peace-time outlay. 

We note with satisfaction a distinct improvement in the quality of 
motion picture production, due, we believe, to the nationwide protest 
over the past two years against salacious and demoralizing performances. 
We would express our satisfaction that the tendencies in modern gov- 
ernment seem to be focusing concern on the dispossessed and the victims 
of economic displacement. We are gratified to observe a better under- 
standing of our obligations toward the Negro as a citizen with political 
rights equal to our own, and commend the efforts of those who are 
working for the growing improvement of race-relations in our common- 
wealth, not forgetting — in the meantime — that we are far from having 
accomplished our whole duty therein. 



44 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

One need that grows annually more acute is the care of the men 
and women discharged from our penal institutions. At the present time 
between four and six hundred are turned back into civilian life every 
month from our state penitentiary, prison camps and institutions for 
delinquent youth. This makes an annual total of about 6,000 persons 
who must either find a place in a social stratum that will aid them in the 
recovery of their respectability and establish them as useful citizens, 
or in a stratum that will confirm them to a life of further crime and 
delinquency. Over a period of ten years that means sixty thousand 
persons bearing the stigma of a criminal penalty passing back into 
society, to be assimilated as an asset or cast out as a liability. So 
far as we know there is no organized effort to deal with these dis- 
charged prisoners from the day they leave the custody of the state until 
they reestablish their social contacts. Since the critical period in the 
life of such persons is the first few days of their long-hoped-for freedom, 
we recommend that the Convention make definite provision for a study of 
our obligations to this group, with a view to the presentation of a plan 
for dealing vigorously with the problem. 

We believe that the Gospel has two foci of concern ; one is the love 
of God as mediated through Christ, and the other is the love of man 
for man as revealed by Christ. The Christian experience is autonomous ; 
it stands in its own individual right. It is also social ; it lays obligatfons 
on individual Christians to act in a specified Christian manner. We 
must not allow anything to dispute or falsify our independent experience 
of Christ. At the same time we must explore and employ the spiritual 
forces of love, mutual aid, and cooperative service, to the end that every 
area of our common life shall be sanctified and enriched by the power 
of the divine Grace. 

To such fraternal relations with other Christian groups as this 
obligation compels us we would gladly offer our support and participa- 
tion ; and to such personal commitments as the full gospel demands of 
us as individuals, we do gladly yield ourselves in the name of Christ. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Edwin McNeill Poteat, Jr., Chairman, 

E. Norfleet Gardner, 

J. L. Peacock, 

Miss Hattie Edwards. 

56. The Convention adopted a resolution submitted by 
J. M. Page which read: 

PROHIBITION RESOLUTION 

Whereas the Liquor Forces secured the enactment of a bill in the 
last General Assembly of North Carolina legalizing liquor stores in 
seventeen counties of North Carolina ; 



Annual of Session 1935 45 

And whereas this has caused an increase of immorality and crime 
shown by court records; 

And whereas the liquor forces are seeking by every effort and means 
to secure legislation in every County of the State ; 

Therefore Be It Resolved, that we the Baptist State Convention of 
North Carolina pledge our personal influence and active effort in every 
honorable way possible to prevent the enactment of a liquor law allow- 
ing liquor stores in every county of the State, and to secure the repeal 
of the present liquor law by which intoxicating liquors are sold in the 
seventeen counties ; that we pledge our united support and financial aid 
to the United Dry Forces of North Carolina which has done a valiant 
and effective work and to the W. C. T. U., to the end that the balance of 
North Carolina may be kept dry and the black spot in these seventeen 
counties may be removed. 

57. An offering in the amount of $19.55 was received in 
the interest of the United Dry Forces of North Carolina upon 
motion by F. M. Hilliard, High Point. 

58. At this time J. M. McKaughan, Sherwood, gave notice 
that he would on tomorrow introduce a resolution to change the 
opening date of the Convention from Tuesday after the 2nd 
Sunday in November to Tuesday after the 3rd Sunday in 
January. 

59. Upon motion by E. C. Kolb, the Convention instructed 
the Committee on Committees to report out a special committee 
of five to make a study of what might be done with reference 
to former prisoners and report at the next Convention. 

60. With prayer by A. J. Barton the session stood ad- 
journed. 

THURSDAY— Morning Session 

61. President Wall requested that the morning session open 
with Brother Seefeldt leading the Convention in the singing 
of "Break Thou the Bread of Life". 

62. The morning worship continued with N. C. Teague, 
Winston- Salem leading with Scripture and prayer and the con- 
vention singing "My Jesus I Love Thee". 

63. Wednesday's Journal was read by Secretary Deane and 
approved. 



46 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

64. Arthur J. Barton, read the following resolution, moved 
its adoption and was ordered recorded upon motion by Brother 
Barton and the direction of the Convention. 

FUNDAMENTAL BAPTIST BELIEF AND DOCTRINE 

Whereas, it is always appropriate for any Baptist body to reaffirm 
any fundamental Baptist belief and doctrine, and 

Whereas, owing to certain tendencies is some sections of our coun- 
try we deem it especially appropriate at the present time to reaffirm our 
Baptist position on the vital matters dealt with in these resolutions, 
now therefore, 

Be it resolved by the North Carolina Baptist State Convention in 
annual session assembled in the City of Asheville, N. C, 

(1) That we hereby reaffirm our belief in, acceptance of and devo- 
tion to the plain teachings of the New Testament that a local congre- 
gation of baptised believers, covenanted together for public worship, for 
the observance of the ordinances and for the proclamation of the gospel 
constitutes and it alone does constitute a New Testament Church; 

(2) That we reaffirm our belief in, acceptance of and devotion to the 
New Testament teaching that such local congregation of baptised believ- 
ers is the only ecclesiastical body recognized in the New Testament and 
that such body is autonomous and complete and has full authority over 
all its affairs ; 

(3) That to such body is committed all authority over all ecclesiasti- 
cal acts, such as the ordination of elders and deacons, the calling and 
settling of pastors, the administration of the ordinances and the decision 
of all questions and the transaction of all business which concerns its 
interest and work, as it acts under Christ the head of the Church ; 

(4) That Baptist Associations and Conventions are only means and 
agencies of cooperation through which the churches may act for the 
better accomplishment of the missionary, educational and benevolent 
tasks committed to the churches by our risen Lord ; 

(5) That associations and conventions do not have and under no 
conditions should attempt to exercise authority over the churches or to 
interfere with them in the performance of any and all of their func- 
tions as New Testament Churches ; 

(6) That the agencies and agents of this convention be and they 
are hereby instructed scrupulously to regard the principles set forth 
in these resolutions and jealously to respect the autonomy, independence 
and rights of each Baptist Church in all of these matters and not to 
advocate any theory or program that would in any way conflict, or 
seem to conflict, with these fundamental Baptist principles ; 

(7) That concerning the ordination of ministers we deem it would 



Annual of Session 1935 47 

be a violation of these principles for any Baptist body, local or general, 
aside from a Baptist Church, to set up ordaining presbyteries or to 
undertake to exercise any authority over the churches in such matters ; 
(8) On the other hand, with no assumption of authority, we express 
the hope that our Baptist Churches will exercise the care and caution 
enjoined in the New Testament concerning the ordination of ministers, 
and we believe that the spirit of proper comity among Baptist Churches 
would forbid that any one church shall proceed with the ordination of a 
minister, though it has the right so to do, without inviting neighboring 
sister churches to send elders and deacons to help form the presby- 
tery and sit in council with the church concerning so vital and important 
a matter which must needs affect our whole denominational life. 

Signed : Arthur J. Barton, 
D. M. Clemmons, 

A. B. Wood, 
John E. Lanier, 
R. H. Satterfield, 

B. W. Spilman, 

J. Marcus Kester, 
T. H. King, 
Austin B. Conrad. 

65. At 10:30 this morning the report on the Report of the 
General Board will be received following the suggestion of 
General Secretary Huggins. 

66. A report on the Laymen's Convention Committee was 
received as read by John T. Coley, Rocky Mount, with Secre- 
tary Huggins presiding, The report was adopted upon motion 
by Brother Coley after the General Secretary introduced and 
Walt N. Johnson, Mars Hill, spoke to the report. 

THE LAYMEN'S CONVENTION COMMITTEE 

At the last session of the Convention it created a committee to be 
known as a Layman's Convention Committee, and consisting of R. N. 
Simms, Chairman, Raleigh; John T. Coley, Rocky Mount; T. A. Avera, 
Rocky Mount ; Grover H. Jones, High Point ; John D. Berry, Raleigh ; 
Dr. C. H. Durham, Lumberton ; M. Leslie Davis, Beaufort; Dr. Ira 
D. S. Knight, Durham ; Dr. William Harrison Williams, Charlotte ; and 
Judge Johnson J. Hayes, Greensboro. 

Early in the year the committee met to consider the wisdom of 
calling a general state meeting. After canvassing the situation it was 
decided to promote such a meeting, but instead of referring to laymen 



48 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

only it was. decided to call it a "Baptist Men's Meeting", and invite both 
pastors and laymen ; and Greensboro was selected as the place for the 
purpose. 

Accordingly much time was spent in arranging a program and pre- 
paring for the meeting. It was held on April 2 and 3, 1935 ; and we are 
happy to report that it was a great success from every viewpoint. 
Baptist men came from almost every section of the state. More than 
700 were in attendance. Three sessions of about three and one-half 
hours each were held. A rich and varied program was presented, with 
every person present to perform his appointment. 

Without question the men went awaj' aroused and stimulated to 
attempt greater things in their churches and for the Kingdom at large. 

Subsequently similar meetings for men were held in various sections 
of the state, notably in the Kings Mountain, Stanly and Johnston Asso- 
ciations. 

We recommend that a committee, which we believe should be called 
"Baptist Men's Convention Committee", be named by this Convention. 
We further recommend that the committee be asked to promote next year 
a series of Baptist men's meetings in various sections of the state and 
also, if they think wise, one general meeting, possibly at Ridgecrest 
during the summer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. N. Simms, Chairman. 

67. Sunday School Secretary Perry Morgan was requested 
and he presented T. L. Holcomb, Executive Secretary of the 
Southern Baptist Sunday School Board, Nashville. Tenn., suc- 
cessor to I. J. Van Ness, who brought a stirring address on 
the work of the Board. 

68. Reading for the Committee to Report on the General 
Board's Report. Arthur J. Barton, Chairman, submitted the 
following which was sanctioned by the Convention upon motion 
by Brother Barton. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE REPORT OF THE 
GENERAL BOARD 

We, your committee, respectfully report as follows : 
1. The committee would express its heart}' appreciation and satis- 
faction at the general features of the report indicating growth in the 
several departments of our common work. Undoubtedly this increase 
is due in good measure to the sacrificial labors of the Board, of the 
General Secretarv, and of all the workers both in the office and in the 



Annual of Session 1935 49 

field. On the other hand we could not claim that all the growth is due 
to the Board and its servants, or even to the Convention. The com- 
mittee recognizes the fact that the growth in our Baptist enterprises 
depends, and must depend, upon the initiative, spirituality, consecration 
and aggressiveness of our Baptist pastors and churches. It is a com- 
monplace to say that we can never have a strong, cooperative Baptist 
life without well organized and consecrated Baptist churches. We re- 
joice in every sign of progress and hope that the several items of 
progress given in the report are but the earnest of a larger and better 
day which is dawning for our Baptist people in North Carolina and for 
all their work. 

2. Concerning the appropriations for Forest Avenue and Boone 
churches, (see pages 76 ff) the committee has taken into account and 
given careful consideration to all of the factors in each case. 

We recommend that the Board be authorized to appropriate $20,000 
to assist the Forest Avenue Church, Greensboro in the erection of its 
educational building, the amount to be paid in four equal, annual install- 
ments of $5,000 each, with the provision that if the progress made by 
the church in its building enterprise should justify and its income of 
current funds should enable the Board so to do, the whole amount may 
be paid in a shorter period of time. 

We recommend that the sum of $1,500 a year, over a period of ten 
years, be appropriated to assist the Boone church in its building enter- 
prise, with the same provision as to payment of the whole amount that 
we recommend concerning the Forest Avenue church. 

3. Concerning the general recommendations of the Board, (see 
page 116, section 134) of the Advance Report, your committee would 
recommend that 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 9 be adopted as presented. 

Concerning No. 6, we recommend that the Board be authorized 
to employ, within its discretion and as its income may justify, three 
general missionaries. 

Concerning No. 8, we recommend: (a) that the Board be instructed 
to cooperate wholeheartedly with the management of the Biblical 
Recorder for the largest possible increase in the circulation of the 
Recorder; (b) That the President of the Convention be, and he is here- 
by authorized, to appoint a committee of seven wise and discreet 
brethren to confer with the Biblical Recorder Publishing Company 
looking to the possible purchase of the Biblical Recorder by the Baptist 
State Convention. Your committee does not believe that denominational 
ownership is a cure all for all of the problems of publication and cir- 
culation of our Baptist papers, but since the editor of the Recorder has 
several times indicated before the Convention the willingness of the 
owners of the Biblical Recorder to sell the Recorder to the Convention, 
we deem it wise for the Convention to appoint such committee as we 



50 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

here recommend, that the whole matter may be gone into carefully and a 
report brought to the next meeting of the Convention. 

Concerning No. 9, we would add this special word to express the 
hope that with undivided mind and heart our people may set themselves 
to the task of reaching the goal, or objective, of $600,000 for our com- 
mon enterprises during the year 1936. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Arthur J. Barton, Chairman, 

D. H. Wilcox, 
Eugene I. Olive, 

E. B. Jenkins, 
L. R. O'Brien. 

69. It was the order of the Convention upon motion by 
D. H. Wilcox, that future reports of the Committee on Social 
Service and Civic Righteousness be included as a matter of 
information and study in the Advance Report of the General 
Board. 

70. As the special order Eugene I. Olive, Chairman of the 
State Promotion Executive Committee presided and opened the 
discussion on the Co-operative Program (see pages 108 ff) and 
was followed by General Secretary Maloy A. Huggins, and 
Promotion Secretary Perry Morgan. 

In turn the three State Missionaries J. C. Pipes, in the 
Western, Charles H. Dickey, of the Central, and M. O. Alex- 
ander, of the Eastern sections of the State brought most en- 
couraging evidences of a new enlistment among the Baptist 
people of North Carolina. 

At the request of Brother Pipes, Luther Van, of Spruce 
Pine, of the Mitchell Association, and Otto Parham, Asheville, 
of the Buncombe Association, attested to the work as outlined 
by Brother Pipes and Brother Alexander, heard able testimony 
of similiar work in his area from W. P. Crouch, Morganton, 
of the Catawba Association, W. R. Grigg, Marion, of the Blue 
Ridge Association, Charlie Parker, Winston-Salem of the 
Pilot Mountain Association, and J. P. Davis, Burnsville, of the 
Yadkin Association. 

71. President Wall well expressed the feelings of the Con- 
vention to the wives of our State Workers for the sacrifice they 



Annual of Session 1935 51 

are making in giving their companions so much of the time 
to the Baptist Cause and Christ in the State. 

72. A topic "Why I Believe in the Co-operative Program" 
was the subject of an address heard here from F. M. Powell, 
Professor of Church History, Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary, Louisville. 

73. J. R. Robbins, Harris, evangelistic singer, led in the 
singing of "Amazing Grace". 

74. A committee at the 1934 State Convention was au- 
thorized (See page 42, section 49, 1934 annual) to study and 
report on the tenure of office of Board and Trustee members. 
This Committee now through the Chairman J. L. Peacock read 
the report with reference to the change in the Constitution 
effecting the election of Board Members or Trustees, which 
follows in two divisions : 

A RESOLUTION 
DIVISION I 

Your Committee held two meetings and discussed thoroughly the 
Resolution presented by Brother Gardner and the Amendment pre- 
sented by Brother Arch Cree. 

Your Committee first considered the Resolution and were unani- 
mous in the opinion that it would make for the welfare of the Con- 
vention to adopt the Resolution. In discussing the Amendment, there 
was some difference of opinion. In order that the Committee might 
have the fullest information possible, we called in several representa- 
tives of our various Boards to ascertain what effect the system of rota- 
tion might have on the efficiency of the personnel of their Boards. Each 
representative was positive that rotation would be unwise, and in some 
cases disastrous. All agreed that the work of their Boards would 
suffer were the system of rotation adopted. 

Your Committee, therefore, unanimously recommends the adoption 
only of the Gardner resolution. 

We suggest that our Institutions be purged of Trustees who do not 
function. We recommend that the Committee on Nominations investi- 
gate the members of the Board as to their interest and efficiency and 
that if it is found that a member is absent from two consecutive meet- 
ings of the Board without excuse that he be dropped from the Board. 

We further suggest that the Committee on Nominations seeks to have 
a wider representation on our Boards by selecting members from vari- 
ous parts of the state. 



52 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

A RESOLUTION 
DIVISION II 

Resolved that Article V, Section 1 of the Constitution be amended 
to read as follows : 

That retiring members of the Board be ineligible for reelection until 
the following meeting of the State Convention. 

Upon motion by T. H. King, the resolution as presented 
under Division was adopted as was the resolution as recorded 
under Division II after motion by J. L. Peacock. 

75. At 12 :00 o'clock, noon, Millard A. Jenkins brought his 
second and last address. 

76. T. L. Holcomb, Nashville, Tenn., offered prayer and 
the session adjourned. 

THURSDAY— Afternoon Session 

77. "Come Thou Fount" was the song that opened the 
Thursday afternoon session and then C. R. Pittard. Apex, 
brought the devotional thoughts. 

78. In the absence of a report on the Biblical Recorder 
Advisory Council, C. H. Durham, made his report as Chair- 
man of the Committee to Nominate Trustees of the Conven- 
tion, its Institutions and Members of the General Board, and 
upon motion to adopt by Brother Durham the following recom- 
mendations are recorded : 

General Board — Members 

Term Expiring 1936 — R. P. Noble, Raleigh, for John D. Berry, 
Raleigh, deceased ; Vance Browning, Bryson City, for R. W. Pre- 
vost, left the State ; Hugh A. Ellis, Wilson, for Charles H. Dickey, 
Raleigh, Representative Board; Zeno Wall, Shelby, ex-officio; C. B. 
Deane, Rockingham, ex-officio. 

Term Expiring 1937 — D. H. Wilcox. Winston-Salem, for John 
R. Jester, left the State; E. H. Potts, Elizabeth City, for J. L. 
Carrick, left the State ; E. N. Gardner, Dunn, for E. J. Britt, 
Lumberton, Trustee Wake Forest College. 

Term Expiring 1938— John W. Suttle, Shelby; Trela D. Collins, 
Durham; Mrs. C. D. Bain, Dunn; J. B. Grice, West Asheville; J. 
B. Willis, Hamlet; A. P. Stephens, Morehead City; J. R. Morgan, 
Waynesville; J. H. Highsmith, Raleigh; J. E. Kirk, Rosemary; W. 



Annual of Session 1935 53 

D. Poe, Oxford; E. Gibson Davis, Asheville ; Clifton J. Allen, Fair- 
mont ; Paul P. Davis, Yadkinville ; A. H. Casey, North Wilkesboro ; 
Roy D. Campbell, Wing; A. B. Wood, Maxton. 

I. Baptist State Convention — Trustees 

Term Expiring 1936— R. L. McMillan, Raleigh; William Louis 
Poteat, Wake Forest; F. H. Brooks, Smithfield. 

II. Baptist Foundation — Directors 

Term Expiring 1936 — Z. M. Caveness, Raleigh; Irvin Carlyle, 
Winston-Salem ; Luther Little, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1937 — J. L. Peacock, Tarboro ; Bruce Benton, 
Rockingham ; Oscar Haywood, New Bern. 

Term Expiring 1938 — Carl V. Tyner, Leaksville ; J. R. Morgan, 
Waynesville ; A. J. Smith, Goldsboro. 

Term Expiring 1939 — J. D. Wilkins, Greensboro; Carl M. Town- 
send, Raleigh ; E. M. Johnson. Lumberton. 

Term Expiring 1940 — T. S. Johnson, Raleigh; Mrs. J. B. Spil- 
man, Greenville; Mrs. Paul P. Davis, Yadkinville. 

III. Baptist Hospital — Trustees 

Term Expiring 1939— Mrs. Ruth Roddick, Winston-Salem; Mrs. 
J. F. Lethco, Charlotte ; Fielding Combs, Winston-Salem. 

IV. Baptist. Orphanage of North Carolina — Trustees 

Term Expiring 1937 — T. H. Broyhill, Lenoir, for Thomas Car- 
rick, High Point, deceased. 

Term Expiring 1939 — B. W. Spilman, Kinston ; C. L. Haywood, 
Durham ; T. P. Pruitt, Hickory ; Mrs. Fannie Moore, Gastonia. 

V. Campbell College — Trustees 

Term Expiring 1937— S. F. Teague, Goldsboro, for J. C. Clifford, 
Dunn, deceased. 

Term Expiring 1939 — John W. Holmes, Farmville ; Fred N. Day, 
Winston-Salem; R. B. Wilkins, Durham; R. M. Olive, Fayetteville ; 
A. P. Stephens, Morehead City. 

VI. Chowan College — Trustees 

Term Expiring 1936 — W. D. Boone, Winton, for J. G. Standi, 
Margaretsville, deceased. 

Term Expiring 1939 — J. P. Holoman, Weldon; W. L. Curtis, 
Ahoskie; Wayland Mitchell, Lewiston ; J. M. Duncan, Murfrees- 
boro ; E. L. Wells, Edenton. 



54 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

VII. Mars Hill College— Trustees 

Term Expiring 1936 — J. B. Efird, Charlotte, for D. A. Greene, 
Bakersville, deceased. 

Term Expiring 1939 — J. R. Owen, Asheville : Mrs. W. E. Logan, 
West Asheville : J. B. Grice, West Asheville ; J. R. Sams, Mars 
Hill: Thos. L. Johnson. Asheville: W. H. Hipps. Asheville; R. K. 
Redwine. Hickory. 

VIII. Meredith College — Trustees 

Term Expiring 1937 — B. A. Bowers. Gastonia, for W. A. Avers, 
Forest City. 

Term Expiring 1938 — Mrs. Lily Morehead Mebane. Spray, for 
J. M. W. Hicks, Raleigh, resigned. 

Term Expiring 1939— T. A. Avera, Rocky Mount: Oscar Creech, 
Ahoskie ; W. H. Weatherspoon. Raleigh ; WTlliam Louis Poteat, 
Wake Forest : Mrs. Maude Davis Bunn. Raleigh ; W. D. Poe. Ox- 
ford : J. T. J. Battle, Greensboro. 

IX. Wake Forest College — Trustees 

Term Expiring 1937 — Charles B. Deane, Rockingham, for D. G. 
Brummitt. Oxford, deceased. 

Term Expiring 1939 — C. O. Bridger. Bladenboro ; C. H. Dur- 
ham. Lumberton ; J. Bivens Helms, Morganton : F. P. Hobgood, 
Greensboro : G. A. Norwood, Goldsboro ; R. E. Royall, Wake Forest ; 
John Arch McMillan, Thomasville : Germain Bernard, Durham. 

Upon motion to adopt. \Y. H. Moore. Wadesboro. offered 
an amendment to the motion that it be the policy of the Con- 
vention that no individual be asked to serve on two or more 
Boards ; 

An amendment to the amendment was offered by J. Ben 
Eller, that the motion by Brother Moore applv to the elections 
of 1936; 

\\ hereupon the amendment to the amendment received the 
approving vote of the Convention, and thereafter the Conven- 
tion passed the amendment as offered by Brother Moore ; 

Moreover the report of the Committee to nominate Trustees 
of the Convention, Its Institutions, and Members of the Gen- 
eral Board was duly approved. 

79. Vice-President R. E. Brickhouse. Warrenton, now 



Annual of Session 1935 55 

presiding announced the time for the election of the Con- 
vention officers. 

(a) It was the unanimous vote of the Convention that Recording 
Secretary Deane, cast the vote for President of the Convention for 
Zeno Wall, Shelby, upon motion by J. A. Snow, Wingate. The Secre- 
tary cast this vote and Brother Wall re-assumed the chair expressing 
in his splendid way feelings of deep appreciation. 

(b) B. G. Early, Kinston, moved the election of John T. Coley, 
Rocky Mount as First Vice-President ; J. P. Harris, moved that W. 
D. Poe, Oxford, be Second Vice-President and on motion by L. P. 
Smith, that B. E. Morris, act as Third Vice-President, these nominees 
were duly elected on one vote the Convention Vice-Presidents, after 
Sam F. Hudson, Red Springs, had moved that the nominations close. 

80. The Convention being appraised on Wednesday, J. A. 
McKaughan, Sherwood, now offers a resolution that will change 
paragraph III, Section I, of the Constitution to read : "The 
Convention shall meet annually on Tuesday after the second 
Sunday in January." 

It was the vote of the Convention to commit upon motion 
by J. Ben Eller, Greensboro, and that a Committee of five be 
named to study the proposed change and report at the next 
annual session. (See page 25, Section 22). 

81. Oscar Creech, Ahoskie, reported at this time that the 
General Board had received as a matter of information the 
report of its own Committee with reference to the North Caro- 
lina Council of Churches and the report had been tabled and 
that any action upon this work would come from the Conven- 
tion. This report was received and ordered recorded. 

82. Messrs. B. L. Mullinax, E. J. Davis, Ray Ingale. J. B. 
Mcintosh, Asheville First Church Quartet sang, "Tell Me the 
Story of Jesus". 

83. The work of State Mission under the direction of 
General Secretary Huggins (See pages 79 ft") was related here 
with Brother Huggins presiding. In this order came the fol- 
lowing workers presenting- different phases of the work. 

(a) T. W. Bray, Pleasant Garden, spoke on "What the Convention 
is Doing for the Missionary Pastors and Churches.'' 



56 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

(b) The aid being given to Mission Church buildings was the gen- 
eral theme of J. B. Benfield, Morganton. 

(c) Missionary W. H. Fitzgerald, to the Cherokee Indians in the 
West, spoke on the work in that field. 

(d) Then followed Wayne Williams, Oteen, Pastor to the Soldiers 
at the Federal Government Hospital. 

(e) Brother Huggins touched upon the work being done for the 
people at Samarcand and the State Sanatorium, by E. M. Harris, 
Aberdeen. 

(f ) The report on Student Work was reported by Miss Cleo Mitchell, 
Student Secretary. 

(g) Miss Winnie Ricket, State B. T. U. Secretary and her Assistant 
Miss Mabel Starnes appeared with their activities. 

(h) Sunday School Secretary Perry Morgan gave his report and 
his associate in the work Leonard L. Morgan was recognized as was 
approved workers Mrs. C. D. Bain. Dunn and Mrs. John B. Lane, 
Lenoir. 

(i) W. C. Summerville, Superintendent of the Negro General Bap- 
tist Convention of North Carolina, presented the work of his brethren. 

(j) M. O. Alexander. Board Missionary concluded the discussions. 

84. Thereafter A. J. Barton, Wilmington moved and the 
Convention ordered that the resolution adopted by the Negro 
General Baptist Convention in Wadesboro, October 31, 1935 be 
recorded. 

A RESOLUTION 

Whereas the white Baptists of this State of North Carolina have 
manifested a pronounced interest in the moral and spiritual development 
of the colored Baptists of this commonwealth, as shown in the financial 
aid they are giving us, and helping to make it possible for us to carry 
forward our religious activities through the Rev. W. C. Somerville, our 
Superintendent of education and missions. 

Therefore Be it Resolved, that we as members of this convention, 
tender sincere thanks and express our profound appreciation of the fine 
spirit of Christian liberality as shown in the financial help which is 
being given the colored Baptists of the State ; and in the meantime, we 
are praying for a closer cooperation in the expansion of the kingdom 
of grace. 

Song: "On Jordan's Stormy Banks." 

85. The reports from the Baptist Bible Institute, New 
Orleans and the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louis- 



Annual of Session 1935 57 

ville were respectively given by Wilson W. Woodcock, Greens- 
boro and Faculty Representative F. M. Powell, Louisville, Ky. 

86. Secretary Charles B. Deane read the following tele- 
gram : 

Louisville, Ky., November 14, 1935. 
M. A. Huggins, 
First Baptist Church, 
Asheville. 

Praying For a Great Convention Crown Christ Lord of All 

North Carolina Students Louisville Seminary. 

87. A motion by Wilson W. Woodcock and the vote of the 
Convention instructed Brother F. M. Powell to carry a love 
message from the Convention to our beloved Students at the 
Seminary and Training School at Louisville. 

88. President Wall named the following Committee as au- 
thorized by the Convention relative to the future usefulness and 
the wisdom of the Convention purchasing the Biblical Re- 
corder. 

C. H. Durham, Chairman, J. L. Peacock, L. L. Hatfield, Johnson J. 
Hayes, F. C. Feezor, A. J. Smith, and A. J. Barton. 

89. Prayer was offered by Wm. Harrison Williams and the 
Thursday afternoon session adjourned. 

THURSDAY— Evening Session 

90. The closing session of the Convention convened with 
the singing of "Jesus Saves" and thereafter W. H. Covert, 
Forest City led the worship service and W. A. Avers, prayed. 

91. The Committee on Resolutions made its report through 
Forrest C. Feezor and was adopted as follows upon motion by 
Brother Feezor: 

REPORT COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS 

Your Committee examined carefully the resolutions placed in its 
hands. 

First, That with reference to the resolution presented by the Trus- 
tees of the North Carolina Baptist Hospital, Inc. (see page 36, sec- 
tion 48) that if any refinancing or contemplated enlargement be done 



58 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

that it will not create any new debt for which the Baptist State Con- 
vention is directly or indirectly responsible. 

Second, We approve the resolution with reference to the proposed 
article of amendment to the Federal Constitution to prohibit sectarian 
appropriations. 

Third, The North Caroilna Baptist State Convention herewith ex- 
presses its deep appreciation of, and sincere gratitude for, the many 
courtesies extended to the Convention and its members by the First 
Baptist Church and all the Baptists of Asheville ; the many homes and 
hotels, by the Press, by radio and civil authorities, by the Police of the 
City of Asheville. and by the faculty and students of Mars Hill College. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Forrest C. Feezor, Chairman, 
Elbert N. Johnson, 
Wilson W. Woodcock. 

92. The Secretary was instructed upon motion by A. J. 
Barton that the part of the resolution pertaining to sectarian 
appropriations be transcribed and forwarded to each member 
of the North Carolina delegation in Congress. 

93. Chairman Don C. Young, of the Committee on En- 
rollment announced the final enrollment with seven hundred 
sixty registered delegates and forty-five visitors. 

94. R. E. Brickhouse read for the Committee on Publicity 
its report and moving its adoption the Convention so ordered. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLICITY 

On behalf of your committee it may be said that in no year in this 
decade have the activities of our Convention been so well publicized. 

To make this report brief: Before we came to Asheville advance pub- 
licity matter was sent out to 150 papers in every county of North 
Carolina. 

During the Convention Ashevi lie's three newspapers have given us 
the magnificent total of about forty full columns of publicity com- 
posed of Convention news stories and pictures. 

At the same time the Raleigh News & Obsrever, the Greensboro 
News, and the Charlotte Observer have featured the proceedings of 
this Convention daily on their front pages. 

On top of that this publicity department has worked in closest co- 
operation with the United States Press, located in this city, and that 
news disseminating agency has broadcast our proceedings here to the 
uttermost ends of the state. 



Annual of Session 1935 59 

In addition to that the Associated Press has carried daily reports, 
and it is safe to say that two millions of people in North Carolina have 
had an opportunity to know what we have been doing here. It may 
be added that all this publicity has cost us nothing, and that the state 
press is always anxious to receive and disseminate anything of interest 
that we do. 

Charles H. Dickey, Chairman. 

95. Chairman Louis S. Gaines, Lexington reported for 
the Committee on Time, Place, and Preacher for the 1936 
Session and immediately adopted upon motion by Brother 
Gaines, to-wit : 

Time: As prescribed by the Constitution. 

*Place: To be determined by the Executive Committee of the Con- 
vention. 

Preacher: Charles H. Durham, Lumberton. 

Alternate: J. A. Easley, Wake Forest. 

96. B. W. Spilman read and the Convention adopted the 
report of the Historical Commission. (See page 112, section 
132). 

97. A mixed quartet from the First Church composed of 
Miss Fucile Fitzgerald. Mrs. E. J. Davis, B. L. Mullinax 
and Frank Gough, sang "Nailed to the Cross", with Miss 
Kathryn King, organist accompanying. 

98. The Committee on Memorials brought its report 
through the Chairman, T. F. Sasser, which included the sub- 
mission of the names of the honored dead (see page 63) and 
that the likenesses of the following brethren Archibald John- 
son, John D. Berry and W. B. Edwards be placed in the 1935 
Annual. M. A. Alexander moved that the report be adopted 
and that the Annual be dedicated to Archibald Johnson, forty 
years Editor of Charity and Children. The Convention so 
approved. 

99. A report of the Trustees of the Convention was read 
by M. A. Huggins and approved by the Convention upon motion 
by Brother Huggins. 

* The Executive Committee upon invitation of the Churches of Durham voted 
that the 1936 Convention be held in that City at the First Baptist Church. 



60 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE BAPTIST STATE 
CONVENTION OF NORTH CAROLINA 

The Board, composed of W. L. Poteat, Wake Forest; R. L. Mc- 
Millan, Raleigh; and F. H. Brooks, Smithfield; was organized with 
W. L. Poteat, Chairman and R. L. McMillan, Secretary. 

During the year we have given considerable time and effort in con- 
nection with the will of O. L. Pittman, of Edgecombe County. There is 
involved in this estate a substantial sum of money and the Trustees 
claim that under a proper interpretation of the will they are entitled 
to a portion of the same for Convention purposes. The matter has been 
in litigation for more than a year. The Superior Court rendered a 
decision in favor of the Trustees of the Baptist State Convention. An 
appeal was taken to the Supreme Court, from which a decision is ex- 
pected to be handed down soon. 

As required by the Constitution we found upon examination that 
the Treasurer is bonded for $25,000, the bookkeeper, Miss Esther Ivey, 
for $10,000, and the bookkeeper of the Debt Service Fund, Miss Margie 
Murchison, for $10,000. 

R. L. McMillan, Secretary, 
Trustees of the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina 

100. North Carolina Representative of the Home Mission 
Board Ira D. S. Knight brought the report for the Home 
Mission Board and prior to its adoption Brother Ellis Fuller, 
pastor of the First Baptist Church of Atlanta, brought the 
feature message of the evening on Home Missions. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

"The New South" is a phrase made famous by Henry Grady, 
who resided in Altanta, Ga., the city of the headquarters for our 
Home Mission Board. This Board is aware of the New South of 
today. It is in the process of becoming unshackled so that it can con- 
tinue to accept every challenging opportunity. Our Home Mission 
Board defines its tasks as : First, "the preaching of the gospel to 
those who have it not in the isolated and neglected sections outside the 
normal reach of the churches ; and, second, any and all of the missionary 
and evangelistic tasks in the homeland which either because of their 
size, their universality, or their difficulty require the impact of the 
whole denomination for their solution and can, therefore, best be 
handled by a southwide agency. In short, Home Missions is the denomi- 
nation as a whole taking the gospel in all its fulness to the people of 
the homeland, Cuba and Panama." 



Annual of Session 1935 61 

Geographically our 'Home Mission task is not changing but there 
are changing opportunities. The old frontiers of Home Missions have 
passed away. The geographical frontier is giving place to the social, 
racial and economic frontier. The wide expanse of the prairies of the 
West is being replaced by the industrial centers and rapidly growing 
cities. City missions, evangelization of the foreigners, work among our 
brothers in black, good will centers and rescue missions, missions to the 
Jews, missions to the deaf and dumb, missions to the Indians, missions 
in the mountain sections, mission work in Cuba and Panama, all these 
are cast into a new mold and are demanding a new appraisal and a new 
approach. 

The Home Mission Board is aware of this new day. Its missionary 
activity is guaranteed by an honorable agreement with our creditors. 
There are about 250 missionaries and workers in the sanatorium, schools 
and goodwill centers. There are 598 mission stations maintained, 5 
goodwill centers, 2 rescue missions, a seamen's institute ; 29 schools are 
operated by Home missionaries in Panama, Cuba, and the homeland. 
Property is furnished for 8 mountain schools free of charge to local 
boards of trustees. A tubercular sanatorium in El Paso, Texas, is being 
successfully operated. A building and loan department has loaned 
nearly one and one-quarter million dollars to churches. During the 
past year this Board has conducted its enlarging work without borrow- 
ing a penny for operating expenses and has also paid off a substantial 
amount of its indebtedness. Last year the Home Mission Board placed 
36 new missionaries in the field and opened 76 new missions. But best 
of all is the record of 3,740 conversions and baptisms during the past 
year. 

The glorious record of the past few years and the call of new 
opportunities and obligations should elicit new and larger financial sup- 
port from every member of our denomination. The population of the 
South has increased two and a half million during the past five years. 
Gains in all religious faiths have only increased one and one-third million 
during the same period of time. Today there are over 24 million un- 
churched people in the south. Today there are more foreigners than 
Negroes in our big southern cities. Our own Dr. E. P. Alldredge 
writes, "No other great denomination in America today is face to face 
with such wonderful opportunities for racial service and reconstruction 
as are vouchsafed to Southern Baptists ; and no other great denomina- 
tion is putting forth so small and so insignificant an effort to seize these 
vast opportunities as are Southern Baptists." 

Surely we will catch the vision of the new, industrial, enlarging 
South and arise in our strength to give new and greater support to our 
alert, efficient, aggressive and Christ-honoring Home Mission Board. 



62 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

101. A motion by A. J. Barton authorized the President 
and Secretary of the Convention to pass upon and confirm that 
portion of the Journal not approved by the Convention. 

102. In these closing moments President \\ all expressed 
again the feelings of deep appreciation to the many good people 
who have contributed to this great Convention and called to 
the platform the Host Pastor of the Convention. E. Gibson 
Davis, while the Convention stood in sincere gratitude. 

103. The motion for final adjournment was made by T. 
H. King and following prayer by Ira D. S. Knight. Durham, 
the One Hundredth Fifth Annual Convention of North Caro- 
lina Baptists adjourned. 

Zexo Wall. President, 

Charles B. Deaxe. Recording Secretary. 



Annual of Session 1935 



63 







#ur||ome 


#oerg 


S. W. BENNETT 


s. s. McGregor 


Lincolnton 


Gatesville 


JOHN D. BERRY 


D. J. JAMERSON 


Raleigh 


Pensacola 


E. C. DUNCAN 


W. G. MITCHELL 


Freeland 


Union Grove 


W. B. EDWARDS 


J. L. MARTIN 


Murfreesboro 


Raleigh 


R. M. FARTHING 


M. A. NORMAN 


Sugar Grove 


Sylva 


C. F. FIELDS 


H. W. NORRIS 


Benham 


Holly Springs 


J. L. HANCOCK 


C. D. PETERSON 


Marion 


Clinton 


Z. D. HARRILL 


J. W. RASH 


Ellenboro 


Statesville 


F. M. HUGGINS 


S. M. SEXTON 


Alexis 


Hot Springs 


ARCHIBALD JOHNSON 


W. F. STALEY 


Thomasville 


Winston-Salem 


C. L. JACKSON WELLINGTON SWIFT 


Pine Bluff 


Reece 



PROGRAM 

PRESENTED BY 

NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST PASTORS' 
CONFERENCE 

AT THE 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

Asheville, N. C. 

NOVEMBER 11, 12, 1935 
Subject: The Country Church 

MONDAY — Afternoon Session 

3 :00 — Devotions J. M. Duncan, Murf reesboro 

3:15 — Possibilities and Potentialities of the Country Church 

Charles Gillespie, Oxford 
3 :45 — The Type of Leadership Needed on the Rural Field 

M. L. Lewis, Dana 
4:15 — Evangelism Among Our Country Churches 

Charles Howard, Buies Creek 
4:45 — Round Table Discussion 
5 :15 — Adjournment 

MONDAY — Evening Session 

7 :30 — Devotions J. H. Henline, Newland 

7 :45 — Stewardship Among Our Rural Churches : 

1. The Spiritual Value of Stewardship to the Individual 
(20 min.), H. B. Anderson, Durham. 

2. The Tithe as an Expression of Stewardship (20 min.), 
H. W. Baucom, Waynesville. 

3. Regular, Systematic Offerings (20 min.), J. H. Barnes, 
Rose Hill. 

4. The Lord's Acre Plan — Address and Pictures, Dumont 
Clarke, Asheville. 

TUESDAY— Morning Session 

9 :30 — Devotions W. C. Camp, Cherryville 

9 :45 — Miscellaneous and Business 
10 :00 — A Mission Program Among Our Country Churches 

J. B. Little, Marshville 
10:30 — A Rural Field Program of Training. .. .Elliott Stewart, Fairfield 
1 1 :00 — Pastoral Support Among Rural Churches 

J. U. Teague, Henderson 
11 :30 — Truett's Tribute to the Country Pastor 

Charles H. Dickey, Williamston 
12 :00 — Adjournment 

L. Bunn Olive, President, Mars Hill 
James A. Ivey, Vice-President, West Asheville 
Wayne Williams, Secretary, Oteen 

[64] 



LIST OF MESSENGERS BY ASSOCIATIONS 

ALEXANDER (2)— Charles E. Echerd, Taylorsville; Charles C. Holland, Taylors- 
ville. 

ALLEGHANY (3)— Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Fender, Whitehead; G. A. Martin, 
Sparta. 

ANSON (1)— Daniel B. Grant, Cheraw, S. C. 

ASHE (5)— Fred Huddler, West Jefferson; Mrs. B. E. Reeves, West Jefferson; 
James Walter Whittington, West Jefferson; Rev. and Mrs. W. T. Whittington, 
West Jefferson. 

ATLANTIC (8)— J. P. Harris, Maysville; J. L. Hodges, Jr., New Bern; M. 
L. Mintz, Swansboro; W. B. Sprinkle, Marshallberg; A. P. Stephens, More- 
head City; O. B. Willis, Morehead City; R. T. Willis, Morehead City; R. 
T. Willis, Jr., Oriental. 

AVERY (2)— J. L. Martin, Fineola; J. M. Pritchard, Pieola. 

BLADEN (4) — Rev. and Mrs. W. O. Biggs, Elizabethtown ; Robert H. Britt, 
Clarkton; R. J. Hall, Bladenboro. 

BLUE RIDGE (8)— B. F. Bray, Jr., Marion; W. R. Grigg, Marion; T. E. 
Payne, Marion; Mr. and Mrs. Jesse G. Price, Marion; R. L. S'mith, Old 
Fort; Rev. and Mrs. Geo. V. Tilley, Morganton. 

BRUNSWICK (3)— Rev. and Mrs. T. H. Biles, Southport; Wiley Biles, South- 
port. 

BRUSHY MOUNTAIN (6)— Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Eller, North Wilkesboro; 
J. F. Jordan, Wilkesboro; Rev. and Mrs. Eugene Olive, North Wilkesboro; 
T. E. Story, Wilkesboro. 

BUNCOMBE (100) — Elva Alexander, Pauline Alexander, Jettie Anders, Mrs. H. 
C. Arrowood, Asheville; Mrs. C. L. Bailey, West Asheville; Rev. and Mrs. 
Smoot A. Baker, Enka; Mrs. J. P. Bennett, Asheville; Rev. and Mrs. John 
Bomar, Fairview; Elton Bowers, Ella Mae Buckner, N. Buckner, Mrs. W. 

E. Buckner, Asheville; Edith Beatrice Burrell, Biltmore; Rev. and Mrs. 
W. R. Burrell, Biltmore; Mrs. Delia Carson, Lillie J. Corn, Mrs. N. P. 
Corn, Asheville; G. C. Cox, Weaverville; R. E. Currence, E. Gibson Davis, 
Mrs. R. O. Dye, Geo. L. Farmer, Asheville; Paul Forsythe, Ridgecrest; B. 

F. Gehring, Biltmore; Rev. and Mrs. J. B. Grice, West Asheville; Rev. and 
Mrs. O. J. Hagler, Black Mountain; M. W. Hamrick, Asheville; J. H 
Harrill, Ridgecrest; J. M. Henderson, Swannanoa; B. S. Hensley, Barnards 
ville; Mrs. J. M. Henderson, Swannanoa; Mr. and Mrs. O. V. Hines, Ashe 
ville; Eula Hudson, Black Mountain; James A. ^Ivey, West Asheville; Mrs 
R. B. Jenkins, A. A. Johnson, T. L. Johnson, Asheville; Mrs. W. S. Johnson 
West Asheville; Ellis C. Jones, Asheville; Inez Jones, Oteen; Mr. and 
Mrs. W. E. Jones, Oteen; Mrs. W. B. Lyles, Mrs. Lillian M. Ledbetter, 
Black Mountain; Mrs. C. M. McCall, D. C. Martin, Asheville; Mrs. R. L. May, 
Ridgecrest; Marguerite Michael, Mrs. P. A. Miller, Mrs. Dwight Morgan, 
Mrs. Hilliard Morgan, Mrs. J. E. Morgan, Rev. and Mrs. J. R. Owen, 
Asheville; Otto Parham, West Asheville; Janey Parker, Mrs. O. Pearle, 
Burgin Pennell, Mr. and Mrs. George Pennell, J. C. Pipes, Asheville; Erskine 
Plemmons, Marshall; Alpha Prescott, J. D. Quinton, Curtis J. Rice, J. W. 
Roberts, Naomi S'chell, Asheville; Mrs. Charles Shumate, Black Mountain; 
Mrs. C. T. Shytle, R. H. Spiro, A. P. Sprinkle, Asheville; R. F. Staples, 
Ridgecrest; Rev. and Mrs. Nane Starnes, Mrs. G. F. Stradley, Asheville; 

r 65 1 



66 X. C. Baptist State Convention 

Rev. and Mrs. L. W. Teague. Barnardsville: Mrs. W. D. Tracey, C. K. 
Turner. Asheville; Margaret Upshaw, Black Mountain; W. S'. Vehaun, Clarence 
X. Walker. Mrs. L. D. Warren, Mrs. M. R. Warren. Lucile Welch, Patty 
Weller. E. E. Wheeler, Mary Jane Whittington, Mrs. B. H. Williams, James 
M. Williams, Mrs. R. J. Williams, Asheville; Wyman E. Wood, Swanna- 
noa; Don C. Young, Asheville; Charlotte Young, Asheville. 

BURNT SWAMP (3)— Jasper Chavis, Lumberton; C. E. Locklear, Pembroke; 
W. G. Revels, Pembroke. 

CABARRUS (10)— C. E. Baucom. Concord; J. W. Connell, Concord; Mrs. A. S. 
Johnson, Concord; C. R. Johnson, Concord; M. L. Ross, Concord; J. A. Sey- 
mour, Concord; Rev. and Mrs. E. S. Summers, Concord; J. S. Tyson, 
Kannapolis; P. A. Underwood. Kannapolis. 

CALDWELL (25)— W. R. Beach, Lenoir; H. &. Benfield, Lenoir; Rev. and Mrs. 
J. G. Benfield, Morganton; R. D. Carroll, Hudson; Mr. and Mrs. E. B. 
Crisp. Lenoir; Rev. and Mrs. R. E. Hardaway, Lenoir; Arvil Woodrow Icard, 
Granite Falls: Mrs. W. F. Kerby. Granite Falls; Mrs. John B. Lane, Lenoir; 
W. W. Lynes, Lenoir; Mr. and Mrs. S. Q. Myers, Lenoir; Mr. and Mrs. 
R. L. Palerm, Lenoir; Mr. and Mrs. W. T. SherrilL Granite Falls; Edith 
Steele. Lenoir; Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Steele, Lenoir; Ruby Steele, Lenoir; Rev. 
and Mrs. G. C. Teague, Granite Falls. 

CAPE FEAR COLUMBUS (6)— C. R. Hinton, Tabor City; S. N. Lamb, White- 
ville; I. T. Newton, Whiteville; C. M. Pegram, Fair Bluff; W. J. Russell, 
Whiteville; G. M. Singletary. Whiteville. 

CAROLINA (15)— Mrs. B. F. Baldwin, Hendersonville; Claribel Jeffers, Hen- 
dersonville; B. E. Jones. Hendersonville; A. I. Justice, Hendersonville; J. 
Foy Justice, Hendersonville; Rev. and Mrs. J. M. Justice, Hendersonville; 
Rev. and Mrs. L. J. Keels, Tryon; Rev. and Mrs. M. L. Lewis, Dana; Ola 
McFee, Tryon; A. B. Murphree, Hendersonville; Mrs. M. L. Pace, Hender- 
sonville; J. E. Shipman. Hendersonville. 

CATAWBA RIVER (8)— Russell Berry. Morganton; Rev. and Mrs. R. L. Coun- 
cilman. Morganton; Rev. and Mrs. W. P. Crouch, Morganton; E. McK. 
Goodwin, Morganton; J. R. Greene, Drexel; M. I. Harris, Yaldese. 

CENTRAL (24)— H. O. Baker. Wake Forest; Charles E. Brewer, Raleigh; W. 
R. Cullom, Wake Forest; E. B. Earnshaw, Wake Forest; J. Aline Easley, 
Wake Forest; Rev. and Mrs. L. R. Evans, Knightsdale; J. S. Farmer, 
Raleigh; F. B. Hamrick, Raleigh; Mrs. Edna R. Harris, Raleigh; J. Henry 
ilighsmith, Raleigh; Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Huggins, Raleigh; Mr. and Mrs. 
T. S'. Johnson, Raleigh; Mrs. W. N. Jones, Raleigh; B. E. Kenton, Youngs- 
ville; Thurman D. Kitchin, Wake Forest; Perry Morgan, Raleigh; C. L. 
Ousley, Zebulon; Rev. and Mrs. J. M. Page, Raleigh; Mabel Starnes, Raleigh; 
Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh. 

CHEROKEE (1)— W. H. Fitzgerald, Cherokee. 

CHOWAN (/)— B. B. Flora, Shawboro; John R. Link, Belcross; B. A. Mitchell, 
Corapeake; Rev. and Mrs. E. H. Potts, Elizabeth City; Eldred Rountree, 
Corapeake; W. F. Woodall, Gatesville. 

EASTERN (6)— J. Herman Barnes. Rose Hill; H. G. Bryant, Clinton; R. C. 
Foster, Warsaw; Mack Herring, Mt. Olive; Elbert N. Johnson, Mt. Olive; 
T. H. King, Clinton. 

FLAT RIVER (6)— Dr. and Mrs. Roy R. McCulloch. Oxford; W. D. Poe, 
Oxford; L. J. Rainey, Durham; G. Van Stephens, Oxford; J. U. Teague, 
Henderson. 

FRENCH BROAD (21)— L. J. Amnions, Mars Hill; Hoyt Blackwell, Mars 
Hill; J. L. Bragg, Marshall; Mattie Briggs, Mars Hill; Paul Briggs, Mars 



Annual of Session 1935 67 

Hill; I. N. Carr, Mars Hill; Mrs. L. D. Edwards, Mars Hill; Fred P. Jervis, 
Mars Hill; Dr. and Mrs. Walt N. Johnson, Mars Hill; Mrs. Spencer King, 
Mars Hill; Spencer King, Jr., Mars Hill; Dr. and Mrs. R. L. Moore, Mars 
Hill; Mrs. R. R. Riddle, Mars Hill; Mrs. O. E. Roberts. Mars Hill; Rev. 
and Mrs. Oscar E. Sams, Mars Hill; E. F. Sprinkle, Alexander; Mrs. M. O. 
Summerlin, Mars Hill; Wade White, Mars Hill. 

GASTON (23)— B. F. Austin, Gastonia; N. E. Batchelor, Mt. Holly; M. L. 
Barnes, Mt. Holly; David E. Bobbitt, Cherryville; W. G. Camp. Cherry- 
ville; T. L. Cashwell, Gastonia; G. W. Davis, Gastonia; Rev. and Mrs. P. A. 
Hicks, Belmont; Paul Hicks, Belmont; W. Arthur Hoffman, West Gastonia; 
E. V. Hudson, Cramerton; J. A. Hudson. Gastonia; Hubert T. Huggins, 
Dallas; T. C. Lanier, Belmont; Maude Lee Reep, Belmont; Rev. and Mrs. 
S'. M. Stroupe, Alexis; W. L. Walters, Gastonia; David C. Wesson, Mc- 
Adenville; J. W. Whitley. Gastonia; D. M. Witherspoon, Cherryville; J. Clyde 
Yates, Bessemer City. 

GREEN RIVER (5)— Edward Jenkins, Rutherfordton; J. W. O'Harra. Candler; 
G. G. O'Neill, Rutherfordton; W. E. Sweatt, Union Mills; Charles B. Trammel, 
Columbus. 

HAYWOOD (13) — Mrs. R. N. Barber, Waynesville; H. W. Baucom, Waynes- 
ville; Mrs. W. T. Crawford, Waynesville; Edwin Haynes, Waynesville; Mrs. 
Claude A. Haynes, Waynesville; Rev. and Mrs. A. V. Joyner, Canton; F. H. 
Leatherwood, Waynesville; R. G. Mace, Clyde; Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Morgan, 
Waynesville; Ralph Queen, Canton; J. M. Woodard, Hazelwood. 

JOHNSTON (7)— J. E. Carter, Selma; A. R. Creech, Micro; Mrs. B. B. Creech. 
Four Oaks; L. R. O'Brian, Selma; W. O. Rosser, Smithfield; Mrs. T. W. 
Sanders, Four Oaks; Clarence W. Teague, Wake Forest. 

KINGS MOUNTAIN (41)— C. S. Bridges, Shelby; Mrs. William Carroll, Kings 
Mountain; Rev. and Mrs. W. A. Elam, Shelby; Rev. and Mrs. R. P. Hamby, 
S'helby; C. Rush Hamrick, Shelby; G. C. Hamrick, S'helby; G. V. Hawkins, 
Shelby; Woodrow W. Hill, Boiling Springs; Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Hord, Kings 
Mountain; Nolan Howington, Boiling Springs; J. L. Jenkins, Boiling Springs; 
L. F. King, Shelby; Mr. and Mrs. S. A. McMurry, Shelby; Lewis McS'wain, 
Shelby; Clarence V. Martin, S'helby; J. H. Mauney, Shelby; P. M. Mauney, 
Shelby; John P. Mull, Shelby; O. M. Mull, Shelby; Rush Padgett, Grover; 
Rev. and Mrs. B. P. Parks, Shelby; J. S. Putnam, Shelby; Lawrence Roberts, 
Shelby; A. G. Sargeant, Kings Mountain; Harold C. Seefeldt, Shelby; Charles 
W. Spake, Shelby; Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Spangler, Shelby; Rev. and Mrs. J. W. 
Suttle, S'helby; D. A. Tedder, Shelby; Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Waldrop, Shelby; 
Wilbur H. Wall, Shelby; Zeno Wall, Shelby; D. G. Washburn, Shelby. 

LIBERTY (21)— J. N. Bowman. Erlanger; R. D. Covington, Thomasville; Louis 
S. Gaines, Lexington; I. G. Greer, Thomasville; Sallie L. McCracken, 
Thomasville; Rev. and Mrs. W. K. McGee, Thomasville; John Arch Mc- 
Millan, Thomasville; G. W. Miller, Lexington; Mary Misenheimer. Lexing- 
ton; Mrs. E. E. Morgan, Lexington; E. F. Mumford, High Point; J. A. 
Neilson, Thomasville; H. T. Penry, Southmont; Rev. and Mrs. E. C. Roach, 
Lexington; Pauline Roach, Lexington; Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Sharpe, Lexington; 
C. M. Wall, Lexington; W'alter L. Warfford, Lexington. 

LITTLE RIVER (S)— Mrs. C. D. Bain, Dunn; Leslie H. Campbell. Buie's Creek; 
E. Norfleet Gardner, Dunn; Charles B. Howard, Buie's Creek, J. K. Stewart, 
Buie's Creek. 

MECKLENBURG (24)— Mrs. R. H. Beatty, Derita; R. H. Black. North Char- 
lotte; Geo. W. Burch, Paw Creek; Zeb Caudle, Charlotte; Mrs. R. M. Dowd, 
Charlotte; M. H. Drye, Charlotte; C. W. Durden, Charlotte; Rev. and Mrs. 
W. L. Griggs, Charlotte; Mrs. S'. B. Hagler, Charlotte; George L. Hocutt, 



68 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Matthews; Tom F. Jamison, Charlotte; W. Walter Jones, Charlotte; Mrs. 

F. D. Lethco, Charlotte; Luther Little, Charlotte; Raymond Long, Charlotte; 
J. D. Moose, Charlotte; E. T. Parham, Charlotte; W. W. Rimmer, Cornelius; 
Edward E. Rutledge, Charlotte; Rev. and Mrs. L. U. Weston, Huntersville; 
Dr. and Mrs. Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte 

MITCHELL (3) — Rev. and Mrs. J. C. Owen, Spruce Pine; L. R. Vann, Spruce 
Pine. 

MT. ZION (31)— H. B. Anderson. Durham; Rev. and Mrs. C. E. Baker, Dur- 
ham; O. T. Binkley, Chapel Hill; Mrs. A. C. Brantley, Durham; C. E. 
Byrd, Durham; Mrs. W. E. Byrd, C. A. Caldwell, Hillsboro; Trela D. Collins, 
Durham; Mrs. John T. Craig, Durham; Kate Durham, Durham; H. L. Fergu- 
son, Durham; W. G. Hall, Durham; Rev. and Mrs. P. P. Hartsell, Durham; 
Rev. and Mrs. Charles Jollay, Durham; Dr. and Mrs. Ira D. S. Knight, 
Durham; James P. Morgan, Durham; C. S. Norville, Durham; Mrs. B. E. 
Pearson, Durham; Mrs. H. W. Pickett, Durham; C. R. Pittard, Apex; Mr. and 
Mrs. H. J. Rhodes, Burlington; Sallie Rigsbee, Durham; W. L. Shoffner, 
Burlington; Z. B. Teel, Durham; Charles M. Walker, Hillsboro; J. T. 
Witten, Durham. 

NEUSE (5)— B. G. Early, Kinston; J. C. Hough, Kinston; T. C. Johnson, Kin- 
ston; A. J. Smith, Goldsboro; B. W. S'pilman, Kinston. 

NEW FOUND (1)— W. G. Woody, Luck. 

NEW SOUTH RIVER (2)— G. N. Ashley, Salemburg; D. M. Clemmons, Fayette- 
ville. 

PAMLICO (1)— Elliott R. Stewart, Fairfield. 

PEE DEE (8)— Bruce Benton, Rockingham; C. B. Deane, Rockingham; T. W. 
Hearne, Rockingham; J. I. McGill, Wadesboro; O. W. McManus, Gibson; 
Mrs. F. I. Mason, Rockingham; \V. H. Moore, Wadesboro; J. B. Willis, 
Hamlet. 

PIEDMONT (26)— Mrs. E. R. Baldwin, Greensboro; J. T. J. Battle, Greens- 
boro; T. W. Bray, Greensboro; N. F. Britt, High Point; A. B. Conrad, High 
Point; A. Wayland Cooke, Greensboro; Rev. and Mrs. J. Ben Eller, Greens- 
boro; A. Lincoln Fulk, High Point; John N. Garner, Greensboro; Mrs. R. 

G. Gladstone, Reidsville; J. M. Hillard, High Point; Mrs. R. L. Holmes, 
Reidsville; G. H. Jones, High Point; John McCullen, Reidsville; Rev. and 
Mrs. Hughey O. Miller, High Point; Cleo Mitchell, Greensboro; C. N. Royal, 
High Point; T. L. Sasser, Reidsville; J. H. Saunders, Reidsville; Elwood 
Talley, Reidsville; Dr. and Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro; B. G. Whitley, 
Greensboro; Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro. 

PILOT MOUNTAIN (33)— Rev. and Mrs. R. E. Adams, Mayodan; E. F. Baker, 
Kernersville; J. F. Carter, Winston-Salem; Fred N. Day, Winston-Salem; 
Robert A. Gardner, Madison; Smith Hagaman, Winston-Salem; V. H. Harrell, 
Winston-Salem; Rev. and Mrs. D. H. Ives, Leaksville; E. L. James, Winston- 
Salem; T. C. Keaton, Winston-Salem; Raymond Clyde Lanier, Mt. Airy; 
E. A. Long, Germanton; Mrs. G. T. Lumpkin, Winston-Salem; J. F. Manuel, 
Germanton; B. K. Mason, Winston-Salem; Mrs. J. F. Meadows, King; S. F. 
Morton, Winston-Salem; W. T. Myers, Winston-Salem; Mrs. L. S. Neal, 
Leaksville; Charles E. Parker, Winston-Salem; Mrs. O. L. Rains, King; J. 
Houghton Rich, Winston-Salem; Mrs. J. J. Roddick, Winston-Salem; J. Ned 
Taylor, Winston-Salem; N. C. Teague, Winston-Salem; Rev. and Mrs. S. 
H. Templeman, Winston-Salem; O. E. Ward, Winston-Salem; J. C. Watkins, 
Winston-Salem ; Rev. and Mrs. David H. Wilcox, Winston-Salem. 

RALEIGH (26)— M. O. Alexander, Cary; E. B. Booker, Apex; J. M. Broughton, 
Raleigh; Roger F. Collins, Jr., Holly Springs; G. N. Cowan, Apex; Mary 
Currin, Raleigh; Rev. and Mrs. Charles H. Dickey, Raleigh; Forrest C. 



Annual of Session 1935 69 

Feezor. Raleigh; L. E. M. Freeman, Raleigh; Mrs. H. P. Hoyle, Raleigh; 
Mrs. J. F. Keith, Knightsdale; Mrs. W. D. Kelly Raleigh; J. E. Massey, 
Holly Springs; G. T. Mills, Apex; Mrs. A. M. Moore, Raleigh; L. L. Morgan, 
Gary; C. H. Norris, Wake Forest; S'. W. Oldham, Wendell; Sallie Parham, 
Raleigh; Daphne Fenny, Raleigh; Edwin McNeill Poteat, Jr., Raleigh; Vera 
Ruth, Raleigh; O. G. Tillman, Cary; C. A. Upchurch, Raleigh. 

RANDOLPH (8) — Dempsey Barnes, Asheboro; Rev. and Mrs. O. P. Dix, Randle- 
man; R. E. Heath, Steeds; Wiley A. Jones, Asheboro; John C. Kidd, Ben- 
nett; D. C. Smith, Asheboro; H. M. Stroup, Ramseur. 

ROANOKE (22)— William B. Batts, Rocky Mount; Ford A. Burns, Stantons- 
burg; Mr. and Mrs. John T. Coley, Rocky Mount; Dr. and Mrs. Hugh A. 
Ellis, Wilson; L. R. Ennis, Farmville; J. R. Everett, Washington; Rev. and 
Mrs. A. W. Fleischmann, Greenville; W. B. Guthrie, Chocowinity; J. E. Kirk, 
Roanoke Rapids; C. G. Lowe, Rocky Mount; J. A. Mclver, Greenville; J. 
L. Peacock, Tarboro; Mrs. T. F. Pettus, Wilson; Mrs. L. L. Quick, Wilson; 
E. C. Shoe, Robersonville; J. H. Smith, Williamston; Mrs. J. B. Spilman, 
Greenville; Rev. and Mrs. R. E. Tripp, Nashville. 

ROBESON (6)— Clifton J. Allen, Fairmont; W. T. Baucom, St. Pauls; Dr. and 
Mrs. C. H. Durham, Lumberton; Sam F. Hudson, Red Springs; A. B. 
Wood, Maxton. 

ROWAN (17)— Earl L. Bradley, Spencer; R. O. Brinkley, China Grove; Dr. and 
Mrs. Glenn Choate, Salisbury; Arch C. Cree, Salisbury; J. S. Davis, Salisbury; 
Rev. and Mrs. E. F. Eagle, Salisbury; Charles Lee Fisher, Salisbury; Mrs. 
T. J. Coggin, Salisbury; Rev. and Mrs. M. W. Gordon, Spencer; R. N. 
Huneycutt, Salisbury; Wade H. James, Kannapolis; D. H. Lowder, Salis- 
bury; C. A. Rhyne, Salisbury; Louise Smith, Granite Quarry. 

SANDY CREEK (11)— Rev. and Mrs. E. W. Byerly, Bonlee; V. M. Dorsett, 
Siler City; Mrs. Gray Emerson, Bear Creek; Mrs. D. F. Perrell, Bear Creek; 
A. H. Porter, Bonlee; Rev. and Mrs. J. Louis Price, Siler City; Ronald E. 
Wall, Sanford; Rev. and Mrs. R. H. Weaver, Bonlee. 

SANDY RUN (21)— W. A. Ayers, Forest City; Harry F. Bean, Rutherfordton; 
Rev. and Mrs. J. A. Brock, Forest City; Wm. H. Covert, Forest City; M. 
L. Hamrick, S'pindale; T. M. Hester, Spindale; G. P. Home, Rutherfordton; 
Rev. and Mrs. J. A. Hunnicutt, Cliff side; James W. Jones, Caroleen; A. C. 
Lovelace, Boiling Springs; A. C. Lovelace, Jr., Boiling Springs; Charles A. 
Maddry, Spindale; Rev. and Mrs. Charles T. Plybon, Forest City; J. Rector 
Robbins, Harris; Charles L. Taylor, Ellenboro; S. E. Welchel, Avondale; E. 
P. White, Rutherfordton; W. K. Wyatt, Bostic. 

SOUTH FORK (22)— W. P. Biggerstaff, Lincolnton; W. R. Bradshaw, Hickory; 
Mrs. Geo. P. Brevard, Lincolnton; J. R. Cantrell, Newton; Rev. and Mrs. 
Waldo D. Early, Hickory; Rev. and Mrs. Elbert F. Hardin, Lincolnton; Mr. 
and Mrs. L. L. Hatfield, Hickory; Rev. and Mrs. Jack Roy Keller, Hickory; 
W. C. Laney, Brookford; W. W. Marr, Hickory; Rev. and Mrs. Richard 
K. Redwine, Hickory; Mrs. J. O. Shuford, Lincolnton; Mrs. J. A. Steel- 
man, Hickory; S. A. Stroup, Catawba; E. F. S'ullivan, Hickory; L. R. 
Williams, Maiden; Fred G. Womack, Hickory. 

SOUTH YADKIN (11)— W. H. Dodd, Mocksville; Rev. and Mrs. J. H. Ful- 
ghum, Mocksville; Frank Carter Hawkins, S'tatesville; L. G. Horn, Mocks- 
ville; H. Fletcher Lambert, Statesville; L. K. Lazenby, S'tatesville; W. L. 
McSwain, Harmony; Dr. and Mrs. Lester Martin, Mocksville; B. E. Morris, 
Statesville. 

STANLY (8)— Rev. and Mrs. F. A. Bower, Albemarle; W. S. Caudle, Albe- 
marle; M. L. Dorton, Albemarle; T. W. Fogleman, Albemarle; W. A. Hough, 
Norwood; Mrs. E. C. Kirk, Sylva; Rev. L. D. Munn, Badin. 



70 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

SURRY (3) — Tames H. Hatty, Mt. Airy; Walter L. Johnson, Mt. Airy; A. V. 

West, Mt. Airy. 
TAR RIVER (10)— Mrs. J. T. Alderman, Henderson; R. E. Brickhouse, War- 

renton; C. E. Crawford, Bunn; John Edwards, Henderson; J. H. Harper, 

Louisburg; A. A. Pippin, Zebulon; Rev. and Mrs. Joe F. Roach, Norlina; 

Linville Roach. Norlina; F. G. Walker, Castalia. 
TENNESSEE RIVER (3)— Nathan C. Brooks. Jr., Bryson City; V. A. Browning, 

Bryson City; J. H. Harwood, Bryson City. 
THREE FORKS' (9)— Mrs. J. D. Brown, Blowing Rock; Mr. and Mrs. Wade E. 

Brown, Blowing Rock; J. C. Canipe, Boone; Mrs. J. J. Coffey, Boone; Phelps 

D. Fletcher, Zionville; Rev. and Mrs. Tipton Greene, Boone; J. A. Mc- 
Kaughan, Winston-Salem. 

TRANSYLVANIA (3)— W. H. Duckworth, Brevard; Rev. and Mrs. Paul Hart- 
sell, Brevard. 

TUCKASEIGEE (10)— Mrs. C. L. Allison, Sylva; W. N. Cook, Webster; Thad 
F. Deitz. Sylva; P. L. Elliott, Cullowhee; J. V. Hall. Sylva; Mrs. John R. 
Jones, Sylva; R. F. Mayberry, Sylva; Mrs. J. Gray Murray, Sylva; Rev. 
T. D. Sitton, Cullowhee; I. K. Stafford, Cullowhee. 

UNION (8) — N. C. Coggin, Wingate; H. F. Goodwin, Monroe; N. S. Joyner, 
Waxhaw; Rev. and Mrs. James B. Little. Marshville; J. W. Neal, Monroe; 
J. A. Snow, Wingate; John T. Wayland, Monroe. 

WEST CHOWAN (16)— S. B. Adams, Merry Hill; H. F. Brinson, Lewiston; 
John H. Bunn. Murfreesboro; W. J. Carter, Merry Hill; Oscar Creech, 
Ahoskie; L. M. Dixon, Colerain; M. F. Hawkins, Windsor; R. R. Jackson, 
Harrellsville; Ernest C. Kolb, Windsor; W. A. McGlohon, Murfreesboro; 
Mrs. Gordon Maddrey, Woodland; D. J. Robinson, Winton; W. V. Tarlton, 
Rich Square; E. W. Taylor. Merry Hill; C. Herman Trueblood, Seaboard; 
J. 0. Walton, Windsor. 

WEST LIBERTY (D— J. N. Lee, Murphy. 

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA (8)— H. W. Baucom, Jr., Murphy; Howard 
Hall, Canton; Rev. and Mrs. C. F. Rogers, Andrews; R. C. S'hearin, Murphy; 
Barbara S'pafford. Andrews; J. M. Stoner, Murphy; J. L. Underwood, 
Hayesville. 

WILMINGTON (4) — Arthur J. Barton. Wilmington; J. Marcus Kester, Wil- 
mington; John E. Lanier, Wallace; R. H. Satterfield, Wilmington. 

YADKIX (1)— J. P. Davis, Boonville. 

YAN'CEY (2) — Rev. and Mrs. Jesse Blalock. Micaville. 

VISITORS (40) — Ruby Lee Alexander, Asheville; Ben S. Beach. Clayton, Ga. ; 
Violet Cook, Beckley, W. Va.; Win. J. Grain, Clarksville, Va.; Mrs. I. M. 
Curtis, Hay, Washington; Pauline Davis, Asheville; Mrs. Eula H. Dawson, 
Morristown. Tenn. ; A. K. Dickey, Murphy; Mrs. W. C. Elkins, Asheville; 
Blanche Embler, Asheville; D. L. Faircloth, Lakeland, Fla. ; Mrs. D. L. 
Faircloth, Lakeland, Fla.; Edith Freeman, Asheville; Mrs. L. T. Freeman, 
Asheville; George Franklin, Asheville; William Godsey, Asheville; Mrs. L. 

E. Gilliam, Asheville; Mrs. J. P. Goodman, Elk Mountain; Miss Alda Gray- 
son, Rutherfordton; B. Frank Hasty, Greenville, S. C. ; Mrs. Paul W. Hay- 
dock, Asheville; L. A. Hurst. Etowah, Tenn.; Mrs. Ray Ingle, Asheville; 
Blanche. Jumper, Asheville; W. S. Johnson, West Asheville; Mrs. Forrest T. 
Jones, Asheville; Mrs. Hugh Latimef, Asheville; Mrs. J. Albert Leath, Ashe- 
ville; D. D. Lewis, Westminister, S. C. ; H. H. McMillan, Soochow, China; 
Charles E. Maddry, Richmond, Va. ; Mrs. D. C. Martin, Asheville; Mrs. 
E. L. Middleton. Durham; Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Miller, Asheville; Carolyn 
Morgan, Asheville.; Elizabeth Morgan, Asheville; Mrs. W. R. Murray, Ashe- 
ville; Elizabeth Nix, Asheville; H. L. Phillips. Asheville. 



REPORT OF 
THE GENERAL BOARD 

Compiled by 

M. A. Huggixs, General Secretary 

Raleigh, N. C. 



71] 



104. 

REPORT OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

This is the fourth report of the Board prepared by the present Gen- 
eral Secretary. In each of the previous reports a note of optimism was 
sounded. Results have proved that our optimism was- well founded. We 
record our gratitude to God for His favors showered upon us, and for 
the enlarged and enlarging vision of our people. In 1934 we made a 
substantial advance over 1933, in fact an advance of about thirteen per 
cent; and in 1935 that advance continues, and at about the same rate. 
We confidently look for an even greater advance in 1936. Our ex- 
pectation is due both to our optimism and to encouraging reports which 
come to us from all parts of the state. We thank God and take courage. 

In 1933 the Convention adopted twenty-two objectives. We can 
measure, at least in part, our progress in terms of these objectives. 
This procedure will enable us to get a fairly accurate glimpse of many 
phases of our work, as well as the progress which we are making. 

105. A. OUR OBJECTIVES 

In parenthesis we give the figures for last year and for the year 
preceding, in so far as this is possible. The figures in the first paren- 
thesis are for the year immediately preceding ; and in the second paren- 
thesis the figures for the next preceding year, etc., are given. 

1. Every church with a pastor. 

It is estimated that on October 1, 1935 160 (175) (200), churches 
were without pastors. Probably there are at all times at least 150 
pastorless churches. 

2. A revival in each church — at least one each year. 

Accurate figures are not available, but the Minutes of 1934 show 
that 1,797 (1,792), churches reported baptisms while 613 (593) did 
not. Taking the state as a whole, 19,670 baptisms were reported in 
1934, 20,038 in 1933, and 23,342 in 1932. 

3. Every church with a Sunday school enrollment at least as large as 
the church membership. 

For the year 1934 863 (810) (912) of the 2,384 Sunday schools in 
the state met the requirement. 

4. Every church with a B. T. U. 

As o-f October 1, 1935 1,050 (1,043), (975) of the 2.410 churches 
had a B. T. U. organization. 

5. Every church with a W. M. S. 

As of October 1, 1935 1,484 (1,100), (1,118) of the 2,410 churches 
had a W. M. S. 

172] 



Annual of Session 1935 73 

6. At least 500,000 members by 1940, with all church rolls corrected. 

The Minutes of 1934 show a membership of 450,770 (440,602) 
(433,046). The net gain in membership is about one half of the 
total baptisms. It is known that many churches, more than formerly 
perhaps, are correcting their rolls. 

7. Every Association with a representative Promotion-Executive Com- 
mittee, or its equivalent, that functions throughout the year, led by 
the Moderator or the Chairman of the Promotion-Executive Com- 
mittee, who will visit and encourage the churches. 

Probably about 40 (33) of the 70 associations are meeting the re- 
quirement in whole or in part. Only a few moderators, however, 
visit the churches. 

8. A ten days school, or schools, for Christian workers held each year 
with an attendance of at least 1,000. 

In the three pastors' schools provided at Meredith, Chowan and 
Mars Hill about 225 (192) pastors were enrolled. 

9. At least 2,500 college students enrolled in our Baptist colleges. 

For the school year ending June 1935, there were enrolled 2,415 
(2,229) college students. This does not include 691 (651) which 
were enrolled in the Wake Forest-Meredith summer school at Wake 
Forest and Mars Hill. 

10. Two general state missionaries giving their full time to the develop- 
ment of our churches, missionary instruction, forming fields, et 
cetera, especially in the rural churches. 

Beginning with January 1, 1935, the Board employed one Gen- 
eral Missionary, M. O. Alexander. 

11. A club of Charity and Children in every Baptist Sunday school. 

For the calendar year 1934, 772 (678), (781) Sunday schools had 
a club of Charity and Children. 

12. Twenty-five thousand subscribers to the Biblical Recorder, including 
every pastor, every Sunday school superintendent, every W. M. S. 
president or leader, and every B. T. U. leader or director. 

As of the first week of November 1935, the circulation of the 
Biblical Recorder was 10,500 (10,400), (8.000). Of the 1,175 or- 
dained ministers who were pastors, 605 (727), (582), were taking 
the Recorder; 97, (97), (78), of the 550 ordained ministers not in 
the pastorate were taking it; 410 (396), (317) of the 2,384 Sunday 
school superintendents, and 395 (377), (302) of the 1,100 W. M. S. 
presidents were taking it. 

13. Every institution and agency of the Convention living within its 
income. 

This objective has been reached. If the educational institutions 
collect only one half of the amounts due them by students, they will 
have no deficit for the year ending June 30, 1935. An exception to 
this statement is Campbell which will show a loss of $4,152. 



74 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

14. No borrowing by the Convention, or its institutions or agencies, of 
any funds for any purpose, except in anticipation of current income. 

Xo funds for current support have been borrowed this year. 

15. A fifty-fifty division of distributable or undesignated funds as be- 
tween State and Southwide objects. 

For 1935 the Cooperative Program (Undesignated), receipts are 
divided on the 60-40 basis. 60 for State and 40 for Southwide 
objects. 

16. An annual income, designated and undesignated of $450,000 for the 
fiscal year 1934; $500,000 for 1935; $550,000 for 1936; $600,000 
for 1937, $660,000 for 1938; $725,000 for 1939 and $800,000 for 
1940. 

Our total income for 1934, designated and undesignated, was $441,- 
325.87. Thus we fell short of our goal by only about $9,000. With 
real effort we can reach our goal of $500,000 for 1935. 

17. Every church contributing through the Cooperative Program, in- 
cluding both designated and undesignated funds. 

For 1934 1.796. (1,648), (1,607) of the 2,410 churches reported 
funds given through the Cooperative Program, or to some object in 
the Cooperative Program, leaving 614, (737), (767) that made no 
contribution. 

18. Every church and Sunday school contributing to the Orphanage. 

For 1934 1.920 (1,728), (1,686) churches made some contribution 
to the Orphanage, leaving 490, (657), (688), that did not. 

19. Every Sunday school contributing and remitting to the Orphanage 
once each month. 

During 1934 269, (230). Sunday schools met this requirement, 
leaving 2.115, (2,155) that did not. 

20. Every church making a Thanksgiving offering for the Orphanage. 

Including all offerings received in December 1934, it appears that 
1,659, (1,515), (1,056) churches made an offering on or about Thanks- 
giving, leaving 751, (870), (1,348) that did not. 

21. Every church and Sunday school making an offering on Mother's 
Day for the Hospital. 

On Mother's Day 1935 about 1,706 (1,308), (1,062) churches and 
Sunday schools made an offering to the Hospital. 

22. Every church making a remittance to the Convention Treasurer at 
least once each month. 

For the year 1934 359, (215), (197) churches met this require- 
ment, a gain of 144 over 1933. 

105. B. REPORT OF GENERAL BOARD MEETINGS 

The Board has had three meetings during the year, one on December 
17, 1934, one on April 2, 1935, and one on June 13, 1935. In accord with 
the Constitution of the Convention the important actions of the Board 
during the year are here recorded. 



Annual of Session 1935 75 

1. The principal item which claimed the attention of the Board in 
its December meeting was adoption of the budget for 1935. We do not 
publish here the budget figures for the reason that actual expenditures 
for each department of the work will be published in the Convention 
Annual. Suffice it to say the budget was carefully and conservatively 
made and we are living within our income. 

2. The last Convention ordered that all undesignated funds be divided 
sixty per cent for State objects and forty per cent for Southwide ob- 
jects. The Board divided the sixty per cent for State objects as follows: 
Christian Education, Debt Service 42% ; State Missions 13% ; Hospital 
4%; Ministerial Education 1%. 

3. Upon recommendation of a special committee surety bond for the 
Treasurer was fixed at $25,000; bonds for the bookkeeper, Miss Esther 
Ivey, and that of Miss Margie Murchison as bookkeeper of the Debt 
Service Fund, were fixed at $10,000 each. 

4. At the call meeting held in Greensboro on April 2 a committee 
was appointed to meet with representatives of other denominations in 
order to explore the possibility and consider the wisdom of some sort 
of closer cooperation with several of the religious groups in the state. 
The committee was composed of W. R. Cullom, L. R. Varser, W. H. 
Williams, Oscar Creech, T. D. Collins, J. Clyde Turner, Mrs. E. I. 
Olive, E. M. Poteat, Jr., Zeno Wall, M. A. Huggins, I. G. Greer, and 
L. E. M. Freeman. 

5. At this same meeting, by vote of fourteen to eight, the following 
resolution was adopted, and sent to the Executive Committee of the 
Southern Baptist Convention : 

Whereas information has been presented to us showing that many of 
the states of the Southern Baptist Convention are compelled to inaugurate 
some debt paying plan within the next one to four years for meeting 
obligations incurred by them, and. 

Whereas we believe that the interest of all our work, State and 
Southwide, will be better served through a cooperative effort which pro- 
vides for a sharing in the promotion and receipts of the Hundred Thou- 
sand Club, thus promoting unity and strength, and, 

Whereas, our own state debts in North Carolina are relatively larger 
than the debts on the Southwide Boards and institutions, and North 
Carolina has been compelled to undertake definite commitments for the 
retirement of its indebtedness, thus making it difficult and probably un- 
fair to our creditors to enter into a campaign for cash in which our state 
objects do not share. 

Therefore Be It Resolved: 

1. That we request your committee to adopt a recommendation to 
the Southern Baptist Convention that the Hundred Thousand Club Move- 
ment be projected on a cooperative basis as between the Southern Baptist 
Convention and the several State Conventions. 

2. That we approve the fifty-fifty basis of division as an ideal, but 
inasmuch as conditions vary in the states, that the Convention instruct 
its Executive Committee to work out a plan with each state that will 
be fair to both Southwide objects and State objects. 



76 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

6. At the June meeting of the Board the following recommendations 
of the General Secretary were adopted: 

1. That we ask Brother Perry Morgan to give his full time to Pro- 
motion beginning September 1 and running through about the middle of 
December. 

2. That we ask J. C. Pipes of Asheville to help us for three or four 
months in the associations west of the Blue Ridge. 

3. That we invite C. H. Dickey to come with us for full time for 
the last four months of the year, dividing his time between the pro- 
motion of the work in a few associations and giving us the publicity we 
need, utilizing the Recorder, Charity and Children, the daily papers and 
in particular the county papers, as well as the radio. 

7. The Board heard the report and recommendations of the com- 
mittee which had been appointed to visit the Forest Avenue and Boone 
fields for the purpose of investigating the church building needs at these 
two points. We give here for the information of the Convention the 
report of this committee, together with the recommendations : 

We, your committee, with the exception of Dr. Cree who was sick 
and could not go, visited the Forest Avenue field and the Boone field on 
May 30 and 31, 1935. We spent several hours at each place and can- 
vassed the situations pretty thoroughly. We found the following con- 
ditions existed : 

Forest Avenue Church 

1. The church has a membership of about 500. The church has 
grown in every way in recent years under the capable leadership of Wil- 
son Woodcock. More recently there has been a fine growth in the 
Sunday school under the leadership of Dr. J. T. J. Battle, the superin- 
tendent. 

2. The plant is old, dilapidated, unattractive, too small, and situated 
on an unpaved street less than a block from the tracks of the Southern 
railway. 

3. In the last three years the local congregation has purchased a 
most desirable lot and most of the necessary excavation has been done, 
all at a total cost of around $10,000. 

4. The Board has made no investment there in the church plant, al- 
though it has been helping for some time on pastor's salary. In this 
connection it will be remembered that we have an investment of some 
fifty or sixty thousand at Chapel Hill, ten to fifteen at Cullowhee and 
about eighteen at Boone. Also we are this year helping the church at 
Wingate and the church at Murfreesboro to take care of their indebt- 
edness. 

5. There are four or five hundred Baptist girls at the Women's 
College of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and the 
location for the proposed church building is on the edge of one of the 
most substantial residential sections of Greensboro. Moreover, it is a 
growing section. 

Boone Church 

1. The educational plant which was completed some two or three 
years ago is quite adequate to the needs at Boone. As stated above, the 
Board has made an investment of about $18,000, and at the present time 
owes a balance of about $1,200 on the previous commitment. The con- 



Annual of Session 1935 77 

gregation at Boone owes a total of about $7,500 on the educational plant, 
with the $1,200 still due by the Board as a part of the $7,500 outstanding. 

2. The old church with its auditorium has been abandoned and is not 
now being used. The auditorium in use in the present educational build- 
ing is wholly inadequate. 

3. The committee of the Boone church estimates that with the use of 
the material in the old church, brick, timber and windows, the audi- 
torium can be completed at a cost of about $20,000, including labor 
which will be donated. The completion of this auditorium will provide 
an adequate church building for years to come. It will be attractive 
and useful. 

4. It should be added that while we aid in the payment of the pastor's 
salary at Chapel Hill, Greensboro and Cullowhee, we do not pay any- 
thing on pastor's salary at Boone, nor is it contemplated that the church 
will need our help for this purpose. 

5. We consider this situation one of the most challenging in the 
state. There are about a thousand students there during a greater part 
of the year, as they have around eight hundred to a thousand students 
during the summer. Any money expended there would, in our judgment, 
be a fine investment. The students are predominantly Baptist in mem- 
bership or preference. 

Recommendations 

1. Forest Avenue Church: We recommend that during each of the 
years 1936, 1937 and 1938 the Board undertake to set aside $5,000 a year, 
or a total of $15,000, to be used in the construction of an educational 
plant for the Forest Avenue Church. It is believed that the local con- 
gregation will be able to raise or borrow for a short time a sufficient 
amount to construct the building, which it is estimated will cost in the 
neighborhood of $40,000. The plans for the complete plant, which have 
been adopted by the congregation and paid for, contemplate a building 
that will cost from ninety to ninety-five thousand dollars. Concerning 
the construction of the completed plant we would recommend that this 
matter be held in abeyance until such time as the educational plant shall 
be built and paid for. 

2. Boone Church: We recommend that the Board undertake to pay to 
the treasurer of the Boone church for the purpose of completing the 
plant a total of $13,500, to be paid over a period of ten years beginning 
with November 1936; for the years 1936 to 1940 $1,500 a year and for 
the years 1941 to 1945 inclusive $1,200 a year. With this amount from 
the Board the committee from the Boone church would be responsible 
for all interest payments on any amount they might have to borrow to 
complete the plant, the Board in no case being responsible for any interest 
payments. 

The Board approved the report of this special committee, but no action 
was taken on the matter because of the provisions of Art. VII, Section 5 
of the Constitution of the Convention. In lieu thereof the General Sec- 
retary was instructed to include these recommendations in his report to 
the Convention for consideration by that body. 

8. Dr. Cullom, for the committee on inter-church cooperation, sub- 
mitted a verbal report, and at his suggestion the committee was con- 
tinued and instructed to make a definite report at the meeting of the 
Board just preceding the meeting of the State Convention in November. 



78 X. C. Baptist State Convention 

9. The Board records here, with regret, the loss of R. W. Prevost 
of Andrews, who left the state to accept a pastorate in Knoxville, Tenn., 
and J. L. Carrick, who has accepted a pastorate in Virginia. At the 
June meeting of the Board John R. Jester, in view of his intention to 
leave North Carolina, submitted his resignation to the Board. Because 
of his long and faithful service as President of the Board and because 
of his deep interest in the work of the Convention, appropriate resolu- 
tions were adopted and spread upon the minutes of the Board. We 
record also our keen sense of loss at the home going of Brother John D. 
Berry in August. For more than twenty-five years he served as a mem- 
ber of the General Board, first as a member of the Board of Missions 
and later a member of the General Board. He was likewise for a long 
period a member of the Executive Committee of the Board. In these 
places of service he gave the best he had, proving a faithful steward 
always of the trusts committed to him. Appropriate resolutions were 
also adopted recording appreciation of his services and a keen sense of 
loss in his home going. 



I 

Department of Missions 

107. A. HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONS 

During the twelve months ending September 30, 1935, we have for- 
warded for all southwide objects $148,803.53, including both designated 
and undesignated funds. During a corresponding period ending Septem- 
ber 30, 1934, we forwarded $120,208.34, a gain of $28,595.29. In this 
amount is included $6,195.79 designated for the Baptist Hundred Thou- 
sand Club. Undesignated funds for southwide objects, after deducting 
$25,000 annually for Southern Baptist Convention Bonds, are divided as 
follows : 

Per Cent 

Foreign Mission Board 50 

Home Mission Board 23 1/3 

Relief and Annuity Board 7 

Education Board 3 1/3 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 4 1/5 

Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 4 1/5 

Baptist Bible Institute 3 9/10 

W. M. U. Training School^ 8/15 

American Baptist Theological Seminary 1 

New Orleans Baptist Hospital 2 1/2 

100 



Annual of Session 1935 79 

Of course all designated funds, without any deduction whatever, go 
direct to the object specified. It is interesting to note that about 11.8 
per cent of all money received by Southern Convention Boards and 
agencies is given by North Carolina Baptists. 

108. B. STATE MISSIONS 

We rejoice to state that State Missions came to the end of 1934, not 
only with no debt but with a credit balance of about $5,500. This was 
made possible because of a greatly reduced budget during the past three 
years, and because the offering for this particular object was the largest 
since before 1927. 

We are operating during 1935 on an enlarged budget, by virtue of the 
action of the 1934 Convention. No debt, however, is anticipated. We 
make herewith a brief report concerning what has been undertaken, to- 
gether with some brief comments upon the State Mission Program as a 
whole. 

1. The Convention last year authorized the employment of "one gen- 
eral missionary, and possibly two" to hold revivals, promote the Every 
Member Enrollment, and "in general to assist the General Secretary in 
every way possible to promote every interest of our cooperative work." 
When the Board met in December, it was thought wise to employ only 
one. Accordingly Brother M. O. Alexander, then pastor of the First 
Church of Thomasville, was called to this important task ; and on Jan- 
uary 1 he entered upon his duties. We record here our tribute to the 
zeal and intelligence which he has shown in every phase of the work 
which he has undertaken, as well as to his unusually fine cooperative spirit. 
His report, which appears below, reveals, partially, his activities and 
achievements during the first nine months of 1935. 

1. Report of M. 0. Alexander, General Missionary 

Your General Missionary, M. O. Alexander, came with us on January 
1, 1935, and has since that time been engaged in a varied work. 

He has held five meetings, four (4) of eight days each and one (1) 
of fourteen days, with the following churches : Brookford, Washington. 
Rosemary, Siloam, Carrboro. 

Attended eleven (11) Pastors' Conferences. 

Attended two (2) Pastors' Schools of five days each. 

Visited special meetings, spring associational meetings, pastors' asso- 
ciational conferences, etc. (32). 

Supplied twenty-nine (29) pulpits. 

Visited on their fields forty-four (44) of our Missionary Pastors. 

Visited and conferred with eighteen (18) churches requesting ap- 
propriations for building purposes, either repairs or to apply on debts. 

Visited and spoke to fifteen (15) associations in their annual meetings. 



80 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Met with nineteen (19) Associational Promotion Committees and 
planned with them for Stewardship Schools in the churches of their 
associations, together with other promotion plans and the Every Member 
Enrollment. 

Delivered two hundred and nine (209) sermons and addresses during 
the year, and held innumerable conferences with churches and organized 
groups. 

The Board has received from the churches helped, as a direct result 
of meetings S369.ll. 

109. 2. Missionary Pastoral Assistance 

We give below a summary of the work done by our 70 missionary 
pastors from October 1, 1934 to September 30, 1935. Let us bear in mind 
that we had 86 in 1930. 47 in 1931. 40 in 1932, 48 in 1933 and 56 in 1934. 
Thus we are on the incline again. Of particular interest is the work 
which Brother E. M. Harris is doing at Sanatorium and Samarcand. It 
is not possible to record in figures the true significance of this work. 
It is of deep and abiding human interest, and Brother Harris rejoices to 
minister to those who are sick at Sanatorium and to those at Samarcand 
who have fallen by the way. The summary follows : 

Number of Missionary Pastors 70 

Number Churches Served 150 

Number Sermons 6,482 

Other Addresses 2.307 

Revivals Held 164 

Training Schools Conducted 173 

Visits Made 15,102 

Conversions 1,390 

Baptisms 957 

Other Additions 639 

Churches Repaired or Being Built 45 

Amount Paid on Building and Repairs $11,972.78 

Amount Paid on Pastors' Salaries $30,614.42 

Gifts to Convention Objects $ 9.337.14 

Subscriptions to Charity and Children 121 

Subscriptions to Biblical Recorder 104 

Subscriptions to Home and Foreign Fields 19 

Subscriptions to Royal Service 6 

110. 3. Church Building Aid 

The Board is doing what it can to aid churches here and there in 
lifting debts on buildings, constructing new churches and in repairing 
others. It is our hope that this year we shall be able to aid, in small 
amounts to be sure, about eighteen churches. A list of those approved 
so far follows : 



Annual of Session 1935 81 

Church Association 

Murf reesboro West Chowan 

Wingate Union 

Grants Creek Atlantic 

Boone Three Forks 

Goldston Sandy Creek 

Lemon Springs Sandy Creek 

Gold Hill Rowan 

Mt. Vernon South Mountain 

Jonas Ridge Avery 

Montford Cove Green River 

Little Mountain Surry 

Simmons Grove Surry 

Beulah Robeson 

Union Valley Cape Fear Columbus 

Peppers Creek Blue Ridge 

Refuge Carolina 

Swan Quarter Pamlico 

111. 4. Indian Work 

We report the continuance of Rev. and Mrs. M. C. Lunsford among 
the Indians of Robeson County, and record our appreciation of the 
splendid work which they have done and are doing there. 

During the year Rev. W. F. Sinclair resigned the work at Cherokee 
and accepted the pastorate at Robbinsville and general mission work in 
Graham County. Dr. W. H. Fitzgerald took up the work at Cherokee 
soon after the resignation of Brother Sinclair. By patience, tact and 
perseverance, and by virtue of his deep interest in the Indians, he is 
beginning what promises to be a genuinely substantial work among them. 
The appropriation for these two fields is now $2,800. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Fitzgerald of Cherokee send the following word 
about the work there : 

Looking back over six months' labor here we can thank God and take 
courage. The Indians have a lean toward religion, as such, in tradition 
and by missionary contact, but not sufficiently evangelical and zealous of 
good work. Spiritual tide is low. Organization is difficult. Cooperation 
is hard to secure. They got much conservatism from our forefathers. 
Better teaching must come slowly. The Indian cannot be pushed or 
hurried. A spiritual awakening is our hope. Young people are showing 
interest. We have some prospective young preachers. Have organized 
B. T. U, W. M. S., Sunbeams; had D. V. B. S. and Training School. 
We need help. Would some Sunday school like to be a big brother to 
one of our churches? 

112. 5. The Work With Our Negro Brothers 

You authorized last year the resumption of some cooperative work 
among our Negro brothers. The Board was authorized to "make an 



82 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

appropriation sufficient to cover at least one half the salary of an able 
man." This the Board did. The search then began for the man. The 
General Baptist State Convention, which is the name of the Negro State 
Convention, at length proposed the name of W. C. Somerville, then 
pastor at Rocky Mount. To this we agreed. After declining the work 
for a time he finally accepted and entered upon his duties on March 1. 
One cannot record in figures the far-reaching effect of his work. How- 
ever, the brief summary given below does show that he has given him- 
self with abandon to the strenuous task of arousing, enlisting and 
unifying the great host of about 250,000 Negro Baptists of the state. 
This report covers his activities from March 1 through September 30. 
What a gratifying report ! His task has been : 

To establish confidence among our churches in the General Conven- 
tion. 

To develop good will and fellowship among our constituency. 

To build up a steady support of the objects for which our Convention 
stands. 

To provide for the training and development of the membership. 

To outline and promote sane evangelism. 

To visit and have personal contact with as many ministers as possible. 

To assist in the organization of Daily Vacation Bible Schools and 
Leadership Training Courses. 

To hold Ministers' Conferences in an effort to arouse the ministers to 
a support of the Convention's program and greater usefulness. 

During the 7 months period Brother Somerville has : 

Traveled 15,818 miles, preached 76 sermons, delivered 121 lectures, 
visited 187 ministers, spoken to approximately 15,575 persons at various 
meetings, visited 19 associations and conventions, held 27 Ministers' 
Conferences. 

113. 6. The Oteen Mission 

We record again our appreciation of the distinguished work which 
Brother Wayne W. Williams continues to do at Oteen, both in the hos- 
pital and in the church. Moreover, his contacts and influence with the 
pastors in the western part of the state is wholesome and helpful to the 
whole State Mission enterprise. Concerning the work at Oteen, we re- 
joice that other states appreciate the work he is doing to the extent 
that they are having some share in its maintenance. A brief report from 
Mr. Williams follows : 

Mingled lights and shadows, like sunshine and rain, have fallen across 
our pathway during this, the ninth, year of our ministry to the sick 
soldiers on this unique mission field. Through the years it has been a 
blessed privilege to bring a little sunshine into shadowed lives in the 
name of the Christ who said, "I was sick and ye visited me." Our min- 
istry is a twofold one. 



Annual of Session 1935 83 

First, there is the work within the hospital itself. There are 800 
patients, all of them tubercular. They come from practically every state 
of the Southern Baptist Convention. Baptists outnumber all others — 
approximately forty per cent. The boys die on an average of four a 
week. During the year that is past sinners have been saved ; saints have 
been comforted; the gospel has been preached over the Government 
radio station to every bed; Christian literature has been distributed; 
letters have been written home to loved ones ; the dead have been buried ; 
relatives and friends have been brought to and from the trains, and 
many other services too numerous to mention have been rendered. 

Second, there is the work among the wives and children of the men 
in the community adjoining the hospital, many of whom have come to 
be near their dear ones in what often proves to be their last battle. This 
is, in our humble opinion, just as important as the work within the hos- 
pital proper. Five years ago, we built a little church to serve the 
families of the men. Here many of them find salvation, comfort, and 
strength. We have now 240 members, an average of 150 in Sunday 
school, and five B. T. U.'s. During the summer a gracious revival was 
held, B. E. Morris, Statesville, doing the preaching. A fine group of 
thirty-five were baptized, most of them sons and daughters of the dis- 
abled veterans. 

114. 7. Pastors' Schools and Conferences 

The Convention in its last session committed the whole matter of 
providing for Pastors' Schools and Conferences to the Board, with the 
authorization that a representative committee be appointed who after 
study "will determine upon the best plans for reaching all of our pastors." 

Accordingly a special committee was appointed to work in conjunc- 
tion with the General Secretary. The result was that 14 pastors' con- 
ferences were held in various parts of the state. It is hardly too much 
to say that probably no more significant meetings have been held in many 
years. The Secretary was assisted by Walt. N. Johnson, General Mis- 
sionary M. O. Alexander, and missionary pastor J. C. Pipes. About 400 
pastors attended these meetings. 

Then, for the first time, three pastors' schools were held, one at 
Meredith, one at Mars Hill, and one, in connection with the Assembly, 
at Murfreesboro. The program directors were T. H. King, H. W. 
Baucom and J. L. Carrick. To these the thanks of the Board are due 
in generous measure. The faculty was superb, and the platform hours 
were challenging and inspirational. By special arrangement we supplied 
the Duke school with two platform speakers, viz, E. M. Poteat, Sr., and 
Walt. N. Johnson, and they in turn sent us H. W. McLaughlin and 
James Moffatt. 

In spite of such an array of talented teachers and speakers, and in 



84 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

spite of a very low rate for room and board, only about 225 pastors 
availed themselves of this unexcelled opportunity. Surely every pastor 
ought to set aside one week in which he can join with his fellow pastors 
for meditation, study and fellowship. He Owes it to himself, to the 
work, and to God. We must find a way — must search until we find it — 
to bring together all our pastors into these quiet places of understanding, 
of vision, and of fellowship. 

115. 8. The Pastors' Circulating Library 

We record here a brief word about a new feature which has been 
undertaken, as a part of our State Mission Program. The idea was 
suggested to the General Secretary last year by Brother D. J. Robinson, 
pastor in the West Chowan Association. Why not establish a circulating 
library in the office at Raleigh so that pastors, who were unable to buy 
some of the books they wanted and needed, might have access to such 
books ? Indeed, why not ? As we thought upon it and as we realized 
that probably eighty per cent of our pastors, especially rural pastors, 
do not have sufficient income to keep them fit for Kingdom service, the 
idea took root. It was presented to the Board in the December meeting, 
and a small appropriation was made, so that a start might be made and 
postage furnished for transporting the books from the Raleigh office to 
the pastors. An appeal was then made to pastors who had books which 
they could give or lend. To date about 500 have been acquired, all of 
these as gifts or loans. Space forbids a list of those who have made 
gifts or loans. Mention should be made, however, of the fact that the 
widows of several -pastors have given a part of the books left by their 
husbands. Our thanks are due them, and we here list their names : Mrs. 
C. M. Billings, Mrs. T. W. O'Kelley. 

Up to October 15 about 450 books had been loaned, most of these 
going to pastors who in these trying years have been unable to satisfy 
their thirst for the printed word. 

116. 9. Sunday School, B. T. U. and Student Work 

The Program of the Sunday school department continues under the 
vigorous and consecrated leadership of Perry Morgan and L. L. Morgan. 
We call attention again, in particular, to the Sunday School Revivals. In 
another part of this report, it will be seen that the number of non- 
cooperating churches is being reduced. This, in no small measure, is 
due to these Sunday School Revivals. To be sure it is a sort of by- 
product, but it is none the less a very valuable by-product. In securing 
better and larger Sunday schools, in training better teachers, and in many 
other ways, these revivals are without question a very vital part of our 
aggressive Sunday school program. 



Annual of Session 1935 85 

Substantial progress is the order also in the B. T. U. department. 
We record our appreciation of the far-reaching service which Miss Rick- 
ett and Miss Starnes are rendering. Your attention is called especially to 
the increase in the number of unions, to the emphasis which is being 
placed upon the study of missions by our young people, and upon the use 
of religious literature. Our young people deserve the best ; and we be- 
lieve they are getting it. 

Miss Cleo Mitchell remains on as sole full time representative among 
the thousands of students in the colleges. She needs to give her full time 
at Greensboro ; and we need greatly to place a full time representative at 
Boone and at Duke in the very near future. 

The reports of these three departments follow. 

117. (1) REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOL WORK 

Perry Morgan, Secretary of the Department 

The world's greatest preacher and best teacher, Jesus Christ, placed 
teaching the gospel next to preaching the gospel. He said "Go ye into 
all the world and preach the gospel to every creature, teaching them to 
observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you." It is in obedience 
to His command that churches maintain the Sunday school. 

Teaching the scriptures is a charge of major importance committed 
to New Testament churches. 

The Apostle Paul writing to Timothy says "All scripture is given 
by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for 
correction, for instruction in righteousness ; that the man of God may 
be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works. I charge thee 
therefore before God, and the Lord Jesus Christ, preach the word; make 
full proof of thy ministry." 

The Sunday school has rendered a ministry that has been a powerful 
barrier to error and doubt. It has counteracted a flood of evil influences 
which have threatened through the years to engulf every vestige of 
Christianity as a vitalizing force in the world. It is a channel through 
which Christians commit to faithful men the things which they have 
heard of Him whom to know aright is life eternal. 

Characterizing the Year 

The year has been one of unusual, not to say strange characteristics. 
Some of the characteristics of the year are : 

1. A year of exceptional opportunity. The opportunity to improve 
the quality of teaching done in the Sunday school. The New Training- 
Course has been available to all for instruction in the doctrines of the 
Bible and in the faith of our fathers, for mastery in teaching method, 
for intellectual and cultural values needed to make full proof of the 
ministry of teaching. 



86 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

2. It has been a year of generous response on the part of the 
churches. The objectives of the Sunday School Department have been 
accepted with great favor by the churches. To teach the word and make 
the word vital in the lives of people, win the lost and make virile vigorous 
and useful Christians are seen as great objectives by all. 

3. A gracious response by individuals. An unusual characteristic 
of the year has been the hearty response given by individuals to do 
volunteer work in the field of teacher training. 

4. The state of public health hindered some major plans. June 
the first saw many of our Sunday schools closed to all departments and 
classes up through the Juniors. On this account attendance by Inter- 
mediates, Young People and Adults was cut down considerably. Our 
people were almost paralyzed with fear of the epidemic of infantile 
paralysis which swept through the state. About six hundred cases were 
reported. The schools have not yet regained all of the pupils. Never 
before has Sunday school attendance been suspended so completely on 
any account in North Carolina. 

5. Volunteer projects undertaken. Much of the fear caused by 
the epidemic of poliomyelitis subsided by the beginning of September. 
After that time we were privileged to resume field operations and Simul- 
taneous Volunteer Training Schools were conducted in six Associations. 

6. Numerous calls for help unanswered. During the year many 
urgent calls for help came to the Department that were never answered 
because there was no one to go. They came from every section of the 
state and from every type of church in rural as well as urban sections. 

7. A time of renewed interest in building church houses. Many 
congregations have remodeled and enlarged their Sunday school equip- 
ment. Some have built new houses providing for larger Sunday school 
attendance. The return of a measure of prosperity to rural churches 
has quickened interest in church building. Likewise several city churches 
have launched building projects. 

8. The trend in pl'blic morals has been downward. Witness the 
change in attitude toward liquor and the sale of beverage alcohol. Hardly 
had the liquor interests recovered from the shock they received when our 
state voted 184,000 majority in favor of retaining the Eighteenth Amend- 
ment to the Federal Constitution when a presumably dry state legislature 
passed laws allowing sixteen counties to establish liquor stores. Drunk- 
enness is increasing daily. The mania for speed on the public highways 
coupled with the drinking of alcoholic beverages is taking an immense 
toll of human life. Our government seems impotent in the face of the 
mad rush for alcohol and speed. The Sunday school has done much in 
the past to stem the tide of intemperance. It must function now as 
never before. 

9. The year has been one of challenge to moral forces. We are 



Annual of Session 1935 37 

learning that moral forces and leaders cannot slumber serenely while 
evil stalks abroad in the land. They must awake to the fact that they 
should seize upon the Sunday school and bring it to a state of efficiency 
that will enable us to combat the flood of evil that threatens to engulf 
the forces of right and stamp out Christianity as a vital force in the 
world. "Awake, awake, put on strength ; hearken unto me, ye that know 
righteousness, the people in whose heart is my law." 

An All-South Conference 

The Fifth Southern Baptist Sunday School Conference was held in 
the City of Raleigh, January 1-4, 1935. More than three thousand people 
from all the states in the Southern Baptist Convention attended the 
sessions. 

No State Conference Held 

No State-wide meeting was held this year because the Fifth Southern 
Baptist Sunday School Conference was held in North Carolina so near 
the beginning of the year. 

State Convention, Charlotte, January 21-23, 1936 

That our people may not lack anything in inspiration for their Sunday 
school work there will be held in the City of Charlotte, at the First 
Baptist Church, January 21-23, 1936, an All-State Convention for Sun- 
day school workers. The key note of the Convention will be "Jesus 
taught them, saying" — 

Some Major Activities in the Department 

Rural Enlargement Campaigns and Sunday School Revivals were con- 
ducted in three Associations with success. These were the Union, Sandy 
Creek and Randolph. Enlargement Campaigns and Sunday School Re- 
vivals scheduled in the Liberty and Beulah Associations were cancelled 
on account of the epidemic of infantile paralysis in the state. How- 
ever, seven of the churches in the Pamlico Association had fine results 
in Enlargement. They were Belhaven, Engelhard, Fairfield, North Lake, 
Rose Bay, Swan Quarter and Sladeville. A church was constituted at 
Sladeville as a result. 

In the 96 churches taking part in rural Enlargement Campaigns 5,210 
people were reached for study in training classes using the book "Build- 
ing a Standard Sunday School." A religious census made revealed 26,730 
possibilities for the Sunday schools, an enrollment of 11,843, an average 
attendance for the previous three months of 6,873, a resident church 
membership of 10,744, number of people nine years of age and over not 
church members 8,616, number of officers and teachers found was 1,223. 
In these Campaigns 256 new Sunday school classes were set up and 767 



88 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

new teachers and officers were enlisted and put to work to enlist more 
people in Bible study. 

Assisting in Rural Revival and Enlargement Campaign work were 
Perry Morgan, L. L. Morgan, Robert Costner, Ruth Snipes, Jeff Beale, 
R. Knolan Benfield, Mrs. R. Knolan Benfield, Mary Chandler, Dorothy 
Crutchfield, Brownlow Hastings, Bruce Ousley, Falk Johnson, Ruth 
Tucker, James M. Wilder, Jr., George Griffin, Mildred Brooks, Edd 
Schaible, Harry D. Wood, Jr., Mattie Kate Thomas, Mildred Thomas, 
Louise Paschal, Miriam Early, Jesse Wester, Frances Currin, Velma 
Preslar, Ollin J. Owen, Ruth Preslar, Mabel Stroup, Flora Mae Caven- 
augh, Bill Dancy, Maude Jones, Lois Morgan, Billie Ruth Currin, and 
Ruby Daniel. Dr. B. W. Spilman and Secretary J. N. Barnette gave 
valuable help in preparing our workers for the Campaigns. We are 
greatly indebted to Superintendent I. G. Greer and all the other workers 
at Mills Home for the privilege of spending four days, June 19-22, on 
the campus in a period of intensive study and training for the work 
prior to going on the field. 

2. Volunteer training schools. William B. Batts, Superintendent, 
Nash County Sunday School Association, which embraces twenty of the 
sixty-nine churches of the Roanoke Association planned and conducted 
training schools using volunteer teachers. More than five hundred people 
were enrolled in the training classes. Vance A. Browning led the Ten- 
nessee River Association in its third year of volunteer schools with class 
attendance exceeding 1,500. Fred Jervis led twenty of the thirty-nine 
churches in the French Broad Association in Volunteer Schools. A. G. 
Hamrick and J. A. Hunnicutt led thirty-four churches in the Sandy Run 
Association in' a week of training, using local volunteer teachers. In the 
Kings Mountain Association thirty-eight of the churches held training 
schools simultaneously. Volunteer teachers led the classes. More than 
five hundred teacher training awards were granted in this one project. 
J. W. Costner, Superintendent, was the leader. Twenty churches led by 
J. T. Allen held simultaneous schools in the Raleigh Association. In 
the Liberty Association Walter L. Warfford led a similar group. G. C. 
Hewitt of the South Fork, D. L. Friday and David E. Bobbitt of the 
Gaston were the directors of volunteer schools in these Associations. A 
total of 175 churches took part in this type of school. 

3. Special campaigns and single projects. While attention was 
given to rural work the Department of Sunday School Work has not 
neglected urban sections. A number of city churches have held Enlarge- 
ment Campaigns. Conferences, weeks of training in schools and col- 
leges, Associational Conventions, district rallies, assemblies at Chowan 
College and in the South Yadkin Association at Harmony have claimed 
the attention of the Sunday School Department. 



Annual of Session 1935 89 

Conference for Associational Superintendents 

A constructive conference was held at the First Church, Concord, 
October 3-5 for Associational Superintendents. Secretary J. N. Barnette 
of Nashville and State Field Worker John Maguire of Montgomery, 
Alabama, rendered valuable service. The Sunday School Board at Nash- 
ville gave financial assistance. 

Associations Organized for Better Work 

The following Associations with superintendents are organized for 
advancing their Sunday school work. The State Leader is Vance A. 
Browning, Bryson City. Anson, H. C. Hasty, Wadesboro ; Atlantic, 
R. T. Willis, Jr., Oriental ; Avery, K. L. Haga. Newland ; Beulah, J. C. 
McGregor, Jalong ; Bladen, R. J. Hester, Sr., Elizabethtown ; Blue Ridge, 
A. H. Mitchem, Marion; Brier Creek, Gus Myers, New Castle; Bruns- 
wick, Z. G. Ray, Ash ; Buncombe, W. S. Johnson, West Asheville ; 
Cabarrus, Carl Mills, Concord; Caldwell, C. A. Keller, Collettsville ; 
Cape Fear-Columbus, Neil Thompson, Whiteville ; Carolina, D. G. 
Wilkie, Tuxedo; Chowan, L. W. Holloman, Elizabeth City; Flat River, 
W. B. Jones, Stem ; French Broad, Fred Jervis, Mars Hill ; Gaston, 
D. L. Friday, Dallas ; Green River, W. C. Lynch, Rutherfordton ; Hay- 
wood, G. D. Brown, Clyde ; Kings Mountain, J. W. Costner, Lawndale ; 
Liberty, Walter L. Warfford, Lexington ; Little River, G. G. Page, 
Buie's Creek ; Macon, E. B. DeHart, Franklin ; Mecklenburg, Ben F. 
Fa veil, Charlotte; Montgomery, W. H. Shaw, Troy; Mount Zion, W. P. 
Phillips, Jr., Durham; Nash County, Wm. B. Batts, Rocky Mount; 
Neuse, A. V. Washburn, Goldsboro ; New Found, Ira Plemmons, Hot 
Springs ; New South River, J. R. Thagard, Cedar Creek ; Pamlico, Roy 
Litchfield, Creswell ; Pee Dee, C. C. Reece, Gibson ; Piedmont, Frank L. 
Paschall, Greensboro; Pilot Mountain, E. F. Baker, Kernersville ; Ral- 
eigh, J. T. Allen, Wendell; Randolph, J. H. Mitchell, Franklinville ; 
Roanoke, J. P. Matthews, Nashville ; Robeson, A. B. Wood, Maxton ; 
Rowan, R. O. Brinkley, China Grove; Sandy Creek, J. B. Whitley, Siler 
City ; Sandy Run. A. G. Hamrick, Rutherfordton ; South Fork, G. C. 
Hewitt, Newton ; South Mountain, E. L. McDaniel, Mooresboro ; South 
Yadkin, C. C. Fox, Statesville ; Stanly, Henry R. Greene, Albemarle ; 
Stony Fork, Carl Triplett, Blowing Rock ; Surry, C. A. Simmons, Mount 
Airy; Tar River, J. Edward Allen, Warrenton ; Tennessee River, Vance 
A. Browning, Bryson City; Three Forks, S. C. Eggers, Boone; Transyl- 
vania, N. L. Ponder, Brevard ; Tuckaseigee, D. A. Norman, Sylva ; 
Union, T. L. Price, Monroe ; West Chowan, W. V. Tarlton, Rich 
Square ; West Liberty, Fred Stiles, Murphy ; Western North Carolina, 
W. A. Adams. Grandview ; Yadkin, M. F. Reavis, Yadkinville ; and 
Yancey, S. E. Tilson, Burnsville. 



90 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Vacation Bible Schools 

The season began auspiciously in this field. On the first of June 
there were fine prospects for 140 schools. Thirty-two schools were going 
when the epidemic of poliomyelitis struck the state. Some of them 
suspended at the end of the second day while nearly all of them closed 
at the end of the first week. They did not open again. Plans made for 
schools by nearly a hundred churches did not materialize. A survey 
shows that forty-eight schools were held. Again we had the support 
and financial assistance of the Sunday School Board at Nashville in 
promoting this work. 

Surveying: the Needs 

A survey of the Sunday school field reveals some urgent needs. 

1. Trained workers are needed. Awards given for Teacher Train- 
ing during the year number 5,756. There should be a training class in 
every church. 

2. Equipment. Every school should be equipped for better teaching. 
Many of the small churches have scant equipment such as class rooms, 
chairs, blackboard, teacher training books, libraries, song books, and 
musical instruments. 

3. Leadership is needed. Lack of leaders is evident in many 
churches large and small. There is urgent need for consecrated but 
vigorous leadership that is trained and has a vision of the Sunday school 
task. 

4. More workers are needed. A division of labor is a paramount 
need. Too few are engaged in the work. To every man his work. 
Talents are tucked away in a napkin. Pastors are urged to be good over- 
seers and take heed to all the flock dividing out the work. 

5. A larger program. A larger program that challenges the whole 
of the church membership. A program that includes teaching, training, 
visiting, evangelism, preaching more often in many churches, giving to 
Missions and benevolences, and Annual Enrollment of all of our people 
in all of our work. 

6. A new conception of the sunday school. A conception that 
will make our people Sunday school-minded. A revelation of what the 
Sunday school really is and what it can be used to accomplish in bring- 
ing in the Kingdom of our Lord. 

7. A new valuation of the sunday school. The work of the Sun- 
day school is to disseminate and diffuse truth. Jesus said "Ye shall know 
the truth and the truth shall make you free." The march of truth is 
central in Sunday school work. It is essential in Christian education 
that seeks to make desirable changes in human character and conduct. 
It is a means of preparing the way for evangelism, making evangelism 
more effective and following up evangelism making it more fruitful. 



Annual of Session 1935 91 

Its objective is to win the lost for Christ, help Christians acquire val- 
uable knowledge, develop right attitudes, make right choices, live the 
abundant life, and to develop Christian character. 

8. A proper appreciation of the Sunday school. An importance 
needs to be accorded the Sunday school such as never before given it 
for what it has done and for what it can do if properly used to magnify 
preaching, promote preaching attendance, secure universal study of the 
Bible, teach the great Christian doctrines, teach and train in Missionary 
practices, progagate distinctive Baptist principles, build citizenship, teach 
regard for law and authority and stabilize human society. 

9. A renewed acceptance of the sunday school. The churches 
should accept the Sunday school with renewed assurance that no insti- 
tution, religious, educational, fraternal, or otherwise is doing more to 
combat evil, correct error, right wrongs, extend purifying influences, and 
determine the destiny of the human race than is the Sunday school. 

10. The horizon extended. There are needy and destitute places 
where Sunday schools should be organized. The circle should be en- 
larged. Expansion, multiplication, growth, extension, and progress have 
always been fundamental principles and preeminent characteristics of 
Baptists. To cease our activities at this point will be contrary to the 
pioneer Baptist spirit of progress and to the heroic conquering ideals of 
other years. 

Look out ! See the throng 

That battles hard against the wrong, 

Lift the light, hold it high ! 

View their struggles, hear their cry! 

Tell it out ! Shout the word ! 

Let the message loudly heard 

Speak "salvation's of the Lord." 

Tell the story face to face 

To hungry souls in lonely place, 

Not of one's self, but by His grace. 

Salvation's had in the Christian's race. 

Other Duties Assumed 

Coupled with Sunday school work the Secretary of the Department 
is charged with heavy duties as Statistical Secretary. It is a tremendous 
task that consumes much of his time during September, October, Novem- 
ber and December. The Secretary also has given much time in the fall 
months to general work assisting the Mission Secretary in promoting 
the Convention's program of Enlistment. 

Workers in the Department 

The Sunday School Department is located at 200 Biblical Recorder 
Building, Raleigh. Perry Morgan is completing his sixteenth year of 
service. Field Worker L. L. Morgan is in his tenth vear with the De- 



92 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

partment. He is faithful, loyal, efficient, wise, experienced, highly 
trained, a very useful servant of the Lord, and a hopeful, enthusiastic, 
upward-looking, untiring and zealous worker. Miss Bessie Morgan con- 
tinues as Office Secretary. She is experienced, capable, and is highly 
appreciated by the Department leaders. Mrs. M. D. Herndon, Gastonia, 
resigned as Approved Extension Department Worker. Mrs. C. D. Bain, 
Dunn, continues as Approved Elementary Worker ; Mrs. John B. Lane, 
Lenoir, remains with the Department as Approved Intermediate Worker; 
Mrs. A. V. Washburn, Goldsboro, and Mrs. F. A. Bower, Albemarle, 
continue as Qualified Elementary Workers. 

Recommendations 

We recommend : 

1. That the Sunday School Department be given larger appropriations 
for field operations and more workers as soon as financial conditions 
will justify the same. 

2. That in view of the pressing needs for advancing all of the pres- 
ent workers be continued in the Department of Sunday School Work. 

3. That all of the pastors give their best support to plans of the 
Department to hold a great State Convention in Charlotte, January 
21-23, 1936. 

4. That the plan of conducting rural enlargement campaigns and re- 
vivals be continued on a cooperative basis by the Training Commission 
of the General Board, the Sunday School Board, the State Sunday 
School Department, the District Associations and the churches. That 
sufficient appropriation be made to finance at least ten Associational 
Revival and Enlargement Campaigns using forty specially selected work- 
ers, chosen by the State Sunday School Secretary, from a group of 
experienced workers and students in our schools, colleges and seminaries. 

5. That North Carolina Baptist Sunday School workers join the 
Sunday School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention in making 
July 19-24, 1936, a really worth while week of Sunday school leadership 
training. 

We Acknowledge 

1. Our gratitude to God for His many blessings upon the work. 

2. Our thanks to our General Secretary who has been so sympathetic, 
thoughtful and patient with us during the year. 

3. Our debt to the Sunday School Board for the support given 
through Dr. I. J. Van Ness the retiring Secretary and Dr. T. L. Hol- 
comb the new Secretary in providing financial aid, special workers, free 
literature, etc. 

4. Genuine affection for our co-workers in all departments of the 
work at Convention headquarters, and a great host of pastors and other 



Annual of Session 1935 93 

church leaders throughout the state who have opened their homes and 
hearts to us as we have gone up and down the land seeking to promote 
the work. 

5. Our debt to the Biblical Recorder and its editor for space in the 
paper to record facts about the work and news notes concerning it. 

We come to the end of the year with thankfulness. We face the 
new year with assurance and a desire to commit that which we have 
heard of Him to faithful men that they may be able to teach others the 
scriptures given by inspiration of the Holy Spirit. 

118. (2) REPORT OF BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 

Winnie Rickett, Secretary 

Mabel Starnes, Field Worker 

Mrs. J. E. Tharrington, Office Secretary 

The past year has been one of marked progress for the Department 
of Baptist Training Union work. Throughout all the activities of the 
Baptist Training Union we have tried to emphasize spiritual values above 
every thing else. We would express our appreciation to those who are 
associated with the department. Miss Mabel Starnes has worked tire- 
lessly and effectively in practically every section of the state. Her life 
has been dedicated to the task during these three years. Mrs. J. E. 
Tharrington has served faithfully in the home office and her quiet loyalty 
has been a constant source of inspiration to us as we have gone over the 
state. 

Fundamentals of Baptist Training: Unions 

Throughout the year we have tried to emphasize fundamental prin- 
ciples of the work. We enthusiastically adopted the name "Baptist 
Training Union" as the name of that department of church work which 
includes all B. Y. P. U.'s and B. A. U's. The training program in the 
local Baptist church for training church members is now called the Bap- 
tist Training Union. In Associations it is called the Associational Bap- 
tist Training Union. But it should be kept in mind that the individual 
units in the Baptist Training Union are still B. Y. P. U.'s and B. A. U's, 
as they have been. We recommend that our workers everywhere use the 
whole name "Training Union," instead of the initials, B. T. U. 

The aim of this organization, "Training in Church Membership," is 
still the same. If a union is to realize its aim there are definite objectives 
which it should attempt to reach. They are loyalty to Christ, church 
loyalty and denominational loyalty. 

Ridgrecrest 

This year we were forced to cancel our State Baptist Training Union 
Convention-Assembly at Ridgecrest because of the infantile paralysis 



94 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

epidemic. However, we were happy to have over three hundred of our 
young people and their leaders at Ridgecrest in August for the Southwide 
Leadership Assembly. The churches who had representatives at this 
meeting profited greatly from the enlarged vision of the representatives. 

Fourth Southwide Training Union Conference 

The Fourth Southwide Baptist Training Union Conference will be 
held in Birmingham, Alabama, December 31, 1935-January 3, 1936. We 
are expecting to have two hundred of our North Carolina young people 
there for the meeting. One feature of the meeting will be the celebration 
of the Fortieth Anniversary of the founding of Southern B. Y. P. U. 
Dr. Van Ness and B. D. Gray, two members of the committee which 
called the first Southwide B. Y. P. U. meeting in 1895, will be there along 
with other pioneers. The program will be varied and interesting. 
Kagawa, of Japan, will draw thousands. Associational leaders, church 
directors, pastors and young people are urged to go. 

Regional Conventions 

In the spring we will hold our tenth series of annual regional meet- 
ings. We are grateful for the splendid work our regional officers have 
done in 1934-'35. Meeting places and dates for 1936 are : Eastern, March 
20-21, Goldsboro ; Southern, March 27-28, Rockingham ; Central, April 
3-4, Green Street, High Point; West Central, April 10-11, Shelby; 
Western, April 17-18, Cullowhee. 

Study Courses 

A number of study course books have been added in each department 
of the work. In addition to the regular courses, during the past year a 
B. A. U. course of study has been planned. Below we list the books that 
are in this course. 

I. Principles and Methods: Book— The B. A. U. Manual, J. E. 
Lambdin. 

II. The Christian Life. (Book not ready.) 

III. Christian Home-Making. (Book not ready.) 

IV. The Church Member and His Church: Books — 1. Growing a 
Church, Burroughs. 2. Honoring the Deaconship, Burroughs. 

V. The Church Member and His Denomination. (Book not ready.) 

VI. The Church Member and the Social Order. (Book not ready.) 

VII. The Church Member and His Bible : Book — Our Doctrines, 
Tribble. 

VIII. Christian Witnessing: Book— The Fine Art of Soul Winning, 
Hamilton. 

IX. The Stewardship of Possessions: Books — 1. Our Lord and Ours, 
Burroughs. 2. Our Church and Ours, Burroughs. 



Annual of Session 1935 95 

X. The Church Member and Missions : Book — Witnessing at Home 
and Around the World. 

Beginning on October 15, 1935, the study course awards will be issued 
from the Sunday School Board at Nashville, Tennessee. Requests for 
awards, however, will still come to the Baptist Training Union Depart- 
ment of our State, where a copy will be kept and another sent to Nash- 
ville. All awards will be free of charge. 

Associational Work 

Our Associational Baptist Training Union work makes it possible for 
us to touch the leaders in various churches. Leadership classes in dif- 
ferent Associations have made possible more effective work in local 
churches. The extension work in our Associations has resulted in many 
new unions, a large number of study courses and a general strengthening 
of Training Union work. It has also been easier for us to foster our 
denominational program with our young people, where the Associational 
unions functioned as they should. 

Number of Unions 

Adult 189 

Senior 1.021 

Intermediate 705 

Junior 726 

Total 2,641 

Baptist Training Unions 471 

Study Course Awards 14,429 

119. (3) STUDENT WORK 

By Cleo Mitchell 

"Statisticians universally agree that in America today there are, in 
round numbers, 1,000,000 college students. Of this one million college 
students, away from home and the home church, 100,000 are Southern 
Baptist students," says Mr. Frank H. Leavell. He says further, "From 
them will come, in large numbers, the trusted leaders, dependable 
pioneers, and faithful workers for all phases of denominational activities 
in the years just ahead. It is more than gratifying that they have heard 
the voice of their denomination, have accepted the program of religious 
activity provided by their denomination, and are faithful in fullest coop- 
eration and enthusiastic promotion of that program." 

In cooperation with the Department of Southern Baptist Student 
Work, North Carolina Baptists seek to minister to the spiritual needs of 
the thousands of our own college young people. "A composite statement 
of the philosophy of the approach of Southern Baptists to their students," 
according to Mr. Leavell, may be given in the following sentences. "They 
approach the students through the churches in the college centers, making 



96 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

the church the central unit of activity in and through which all possible 
religious activity is directed. They ask students to join the local church 
while in college. They afford what literature and leadership is necessary 
to make the religious activities alluring and effective. They give them 
the best of whatever they give and expect the best in return. They seek 
to match the physical and intellectual development of students with a cor- 
responding spiritual development. They encourage scrupulous fidelity of 
students to the local church. They seek to lead them to maintain affec- 
tion for their church as they did before going to college, and as they 
should maintain after college days and throughout life. 

With such loyalty preserved through the college years, thereby bridg- 
ing the four year chasm of the college experience, the more privileged of 
their youth will return to their homes, to their churches, to their district 
associations, and to their states to dedicate their best and their all to the 
advancement of the Kingdom of God throughout the world. Such is our 
aim." The eternal verities of God's Word are uncompromisingly held 
up and we find an acceptance of these in the students' daily living. 

A normal church life is promoted then through emphasis on local 
church membership, personal soul winning, stewardship and missions. 
The organized Sunday school classes, Baptist Training Unions, Young 
Woman's Auxiliaries, and groups of special workers afford training and 
development in all phases of the denominational program. During the 
past year on fourteen of our college campuses Baptist Student Unions 
have functioned. The newest of these organizations is the one at E. C. 
T. C. On the campuses where summer sessions were held the same plan 
of work — linking the student with the church — was continued. Many 
college students last summer proved valuable assets in their local church 
program and in conducting study courses in near by churches. 

The Baptist students of North Carolina working through the Baptist 
Student Unions of the local campus cooperate in a State Baptist Student 
Union organization. Last year Bob Costner, student at Mars Hill, 
served most effectively as president. The far reaching program of the 
recent North Carolina B. S. U. Convention, held in Raleigh October 
25-27, attested to the harmonious cooperation of student, state denomina- 
tional, and Southern Baptist leadership. For the coming year Al Martin, 
student at Wake' Forest, has been elected as president. 

Throughout the South, churches in increasing numbers are observing 
"Student Night at Christmas." This event, the last Sunday night of the 
year, has won its way into the regular program of scores of churches in 
our state. Suggested programs may be secured from the Department of 
Southern Baptist Student Work. 

At Woman's College, University of North Carolina, we have three 
hundred and fifty Baptist students this school year. Already nearly 
three-fourths of them are actively enlisted in the denominational pro- 



Annual of Session 1935 97 

gram. About one-fourth have placed their letters in local Baptist 
churches, and the majority are contributing regularly to the Cooperative 
Program. Plans are in operation for worthy mission love offerings at 
Christmas and in March. Special emphasis is being laid on spiritual 
values. As an aid and encouragement to daily Bible reading, B. T. U. 
Daily Bible Readers' leaflets have been given to each Baptist, and Baptist 
preference, student. Daily prayer for specific changes in the lives of 
individuals and in the group as a whole are offered by prayer mates and 
the group prayer meetings. Study of Christian leadership, soul winning, 
missions and doctrines, in the year's program is already bearing fruit 
in student life. The Baptist Student House, adjacent to the campus, is 
indispensable to the promotion of the program. It serves as office, as a 
meeting place for organization business meetings, prayer, Y. W. A. 
socials, study courses and the like ; and as a "home away from home" for 
each student. 

In the denominational program with our college students today a 
definite need is for student secretaries. Mr. Frank Leavell, Executive 
Secretary of the Department of Southern Baptist Student Work, states 
regarding this : "Spiritual force demands spiritual leadership. Spiritual 
forces among youth especially demand leadership. Accordingly the 
greatest need of the B. S. U. work for its further usefulness is spiritual 
leadership. For such leadership we look to trained workers of post 
graduate experience. Such workers we designate as student secretaries. 
This demand for student secretaries manifests itself in three areas : 
(1) On the local campus; (2) In the state; (3) Southwide. This group 
of workers is steadily growing from year to year. This investment by 
Southern Baptists in character, culture and Christian growth is an in- 
vestment for both time and eternity." In North Carolina at the present 
time we have only two student secretaries : Miss Marguerite Mason at 
Meredith College and Miss Cleo Mitchell at Woman's College, U. N. C. 
A daily schedule of this "spiritual coach" may include interviews with 
students concerning personal problems of doubt, convictions, vocational 
choice, and practical Christianity ; interviews with leaders concerning 
organization plans and problems ; definite planning for each unit organ- 
ization — Sunday school classes, B. T. U.'s, Y. W. A.'s, and study courses; 
conducting prayer meetings ; teaching classes in various denominational 
training programs ; planning recreational activities ; serving as friend 
and adviser to each student; magnifying the church and representing 
Christ on the campus. 

The problems and needs of our college constituency are urgently 
challenging. We must meet the challenge or face the future with many 
of our college trained youth lost to the Master's service. When we 
adequately present Christ and His program to the college youth we find 
him responding with loyalty and faithfulness to the religious leadership 



98 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

of his own denomination. Thus with youth and maturity clasping hands 
in the Master's service we can go forth to make vital the B. S. U. Con- 
vention keynote, "Sharing Christ with a Waiting World." 



II 

Department of Education 

A. REPORT OF THE COLLEGES 

120. l. Wake Forest College 

The chief items of interest for the session 1934-35 were : 

1. The largest enrollment in the history of the College — 1024. 

2. Completion of the New Physical Education Building. 

3. Alterations to the old gymnasium so that the main hall houses the 
Social Science Department, thereby turning over to the Law School the 
entire second floor of the Library Building. The ground floor of the old 
gymnasium now houses the Student Center, consisting of the College 
Book Store, "W" Club, student offices for all publications, namely, Old 
Gold and Black, The Student, and The Howler, offices and assembly room 
for the B. S. U. the Student Council, barber shop, and a large central 
lobby. This Student Center is serving a great need. The old gymnasium 
thus becomes one of the most useful buildings on the campus. 

Additions to the faculty for the present session are as follows : 
Dean Dale F. Stansbury and Professor Walter H. Coulson have been 
added to the Law Faculty, Doctor H. D. Parcell to the French Depart- 
ment, and Professor M. J. Haygood to the English Department. 

121. 2. Meredith College 

Our registrations for session 1935-1936 number at this date 503. This 
is approximately what it was same date a year ago. Of this number 403 
are boarding students, 69 are day students, and 31 are specials. They 
register from two foreign countries and fourteen states. Seventy-six 
counties of North Carolina are represented. 

Miss Janie Parker, who had held so efficiently the position of As- 
sistant Dean of Women, resigned at the close of the session of 1934-1935. 
To succeed Miss Parker the Trustees secured Miss Hazel Clark of New 
Jersey. Miss Clark has had special training for that work as well as 
successful experience in the administration of such an office. She has 
made an excellent beginning at Meredith. 

Miss Elizabeth Foster comes to us to fill the vacancy created by the 
resignation of Miss Carolyn Peacock as instructor in English. Miss 
Foster has two degrees from the University of Texas and has had 
further study at Yale. Her experience in teaching includes faculty con- 



Annual of Session 1935 99 

nections both at the University of Texas and the University of Maine. 
She is giving excellent satisfaction. 

Miss Virginia Branch, of our Music Department, is away this session 
and Miss Mary Lee, who is a graduate of that department, is supplying 
the place most acceptably. 

Miss Carolyn Wray, a graduate of Meredith College, has been added 
to our teaching staff as instructor in ancient languages and psychology. 
She is making an excellent start. 

Operating expenses have been met in full. There is no deficit. Last 
year the faculty took a cut of ten per cent in salaries. It is hoped that 
it will be possible to pay full salaries throughout the current session. 

122. 3. Chowan College 

Chowan College opened this fall with an enrollment equal to that of 
last year. There is an increase in the number of dormitory students. 
Though it was necessary for us to open school without a president, due 
to the sudden death of Dr. Edwards, work has gone along smoothly. 
Students and faculty have exhibited a fine spirit of cooperation. 

During the summer a number of the dormitory rooms were renovated. 
New floors were laid and the walls and woodwork were painted. Also, 
some changes are being made in the heating plant to insure more efficient 
heating of the buildings and to make it possible to heat the water in the 
swimming pool. 

123. 4 Mars Hill College 

Enrollment: On October 15, 1935, the enrollment is 568 — in junior 
college 494, Academy 56, special 18; while the 1934-35 enrollment was 
535. Thirty-eight are ministerial students, and six are children of 
missionaries. 

Faculty : Miss Pierce is away on leave for study at Cornell complet- 
ing work for the Doctor's degree. Miss Gregg is out for the fall term 
on account of illness. Miss Annie Brackett, former teacher and pupil, 
is supplying in the English department and Mr. C. H. Beale, graduate 
of Richmond and Peabody colleges, is taking overflow classes in the 
department of history. Mrs. Thomas Rogers is acting Dean of women 
for the present session. 

Summer School: The opening of a division of the Wake Forest- 
Meredith Summer School at Mars Hill is a significant event. Under 
the direct supervision of Professor B. Y. Tyner of Meredith College, 
assisted by Dean Carr of Mars Hill, excellent work was done. The 
faculty was capable, the students enthusiastic, and the enrollment (212) 
encouraging for a new undertaking. There is a large place in Western 
North Carolina for this liberal arts summer school. 

Improvements : The W. F. Robinson Memorial Infirmary costing 
$10,000 was occupied, though only partially furnished, at the opening of 



100 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

the session, and a new heating system for the Gymnasium and Adminis- 
tration building was installed during the opening weeks. New equip- 
ment has been purchased for the library and the grounds have been 
beautified. A thousand dollar gift for the endowment, donor unknown, 
is acknowledged and $2,000 are in hand as the beginning of a fund for 
a new Girls Home. 

Intangibles : Some things cannot be tabulated or computed — the value 
of the good-will of our friends, the loyalty of former students, spiritual 
tone, the indefinable thing called atmosphere, and the faith that sees and 
holds on. In these things we hope that real progress has been made. 
There is need to enlarge the place of our tent and to strengthen the 
stakes, and the cooperation of our friends everywhere is coveted as a 
program of enlargement is envisioned. 

124. 5. Campbell College 

In its first j-ear the new administration has endeavored to uphold the 
traditions and standards of Campbell College, and at the same time has 
been laying plans for a more glorious future. The responses coming 
from alumni and friends everywhere indicate a loyal devotion to the 
institution and a deep seated conviction that it holds a permanent place 
in our denominational program. 

Outstanding events and developments during the present Convention 
year are : 

1. Payment of the last thousand dollar note due the Jefferson Stand- 
ard Life Insurance Company, leaving the college free of debt. 

2. Loss by death of our legal adviser and faithful trustee, John C. 
Clifford, of Dunn. 

3. Selection of the following new members of the faculty to replace 
resignations : Alexander Burkot, graduate of Dickinson College and 
graduate student of the University of Berlin and the University of North 
Carolina, teacher of Modern Languages ; C. P. Stasavich, graduate of 
Lenoir-Rhyne College, teacher of high school mathematics and assistant 
coach ; Miss Mildred Moore, B.M., Meredith College, instructor in 
piano; Miss Rilda Mae Hill, B.S., Woman's College of the University 
of North Carolina, instructor in shorthand and typewriting. 

4. Introduction of a new pupil guidance program. A new cumulative 
record card designed by the American Council on Education forms the 
basis for giving the faculty advisers detailed information concerning 
every pupil. 

5. Formulation of plan for launching a campaign to secure a sub- 
stantial endowment for the college. 

We are grateful for the cooperation of Secretary M. A. Huggins 
and other denominational leaders, who have rendered invaluable aid in 
establishing the new administration. 



Annual of Session 1935 



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102 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

125. C. OUR DEBT 

We are grateful that we can report a substantial reduction in our 
educational debts. It is hoped that during the calendar year 1935 we 
shall reduce our bonded and note indebtedness by at least $40,000. In 
addition we are reducing the indebtedness to Campbell and Wingate. We 
do not give here a full report as the audited account of the Debt Service 
Fund for the calendar year 1935 will appear in the Minutes of this Con- 
vention when they are printed. 

We are happy to report that we have been able to set aside month by 
month into the sinking funds the amount required by the agreements 
entered into two years ago when our big bond and note indebtedness was 
refinanced. In a word, we are paying debts and at the same time we are 
maintaining the faith and credit of the Baptist State Convention. The 
load is heavy but our people are carrying it with a smile. One of these 
days we are going to rise up in our strength and get these debts behind 
us. We do not propose to forget our obligations to our creditors. 
Neither do we propose in the meantime to forget our obligations to 
others who are in need of support, hospital care, or those people in our 
state and elsewhere who need the gospel preached to them, and who 
cannot wait — must not wait — until our debts are paid in order to hear it. 



Ill 

Department of Benevolences 

126. A. THE RELIEF AND ANNUITY BOARD 

Summary of Statistics for North Carolina 

Aided during the past year, ministers, 74; 

widows, 54— Total 128 

Dropped for cause during the year none 

Declined for cause 3 

Died — men, 1; widows, 1 — Total 2 

On roll, October 1, 1935 — ministers, 72; 

widows, 55 — Total 127 

On waiting list 3 

Receipts of Board from North Carolina 

for Relief Fund $5,128.34 

Dispensed in the State 6,881.64 

Members of the Annuity Fund— men 26 ; 

widows, 20 — Total 46 

Number of Foreign Missionaries aided by 

the Board in N. C 2 

For lack of space, this report must be confined mainly to the work in 
North Carolina. However, attention should be called to two or three 



Annual of Session 1935 103 

matters about our general work in which the Baptists of the South have 
a common interest. 

You will be gratified, I am sure, to know that the plan for cooperation 
with the Foreign Mission Board in the relief of its disabled missionaries 
is now in operation, and that 413 of these are now participants in its 
Annuity funds, and 22 are on its pension roll, of whom two are now 
living among us. A similar arrangement also has been perfected with 
our orphanages for relief of their retired workers, but this is not ex- 
pected to become effective until next January. 

Space does not allow an explanation of the several Annuity plans now 
being operated by the Board, whereby 46 men and women are already 
receiving annuities, having passed the required age of 68, or because of 
physical infirmities beforehand — the men receiving $500.00 and widows 
$300.00 annually. It is earnestly hoped that not only our ministers, but 
our churches as a body will acquaint themselves with the several annuity 
plans and cooperate with pastors by enabling the latter to participate in 
such plans. 

You will observe that it is not yet certain whether our old ministers 
or their widows can participate in the advantages offered by the Federal 
government's Old Age Security Plan. As finally passed by the House, 
this measure was so amended as to exclude all salaried officials of 
churches ; so it may turn out that several of a church's members may 
participate in the benefits offered by the government, while its aged and 
helpless minister is excluded. But, in any case, this Federal plan will 
not become fully effective for several years. Meanwhile, let it be remem- 
bered that the government is already providing for its officials and many 
of its workers when they become disqualified for self support by age or 
infirmity. Can the churches of our Lord afford to do less for their 
helpless servants? And does not a denomination in ordaining a man 
assume moral responsibility for his support, not only during his period 
of service, but after age or infirmity has rendered him helpless? 

It may be added that Secretary Watts is trying to perfect a plan 
which will offer better advantages than those promised by the govern- 
ment. 

The Board's only available funds for Relief allocations come from its 
3%% of the churches' contributions through the Cooperative Program, 
together with income from a small Reserve Relief Fund which it is 
trying to build up. All such funds are applied directly to relief, without 
any reduction for operating expenses. Exceptions to this statement are 
that Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, South Carolina and Vir- 
ginia receive incomes from special trust funds held by these several 
states. 

As to our State, the figures speak for themselves, and they do not 
tell a pleasant story ; for while we have eighteen more on the list of 



104 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

beneficiaries than last year, this has been made possible by reducing exist- 
ing allocations, so that the average monthly allocations of $6.65 two 
years ago have now fallen to $4.75 for men and a few cents less for 
women. 

The figures also tell us that in spite of improved conditions, North 
Carolina contributed to the Board last year nearly one-fourth less than 
the year before, and only four-fifths as much as it received from the 
Board. Moreover, only four of our sister Southern States contributed 
less in proportion than we did. 

The following comparisons only darken the picture. According to 
statistics gathered by Secretary Watts, the Southern Methodists, with 
only 8,000 active ministers, have 3,422 on their relief rolls, while South- 
ern Baptists, with 22,800 ministers, have less than 1,500. Northern 
Baptists, with half as many ministers as have Southern Baptists, are 
paying relief money to 600 more than we are; and Southern Presby- 
terians, with one-tenth as many ministers as we have, are paying relief 
benefits to one-third more veterans than we are. These comparisons are 
odious — so odious that it pains me to present them. But my hope is that 
they may shame us all into some worthy action. 

As it seems to me, our first concern should be the creation of a 
denominational conscience on this subject, as we have been doing with 
gratifying success on missions, orphanage work, etc.; and for this service 
we must depend largely on our pastors, as we have depended heretofore 
in other matters. It will seem to them at first a delicate matter. So it 
seemed to Paul at first ; but he soon saw his error, apologized for it, and 
then strongly urged this duty upon the churches at Corinth and Galatia 
and on his assistant, Timothy. 

So, will our pastors pardon a few suggestions from one no longer 
able to share the burden with them? 

It might be well for them first to quicken their own consciences by 
a prayerful study of I Cor. 8:8-14, Gal. 6:6, and I Tim. 5:18; and then 
ponder the wide implications and applications of Deut. 12:19: "See that 
thou forget not the Levite as long as thou livest on earth." 

Then give the subject a good hour in your annual conferences, and 
that not once, nor twice, but until the denomination begins to awaken. 

Take measures to inform your people on this subject, about which 
they now know next to nothing, and, therefore, can be expected to do 
nothing. As to means of disseminating this information, seek to put 
into their hands the varied literature which the Board has on hand and 
will send freely on application. This literature includes short dramas, 
which many churches and Sunday schools, led by their women, would 
doubtless help to put on. 

Consider setting aside at least one Sunday morning service a year for 
this subject in all our churches. 



Annual of Session 1935 105 

Stress especially the Board's Service Annuity Plan, and seek to induce 
your churches to cooperate in enabling their pastors to participate in it. 
The present percentage in annual contributions would not raise a decent 
support in a hundred years. 

Finally, study the plan in operation among the Episcopalians, whereby 
each church voluntarily sets aside one-sixth of its pastor's salary annually 
for an old age pension fund. 

Your combined wisdom, I am sure, will enable you not only to decide 
on the wisdom of these suggestions, but to suggest other lines perhaps ; 
and you may be sure Secretary Watts will gratefully welcome your 
suggestions. 

127. B. REPORT OF BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 

The year 1935 brings the Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina to 
the close of a fifty years' experience in orphanage work. These checkered 
years have met with temporary defeats as well as gratifying victories. 

By adopting and pursuing a wise financial policy you have ac- 
cumulated assets valued at approximately $1,500,000.00. All this has been 
done without asking the Baptist State Convention for a dollar. At the 
present time your orphanage is not paying one cent of interest, and ex- 
cept for current bills, all of which we hope to meet with your Thanks- 
giving offering, the Home is free from debt. The greater part of our 
endowment fund and practically all of our buildings have come as direct 
gifts from individuals. Many of those generous-hearted. Godly men 
and women who made it possible for orphan children to have homes 
are now living in their mansions eternal in the heavens. The once-a- 
month collections, the gifts of produce, and the Thanksgiving offerings 
have made it possible for you to touch human life at its greatest need. 
You can ill afford to abandon or invade a policy that has worked so well. 
As a memorial to those who laid this foundation, and on behalf of the 
children who are still looking to you for hope, we ask that you reaffirm 
your faith in this financial policy, and pledge your all to make it even 
more inclusive and effective than it has been in the past. 

At the present time there are many sources of income for our Current 
Fund. Individual gifts continue to come from many who love the chil- 
dren and desire to support them. Some send liberal gifts and ask that 
their names be kept secret and the gift published as merely from "a 
friend." 

The interest from the Endowment Fund is used to help support the 
children and pay current fund expenses. This income is a big help in 
our work. In 1934 this amounted to $28,928.69. We cannot expect as 
good a yield in the future. Interest rates on bonds and other securities 



106 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

in endowment funds are lower than they have been. The income from 
this source will necessarily be less. 

Undesignated gifts in wills are a great help. From time to time 
friends remember the Orphanage in their wills, and request the money 
be used as the trustees think best. In this way we may have a fund for 
repair work and for meeting other pressing needs. Profits from Charity 
and Children and Job Work are used in the current fund. The income 
from "Gifts in Kind" is a great blessing. This refers to gifts other 
than cash, such as produce, clothing, grain and groceries. In 1934 gifts 
of this kind amounted to about $8,000.00. 

Each year we receive a check from the Duke Endowment. This gift 
for 1934 amounted to $13,483.20. We are grateful for this aid. It 
always comes at the time when it is most needed. 

Our greatest source of income for current funds is from the Baptist 
churches and Sunday schools of North Carolina. In 1934, out of the 
total receipts from all sources amounting to $176,659.12, we received 
from churches and Sunday schools $112,172.26. This came from once a 
month offerings by the Sunday schools and from the Thanksgiving Day 
offerings by the churches and Sunday schools. 

For the first time in the history of the orphanage, this year our 
farms have produced enough feed and grain for our poultry, hogs, dairy 
herd and other livestock. 

It has been necessary to draw heavily on the treasury recently in 
order that we might paint and repair buildings, and make other necessary 
improvements. According to the auditor's report the expense bill in 
caring for your large family averages around four hundred dollars a day. 

The orphanage is not rich. It will never be rich except in the happy 
experience and consciousness of knowing that within its folds there are 
hundreds of children who have been rescued from the barren peaks and 
shifting sands of want. 

The health of the children has been unusually good, but the Father 
has seen fit to take three of our faithful workers. Mrs. Annie Wart- 
man, who for man}' years served as kitchen matron at the Hutchinson 
Building, went to her reward May 7, 1935. On March 15th, Mr. Mack 
Edinger, faithful carpenter at Mills Home, laid down his tools and went 
to be with the carpenter of Nazareth. Archibald Johnson, who for 39 
years had so ably edited Charity and Children, on the evening of De- 
cember 29th fell on sleep. For many years Mr. Johnson had been one 
of the most prominent members of the Baptist State Convention. He 
had courage enough to champion any righteous cause and had religion 
enough to change his position if he found he was in the wrong. No 
greater friend of the orphan child has lived in any generation. 

G. Stanley Hall has well said, "To know, love and serve childhood is 
the most satisfying and soul filling of all human activities. It gives our 



Annual of Session 1935 107 

lives a rounded out completeness found in no other service. No other 
object is so worthy of service and sacrifice, and the fullness of the meas- 
ure in which this is rendered is the very best test of a nation, of a race, 
or of a civilization." 

As we reflect upon the achievements of the past, it is a temptation to 
linger with those who have made it possible for us to come to this hour. 
It is an even greater temptation to sit down and enjoy things as they 
are, but yonder is a broken home, a woman and children, victims of 
circumstances over which they have no control. More than four hun- 
dred children are knocking at your door. Shall we respond to their call ? 
Yes, every fiber of our religious nature impels us to march straight to 
the child who has been swept from his moorings and robbed of his birth- 
right. It was such a spirit as this that prompted Henry Van Dyke to 
write : 

"March swiftly on. Yet err not from the way 
Where all the nobly wise of old have trod, — 
The path of faith, made by the sons of God. 

"Follow the marks they have set beside 
The narrow cloud-swept track, to be thy guide ; 
Follow, and honor what the past has gained, 
And forward still, that more may be attained. 

"Something to learn, and something to forget; 
Hold fast the good, and seek the better yet ; 
Press on, and prove the pilgrim — hope of youth." 

128. C. REPORT OF NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST 

HOSPITAL, INC. 

Smith Hagaman, Superintendent 

Grateful for divine blessing, we come to the close of another year of 
greatly enlarged service of our Baptist Hospital at Winston-Salem. 

During the year, a number of needed improvements have been made 
to our equipment, including the installation of a new and up-to-date 
lighting system for the operating rooms, a new and improved dishwasher, 
metal spring chairs for the patients' rooms, and every patient and nurse 
now lies on a rebuilt spring mattress. The cost of these permanent im- 
provements was $3,148.30. 

On Friday, October 11, 1935, we admitted for treatment the 30,000th 
patient. We shall have this year about 3,600 patients ; of this number, 
about one-half will be service, or free patients. 

A comparative statement of the last three years will give a fair 
idea of the increasing service being rendered by the Hospital. 

Average number of patients per day for 

1933 59.8 

1934 72 

1935 87 

and the average is now running above 90. 



108 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

There has also been a gratifying increase in Mother's Day offerings: 

1933 $11,365.12 

1934 13,972.30 

1935 16,107.09 

Also, a relative increase in the number of churches contributing on 
Mother's Day is noted : 

1933 1,070 

1934 1,327 

1935 1,706 

We have received from Duke Endowment for last year (1934) 
$9,274.00. The four per cent received from the Cooperative Program is 
not sufficient to meet the installments on the Construction Bonds of the 
Hospital. We are, therefore, dependent upon other sources for current 
expenses. 

One of the greatest needs of the Hospital at this time is more room. 
We trust that this may, in some way, soon be provided. 

We earnestly insist that every Pastor, Sunday School Superintendent, 
and Church Leader shall lay this work on the hearts of our people. 

Under our present arrangements, Mother's Day — the second Sunday 
in May — is the only day in the whole year given to the cause of the sick 
and suffering of our state. We are praying you that it shall be seriously 
observed in every church and Sunday school. 

We trust that the W. M. U.'s, the Y. W. A.'s, and other church 
organizations of our women, who are so nobly aiding us by furnishing 
large quantities of linen, will increase these in proportion to the rapidly 
increasing number of patients. 

IV 
Cooperative Program 

129. A. DIVISION OF RECEIPTS 

As stated elsewhere in this report, the undesignated money of the 
Cooperative Program is divided sixty per cent for state objects and forty 
per cent for southwide objects. We have been earnestly hoping that our 
income would increase to the point whereby we could divide fifty-fifty. 
It would rejoice all of us to make this division for 1936, but with the 
present outlook, and in view of the commitments we have made, it would 
not be the part of wisdom to make that division at this time. Moreover, 
we are to remember that practically every object in the Cooperative 
Program, save the Debt Service Fund, receives during the year sub- 
stantial designations. For example, in 1934 the several objects received 
special designations as follows : 



Annual of Session 1935 109 

State Missions $18,502 

Foreign Missions 50,836 

Home Missions 15,071 

Education Aid 1,300 

Ministers' Relief 2,054 

Hospital 17,175.11 

These designated amounts were sent to these several objects in addi- 
tion to their per cent of the undesignated money. 

In this connection, however, it is gratifying to report that the Co- 
operative Program as a plan by which and through which we may work 
to the best advantage of all our objects grows in favor. Many of our 
smaller churches are just now learning how to send money through the 
Cooperative Program. It will be noted that we use the word "through" 
instead of "to." We believe this plan will grow in favor with our people 
as our pastors and church leaders take a little more time to explain it 
definitely to them. We make our offerings not "to" the Cooperative 
Program but "through" it. It is merely a channel through which our 
beneficence flows. We need to think of folks and their mental, spiritual 
and physical needs. It is to them that our beneficence flows through the 
Cooperative Program. 

130. B. PROMOTION PLANS 

We are now in the midst of the most intensive effort we have made 
in years to promote the every member enrollment and canvass of our 
membership. From the mountains to the sea for the past few months 
we have sounded out the challenge, "A Stewardship Revival in Every 
Baptist Church in North Carolina." We have hoped that with all our 
efforts there would be at least one thousand of these revivals held. The 
blue print of the plan contemplates the assembling of the church together 
for a week of study and meditation on the great themes of discipleship, 
stewardship and missions. We believe now that these revivals will be 
held in more than a thousand churches. We have kept away from the 
use of the term, "Mission Schools," inasmuch as that term fails to 
convey the complete idea which we have had in mind. W'e cannot get 
our people to go very far in the support of missions and other objects 
until they have made a committal of themselves as disciples and stew- 
ards. Moreover, we have urged the adoption not only of a worthy budget 
for the Cooperative Program objects but also an enlarged program for 
the local church. We do this because it is our conviction that at the 
present time fully eighty per cent of our pastors, particularly those in 
the rural churches, are not receiving an income sufficient to keep them 
fit for Kingdom service. 

We record our gratitude because of the growing sense of stewardship 
in an enlarging number of church members. Many of our churches are 



110 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

pressing the "Prove me tithing campaign" as they have never done be- 
fore. We are certain that the number of tithers in our churches is 
increasing with gratifying rapidity. 

We repeat here what is stated elsewhere in this report, viz, that the 
Board in its June meeting provided for an increased staff during the last 
months of the year in order to promote these Stewardship Revivals. 
Perry Morgan has virtually dropped the Sunday school work for the 
last four months of the year, and has devoted his time to the promotion 
of the work in about twenty associations. General Missionary M. O. 
Alexander has been giving his full time to about twenty-two associations. 
Charles H. Dickey, who came with the Board September 1, has been 
giving about half his time to similar activities, while the other half has 
been devoted to general publicity. J. C. Pipes gave the greater part of 
the month of August in visiting associations and in making preparation 
for these Revivals in the western part of the state. Since September 1 
he has given his full time to a group of about fourteen associations in 
the Asheville area. To these servants who have given so largely of 
their thought and effort we record our deep and abiding appreciation. 
In our opinion the every member enrollment and canvass promises to 
be the most thorough and successful in our history, certainly since the 
close of the Seventy-Five Million Campaign. This means an enlarged 
budget for the local church, and along with it a greatly increased budget 
for missions. It is believed that fully fifteen hundred churches have 
accepted or adopted for themselves worthy objectives for 1936 ; and it 
is heartening to know that on the whole these objectives are some twenty 
per cent higher than the amounts actually being given in 1935. 

In preparation for the work the General Secretary prepared a book- 
let which is called "Baptist Working Toward a World Program." It is 
an extension of the little book, "Baptist at Work," which we used in 
1934. Up to this time we have printed 20,000 of these booklets; and in 
addition to this we supplied Mississippi with 5,000 copies. 

We call attention also to the fact that we are using an enrollment 
card which challenges the church member not only to set for himself a 
personal program of giving but also a program of service. It is inter- 
esting to note that the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist 
Convention has printed 100,000 of the cards we are using for distribution 
among the several states in the Southern Convention. 

We call attention again to the fact that the Cooperative Program, 
broadly conceived, contemplates not only the giving of undesignated 
money, but provides also for special days on which offerings are made 
for special objects. It is true that money given on these special days 
goes to the object specified, but at the same time these special days are 
observed as a part of our general Cooperative Program plan. These 
special days follow : 



Annual of Session 1935 I'll 

Home and Foreign Missions — Some Sunday in March. 

Hospital — Mother's Day. 

Christian Education — Some Sunday in June. 

Old Ministers' Relief — Some Sunday in August. 

State Missions — Last Sunday in October. 

Orphanage — Thanksgiving. 

These days should be observed in all our churches, and the appeal 
should be made (1) to those who have made a subscription and who are 
contributing systematically. These should not be pressed, but merely 
asked to make an offering, and "over and above," if their hearts prompt 
them. But what of the sixty to eighty per cent of our members who 
make no pledge at all and contribute with no regularity? Even in our 
most progressive churches there is a group of twenty-five to fifty per 
cent of the membership who make no subscriptions. How are they to 
be reached for our Mission objects unless these Special Days are ob- 
served? It is, therefore, suggested that after the Canvass or Enrollment 
is completed a list of those members who will not make a subscription 
be made. We suggest the formation in each church of a Missions or 
Cooperative Program Committee composed of the following: Chairman, 
the Superintendent of the Sunday school ; other members to include the 
chairman of the board of deacons, the president of the W. M. S., the 
president of the B. T. U., and the presidents and teachers of the larger 
classes in the Sunday school. The names of those who made no 
subscription, or who contribute irregularly, should be divided among the 
members of this committee. Then when the special days come each 
member who has not subscribed should be challenged to do something for 
each of these objects. 

The last Convention elected a special Promotion Committee composed 
of one member from each association. This committee, with about fifty 
associations represented and about seventy-five in attendance, met in 
July at Thomasville as guests of the Mills Home. Three sessions of 
several hours each were held. In these meetings we discussed fully and 
frankly some of the most vital problems that face us, particularly with 
reference to the enlistment of all of our people in all our program. 
We are happy to record that plans were inaugurated which are bringing 
most gratifying results. 

We urge the continuance of this large committee, and we would urge 
also the hearty cooperation of the pastors and church leaders in the 
associations to the end that we may move forward all together in an 
all embracing, all inclusive program. 



112 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

V 

131. REPORT OF THE BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

(Owned jointly by the Baptist Sunday School Board, Nashville, Tenn., 

and the North Carolina Baptist State Convention) 

Mrs. Roger Marshall, Manager 

Net sales for the year ending December 31, 1934 amounted to $37,- 
286.33, with a net profit of $4,001.45. 

The amount paid out to the two boards owning the Book Store in 
dividends during the year amounted to $2,898.63, one-half of this amount 
having been paid to each board. 

It may be seen from this that the Book Store is operating on a paying 
basis. The total net worth at December 31, 1934 was $14,096.65, with 
no unpaid bills. During the ten years under the present partnership a 
total profit of $24,487.38 has been paid out to both boards. One-half of 
this amount, $12,243.69, has been paid the North Carolina Board, which 
means that the Book Store is a distinct asset and a denominational 
investment. 

The Book Store handles all supplies for every department of the 
church, as well as a complete line of general and religious books and 
Bibles. By means of the catalogues at our disposal, we can secure any 
book in print. 

It is our desire to serve North Carolina Baptists promptly and effi- 
ciently, and we covet your continued patronage and support. 

Write for free catalogues. 



VI 

132. REPORT OF THE NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

The Commission takes pleasure in reporting the publication in May 
1935 of the first volume of the History of Wake Forest College by G. W. 
Paschal. This covers the period 1834-1865. It is a volume of nearly 
700 pages, documented and indexed, and constitutes the definitive history 
of the institution for this interesting period. It may be ordered from 
E. B. Earnshaw, Bursar, Wake Forest, N. C. ; $2.00 for the regular 
edition, $5.00 for de luxe edition. Dr. Paschal is now engaged in writing 
the second volume, which will bring the history of the College iip to date. 

We would also urge our Baptist people generally to secure and read 
Dr. Paschal's History of North Carolina Baptists, which may be ordered 



Annual of Session 1935 113 

from M. A. Huggins, General Secretary and Treasurer of the Baptist 
State Convention, for $1.00 a volume and postage, about twenty cents. 

Important additions continue to be made to the "North Carolina Bap- 
tist Historical Collection" in the library of Wake Forest College. Dur- 
ing the past year the following valuable collections have been added by 
gift : From J. T. Riddick, Durham, N. C, 504 books and pamphlets ; 
from Mrs. W. C. Tyree, Oxford, N. C, her late husband's library of 
more than 600 volumes; from Dr. Arch C. Cree, Salisbury, N. C, 111 
volumes. The donors are due the thanks of the Commission and the 
Convention. 

Your Commission would again urge upon the churches and their clerks 
and pastors the importance of collecting and depositing their church 
record books in the shelves and cabinets of the Collection in the library 
of Wake Forest College. This provides safety from fire and vermin, and 
insures their preservation. Here they can be consulted at any time by 
any who may be interested. In our Collection are the record books of 
about one hundred of our churches, some of them dating from 1772. The 
Baptist churches of our sister state of Virginia have done much better ; 
more than 500 of them have deposited their church record books in the 
library of Richmond College. 

We should like also to urge any who may have them to donate to the 
Collection any old documents, letters, manuscripts and papers, Minutes 
of Association and Convention, books on church history, or other matters 
of denominational interest. They may send them by express, collect, to 
the Wake Forest College Library. 



VII 

133. REPORT OF NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST FOUNDATION 
YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 28, 1935 

Theodore S. Johnson, Secretary 

At the end of the fiscal year ending October 28, 1935 the North Car- 
olina Baptist Foundation was administering trusts as enumerated below 
in the aggregate amount of $134,615.71, as compared with the total value 
at the end of the year 1934 of $133,906.96 and $134,692.32 for the year 
ending October 31, 1933. The slight gain in the past year is due to 
changes in value brought about by exchange of securities. 

The summarized assets are as follows : 

Real Estate $ 37,611.86 

Meredith College 6% Refunding Bonds 5,095.00 

Baptist State Convention 6% Bonds 9,950.00 

Deed of Trust Notes 49,310.91 



114 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Stocks $ 23,448.00 

Federal Home and Farm Bonds 4,844.93 

Other Bonds 1,847.80 

Cash Principal on Hand 281.38 

Cash Income on Hand 2,225.83 



Total $134,615.71 

The following trusts have been administered : 

Donor Designation 

W. P. Carter Undesignated 

Aged Minister's Ministerial 

Relief Fund Relief 

Noah Biggs Mission Work 

Noah Biggs Church Edifice 

Noah Biggs Ministers Relief 

Noah Biggs Ministerial 

Education 

D. P. Bridges State Missions 

Anonymous Mills Home 

W. L. Carter Mills Home 

W. L. Carter Baptist Hospital 

Susan A. Hurdle tills Home 

Gaston Co. Assoc Boiling Springs 

Junior College 

G. H. Church "" fills Home and 

Foreign Missions 

Ida Y. Rogers Mills Home 

P. D. Camp Ministers' Relief 

and Education 

Y. M. Whisenhunt State Missions 

Nannie L. McLean Ministers' Relief 

D. F. Bridges Wake Forest College 

Foreign Mission Board 

of S'outhern Baptist 

Convention 
Meredith College 

Total 



Value 


Net Income 


900.00 


$ 0.00 


39,680.03 
3,110.44 

5,000.00 
2,800.00 


1,210.00 

70.00 

180.00 

125.00 


2,500.00 
10,000.00 
1,139.08 
1,800.00 
1,800.00 
10,852.40 


190.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


700.00 


27.00 


8,592.26 
24,684.29 


225.00 
1,180.00 


15,000.00 
100.00 
450.00 


1,065.00 

0.00 

24.00 



1,000.00 



0.00 



$132,108.50 $4,296.00 

Of the total assets of the Foundation $27,591.40 is either not pro- 
ducing income because of the present nature of the property or because 
of prior life interests. Of the remainder, income totaling $4,296.00 was 
received from property valued at $104,517.10 or at a rate of 4.11%. 

The expenses of administration were as follows : 

Insurance Premiums $ 74.60 

Administrative Expense 32.90 

Repairs 36.20 

Commission 266.99 

The Wachovia Bank and Trust Company for acting as Fiscal Agent 
for the Foundation received a commission of 5% on the income from the 
various trusts or as shown above $266.99. This is 6.2% of the net in- 
come distributed to beneficiaries. 

There is now on hand Cash Principal not invested of $281.38 and 
Cash Income Balance, as yet undistributed, of $2,225.83. 

One trust fund in the total amount of $1,689.08, the proceeds of which 
are designated for the Mills Home, has been reduced to $1,139.08 by a 



Annual of Session 1935 115 

withdrawal by the donor for his own use of $550.00. The income from 
this fund was also paid to the donor at his request. 

One new trust fund has been set up under the will of D. P. Bridges 
in the amount of $1,000.00 the income of which is to be divided equally 
between Wake Forest College, the Foreign Alission Board of the South- 
ern Baptist Convention and Meredith College. 

Certain questions have arisen in connection with the estate of T. F. 
Pettus, the estate of T. B. Parker and certain loans from the trust funds, 
involving an interpretation of the powers of the Directors under their 
Charter. In order to clarify this matter the Directors have adopted a 
resolution asking that action be taken by the State Convention, author- 
izing amendments to the charter of the Foundation. The adoption of 
these resolutions by the Convention is recommended. 

The charter provides that the annual meeting of the Directors shall 
be held one week prior to the Annual State Convention. This makes 
difficult the preparation of the report to the Convention and its inclusion 
in the printed report of the General Secretary. It is requested that the 
Convention take action authorizing the holding of the annual meeting on 
the Tuesday following the second Monday in October in each year. 

The Board of Directors now consists of Dr. Z. M. Caveness, Ral- 
eigh, Chairman ; Dr. Joseph L. Peacock, Tarboro ; J. D. Wilkins, Greens- 
boro ; Rev. Herman T. Stevens, Asheboro ; Theodore S. Johnson, Ral- 
eigh, Secretary. 

Rev. Herman T. Stevens has tendered his resignation, because of 
changing his residence to Virginia, and it will be necessary for the Con- 
vention to elect some one to fill out his unexpired term. 

At the last State Convention reports were made concerning the estab- 
lishment of a Board to care for the needy, aged and infirm. It is the 
opinion of the Directors of the Foundation, that the powers of the 
Foundation are adequate for the purposes and objectives set forth in 
the report on this subject and we believe the Foundation can effectively 
administer any funds set aside for this purpose. 

We wish to reiterate that, with the improvement which has already 
taken place in financial conditions, the Convention through its officers, 
committees and executive staff should make every effort to bring the 
Foundation, its purposes and methods earnestly before the Baptists of 
the state to the end that they may utilize its facilities for gifts, bequests, 
annuities, and other forms of endowment, for any of the purposes for 
which the Convention has established the Foundation. 



116 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

VIII 

134. RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. That the Division of Undesignated Funds as between State and 
Southwide objects be fixed at 60-40 for the fiscal year 1936, and that 
the General Board be asked to divide the sixty cents for state purposes 
so as to properly safeguard our debt funding commitments and at the 
same time conserve and promote in the best manner possible all our work. 

2. That the Convention authorize the continuance of the work with 
our Negro brethren begun so auspiciously this year. 

3. That the Convention authorize the continuance of the plan of 
pastors' conferences and schools, and that the Board be authorized to 
make as liberal financial provisions for this work as possible ; further- 
more, that the Convention urge the pastors to take advantage of the 
opportunity offered in these conferences and schools. 

4. That the Board be authorized and instructed to continue the work 
among the Indians in Robeson and Swain counties until such time as 
the Home Mission Board finds it possible to resume the work in whole 
or in part. 

5. That the work at Oteen be continued and if at all possible en- 
larged, and that the other states in the south having patients in the hos- 
pital be urged to share in the work as they are doing during the present 
year. 

6. That the Board be authorized at the earliest possible moment to 
employ one or more additional general missionaries, and that these mis- 
sionaries give their time to revivals in the churches desiring their services, 
to the promotion of the Every Member Enrollment in the fall season, 
and in general to assist the General Secretary in every way possible to 
promote every interest of our cooperative work. 

7. That the Convention authorize and instruct the Board concerning 
the proper steps to take in aiding Forest Avenue (Greensboro) and 
Boone churches to complete their building program. 

8. That the Convention authorize the General Board to take such 
steps as seem necessary, in conjunction with the management of the Bib- 
lical Recorder, to substantially increase the subscription list of the 
Recorder during 1936. 

9. That we set our goal for 1936 at $600,000, this amount to include 
all Designated and Undesignated funds and all funds for the North Car- 
olina Baptist Orphanage, and that we ask the cooperation of all the 
churches, all the associations, and the Woman's Missionary Union as 
we attempt to reach this objective. 



Annual of Session 1935 117 

135. REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

In January 1936, the Woman's Missionary Union Auxiliary to this 
Convention, will complete a half century of service. It seems fitting at 
this time that we give a summary of some of the things that we have 
accomplished in this period. 

From ten organizations we have grown to 2,913 including 1,819 young 
people's societies. Our membership is over fifty thousand and yet we 
have only one-third of the women and young people in our churches 
enlisted. 

Our gifts have increased from less than one thousand dollars a year 
to nearly two hundred thousand, and the total amount given by the Wom- 
an's Missionary Union during this century to missions and benevolence is 
nearly five million dollars. 

Our organization is most complete, consisting of an Executive Com- 
mittee with six officers, and sixteen members living in or near Raleigh — 
five Divisional organizations, and organized work in sixty of our Asso- 
ciations. In fifty-eight of these Associations we have young people's 
organizations working most effectively. 

In the Woman's Missionary Union Auxiliary to our Southern Baptist 
Convention our North Carolina Woman's Missionary Union stands third 
in gifts — our young people's societies second, in number of organizations 
third and in members fourth. 

A most important factor in the development of our work has been 
the special offerings of the Woman's Missionary Union. There are five 
of these — the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering for Foreign Missions, 
preceded by a week of prayer early in December ; the Annie W. Arm- 
strong Offering for Home Missions in March also preceded by a Week 
of Prayer; and an offering in August each year for our Woman's Mis- 
sionary Union Training School in Louisville, Kentucky, and for the 
Margaret Educational Fund for the education of the children of our 
missionaries. In September each year we make a special offering for our 
State Mission work. This offering this year amounted to $5,904.80 and 
will not be completed until the present quarter closes. We observe not a 
week of prayer in connection with this offering but a day of prayer. 
In addition to these offerings which are observed by our Southern Union, 
North Carolina has a special offering of its own — the Heck Memorial 
Offering in June each year in memory of Miss Fannie E. S. Heck, for 
twenty-nine years the President of our Union. This offering is ap- 
propriated by the Annual Meeting each year to meet some special need 
of our mission work. 

Our plan of work is regular and sytematic gifts to the Cooperative 
Program, and special offerings as an expression of love and willingness 
to sacrifice for the work of the Kingdom. 



118 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

The aim of the Union has not changed through the years ; as stated 
by our President in the very beginning of our work it is, "to stimulate 
the missionary spirit and the grace of giving among the women and 
children of our churches and of aiding in the collection of funds for 
missionary purposes." How well we have succeeded is told by the pres- 
ent status of the work. 

We have built our organization on Prayer, in the life of the individual 
and in the society ; on Bible study realizing the need of our knowledge 
of God's will for our lives, and in our organizations ; on Mission study 
that we may be informed as to the progress of the kingdom in the 
world ; on Personal Service, remembering the example of Him whom 
we serve ; and on Stewardship not only of gifts, talents and time, but a 
stewardship that recognizes God's ownership and that the words of Paul 
"Ye are not your own for ye are bought with a price" should be a vital 
factor in our lives. 

The future lies ahead. We face it without fear, believing the develop- 
ment of young people in our missionary societies will bring to us a 
trained leadership that will meet the problems and opportunities which 
will come in such a way as to bring far greater results than those of the 
first half century. 

Ours has been the joy of service, the results have been far greater 
than we had faith to expect fifty years ago. 

With hearts full of gratitude to God for His many blessings, His 
guidance through the years, the promise of His abiding presence, and 
with heartfelt appreciation to all who have shared in the labors of our 
Woman's Missionary Union we respectfully submit this report. 

Mrs. Wesley N. Jones, President, 

Mrs. Edna R. Harris, Corresponding Secretary, 

Mrs. W. D. Briggs, Recording Secretary, 

Miss Mary Currin, Secretary of Young People, 

Miss Elsie K. Hunter, Treasurer. 



Annual of Session 1935 119 

(This Annual was delayed because Auditor's Report was not available 
until February 14, 1936.— C.B.D.) 

AUDITOR'S STATEMENT 

Mr. M. A. Huggins, General Secretary, Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
Raleigh, North Carolina 
Dear Sir: 

We have audited the books and records of the Convention for the twelve months ended Decem- 
ber 31, 193S and in the following tabulations we show the Revenue and Expense of the General 
Fund, together with all Cash Receipts and Disbursements for the other funds. 

Exhibit "A" shows the Revenue and Expense of the General Fund, together with the dis- 
tribution of the Revenue after paying expenses chargeable to the undesignated revenue. 

Exhibits "B" to "G", inclusive, show the cash transactions of all other funds for the year, and 
Exhibit "H" is a summary of the net Debt of the Convention on December 31, 1935. 

All Cash Receipts were found to have been promptly deposited in the bank and Disbursements 
were found supported by cancelled checks, invoices, etc., and expenses were properly classified. 
Our examination did not disclose any evidence of irregularities and we believe the funds have 
been carefully and honestly handled and properly accounted for. 

Below is a summary, not audited but prepared from the reports of the various institutions, 
showing the total of all income for Convention objects for the calendar year 1935. 

INCOME FOR ALL CONVENTION OBJECTS FROM THE CHURCHES 
Calendar Year 1935 

Undesignated $ 232,463.96 

Designated for State Missions 28,435.37 

Designated for Education Debt 154.49 

Designated for Ministerial Education 1,355. 87 

Designated for North Carolina Hospital 16,462.71 

Designated for The Orphanage 125 ,461 .69 

W. M. U. Specials 3,830.44 

Designated for Foreign Missions 58,878.92 

Designated for Hundred Thousand Club 7,642.47 

Designated for Home Missions 16, 511. 62 

Designated for Ministers' Relief 2,587.97 

Total $ 493,785.51 



REVENUE AND EXPENSE— GENERAL FUND 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1935 Exhibit "A" 

Revenue: 

From the Churches — Undesignated 2 232,463 96 

W. M. U. Special Funds Sent Directly to Miss Elsie K. Hunter — 

See Contra in Disbursements 3 ,830.44 

Total Revenue $ 236,294.40 

Expenses Chargeable to Undesignated Revenue: 

W. M. U. Department — Payment on Budget $ 7,570.10 

Salaries Paid: 

Salary of the Secretary and Treasurer $ 3,999.95 

Salary of the Bookkeeper 1,620.00 

Salary of the Secretary to the Secretary and 

Treasurer 1,215.00 $ 6,834.95 

Traveling Expenses $ 897.68 

Rent of Offices 732.00 

Printing 401.08 

Postage 714.98 

Telephone and Telegraph 144.24 

Janitor 120.00 

Auditing — General Fund and Foundation 227.50 

Supplies and Repairs 520.65 

Advertising 439.78 

Bonds of Bookkeeper and Treasurer 78.03 

Purchase of Automobile 384.20 

Compensation Insurance 134.72 

Expense of Board Meetings 430. 10 

Floral Designs 7.73 

General Missionary 1,821.71 

Promotion — Literature, Postage and Supplies.. 2,099.95 

Promotion — Salaries 1, 616 . 00 



120 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Promotion — Traveling Expenses $ 1,444.68 

Promotion — Pledge Cards 110.54 

Promotion — Envelopes 411.03 

Promotion — Advertising Special Missionary 

Page 375.50 

Promotion — Subscriptions 294 . 50 

Bank Service Charges and Exchange 165.15 $ 13,561.75 

Total Expenses Chargeable to Undesignated Revenue $ 27,976.80 

Balance in Closed Banks Charged Off 251. 71 

W. M. U. Funds Sent Direct to Miss Elsie K. Hunter — See Contra 

in Receipts 3, 830 . 44 

Grand Total of Expenses $ 32,058.95 

Distributable Balance of Revenue After Expenses Are Paid $ 204,235.45 

Distributions to Other Funds: 

Southwide Objects 40% $ 81,761.94 

State Missions 13% 26,572.62 

Education — Ministerial Aid 1% 2,044.06 

Education— Debt 42% 85,680.63 

North Carolina Hospital 4% 8,176.20 

Total Distribution to Other Funds 100% 55 204,235.45 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— SOUTHWIDE OBJECTS FUND 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1935 Exhibit "B" 

Receipts: 

Share of the General Fund }5 81,761.94 

Funds Designated for Hundred Thousand Club 7,642.47 

Funds Designated for Foreign Missions $ 43,907.53 

Funds Sent Direct for Foreign Missions — See 

Contra in Disbursements 14,971.39 58,878.92 

Funds Designated for Home Missions 16,51 1 .62 

Funds Designated for Ministers' Relief 323.97 

Total Receipts _.g 165,118.92 

Balance from Last Year 53,697.75 

Total to Account for $ 218,816.67 

Disbursements: 

Paid on Undesignated Funds S 87,290.92 

Paid on Designations for Hundred Thousand Club 7,214.22 

Paid on Designations for Foreign Missions 55 43,894.53 

Funds Sent Direct for Foreign Missions — See 

Contra in Receipts 14,971.39 58,865.92 

Paid on Designations for Home Missions 16,346.28 

Paid on Designations for Ministers' Relief 364.60 

Total Disbursements 55 170,081.94 

Balance Due Southwide Objects December 31 , 1935 S 48,734.73 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— STATE MISSIONS FUND 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1935 Exhibit "C" 

Receipts: 

Share of the General Fund 55 26,572.62 

Funds Sent Direct to Oteen — See Contra in Disbursements 544.50 

Designated Funds 19,454.04 

From Sunday School Board 6, 192.65 

From Baptist Foundation 250.00 

Dividend Biblical Recorder 108.00 

Profit Baptist Book Shop 1,738.14 

Rent McCullers Church 12.00 

Sale of Baptist Histories 116.04 

Special Meetings 20.00 

Total Receipts .. $ 55,007.99 

Balance from Last Year 5,447.27 

Total to Account for 55 60,455.26 



Annual of Session 1935 121 



Disbursements: 

Sunday School Department: 

Mr. Perry Morgan $ 2,700.00 

Mr. L. L. Morgan 2,100.00 

Miss Bessie Morgan 1,080.00 $ 5,880.00 



Traveling Expenses 655.80 

Printing 150.17 

Postage 449.83 

Office Rent 192.00 

Incidentals 102 . 46 

Sunday School Convention 100.00 

Total Sunday School Department $ 7,530.26 

Baptist Training Union Department: 
Salaries: 

Miss Winnie Rickett $ 1,620.00 

Miss Mabel Starnes 1,200.00 

Mrs. J. E. Tharrington _ 1,080.00 $ 3,900.00 



Traveling Expenses 484 . 07 

Printing 75.94 

Postage 471.89 

Office Rent 252.00 

Incidentals 52.27 

Total Baptist Training Union Department $ 5,236.17 

Other Disbursements: 

State Convention Minutes and Recording Sec- 
retary 1,321.80 

State Mission Day Program ' 426.99 

Annuities — Spilman, Bridgers & Linkhauer 400.00 

Pastors' School... 1,037.50 

Repairs to Spilman Cottage 128.59 

Regular Missionaries 17, 524. 44 

Indian Missionaries 2.774.85 

Special Missionaries 2,160.48 

Negro Extension Worker 749 . 97 

Salaries and Expenses of Student Workers 1 ,429.28 

Upkeep Student Cottage at N. C. C. W 120.50 

Rural Workers for Western and Eastern North 

Carolina... 1,142.70 

Church Buildings 4,745.28 

Laymens' Meeting 174.35 

Will of O. L. Pittman— Fees 230.45 

Miscellaneous Expenses 13.80 

Total Other Disbursements $ 34,380.98 

Funds Sent Direct to Oteen — See Contra in Receipts 544.50 

Total Disbursements $ 47,691.91 



Balance December 31, 1935 $ 12,763.35 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS- 
EDUCATION— MINISTERIAL AID FUND 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1935 Exhibit "D 1 

Receipts: 

Share of the General Fund $ 2,044.06 

Designated Funds 1, 355. 87 

Total Receipts ? 3,399.93 

Balance from Last Year 732.28 

Total to Account for $ 4,132.21 

Disbursements: 

Paid to Wake Forest College ._.£ 1,800.00 

Paid to Mars Hill College 460.20 

Paid to Wingate College 240.00 

Paid to Campbell College 240.00 

Paid to Boiling Springs College 240.00 

Paid to Chowan College 75 .00 

Total Disbursements S 3 ,055 . 20 



Balance December 31, 1935 $ 1,077.01 



122 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— EDUCATION— DEBT FUND 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1935 Exhibit "E" 

Receipts: 

Share of the General Fund $ 85, 680. 63 

Designated Funds 154.49 

Centennial Campaign Pledges 495 . 16 

Interest on Bonds Owned 780. 16 

Borrowed Money 10 . 000 . 00 

Transfer from General Fund for Borrowed Money Assumed by 

the Debt Service Fund 14,000.00 

Bonds and Accrued Interest — 315,600 Par Value Sold to Sink- 
ing Fund and Cancelled 11,750.96 

Total Receipts $ 122,861.40 

Overdraft from Last Year 39,871.41 

Total to Account for $ 82,989.99 

Disbursements: 

Bonds Purchased £11,050.00 Par Value $ 8,289.50 

Borrowed Money Repaid 13,506.00 

Paid on Wingate College Note 1,000.00 

Paid on Campbell College Note 3,000.00 

Paid on Whitney Refinancing Account 500.00 

Paid on Interest on Institutional Indebtedness 6,248.96 

Paid to Sinking Funds: 

On Interest of Institutional Indebtedness $ 45 , 197.27 

On Future Interest of Institutional Indebt- 
edness 8,140.00 

To Apply on Principal 23,332.73 $ 76,670.00 

Operating Expenses: 

Office Salaries $ 417.50 

Office Rent, Supplies, etc 376.89 

Fidelity Bond Premiums and Income Tax 

on Bonds 247.41 

Auditing Books of Baptist Institutions 300.00 

Auditing Books of Debt Service Fund 62.50 

Depository Fee for Bonds 125.00 

Legal Fees 500.00 

Interest on Borrowed Money 1,479.60 I 3,508.90 

Total Disbursements \ .$ 1 12 , 723 . 36 

Ooerdraft December 31, 1935 $ 29,733.37 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— MINISTERS' RELIEF FUND— SPECIAL 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1935 Exhibit "F" 

Receipts: 

Received from Noah Biggs Fund $ 2,264.00 

Less: Overdraft from Last Year 1,615 .67 

Balance to Account {or $ 648.33 

Disbursements: 

Salary Dr. R. T. Yann 1,800.00 

Overdraft December 31, 1935 $ 1,151.67 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— NORTH CAROLINA HOSPITAL FUND 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1935 Exhibit "G" 

Receipts: 

Share of the General Fund $ 8,176.20 

Designated Funds 6, 863 . 05 

Funds Sent Direct — See Contra in Disbursements 9,599.66 

Total Receipts $ 24,638.91 

Balance from Last Year 483 . 03 

Total to Account for $ 25,121.94 

Disbursements: 

Advertising 62. 10 

Transferred to North Carolina Hospital 14,487.57 

Funds Sent Direct — See Contra in Receipts 9, 599 . 66 

Total Disbursements $ 24,149.33 

Balance December 31, 1935 2 972.61 



Annual of Session 1935 



123 



STATEMENT OF PRESENT FINANCIAL CONDITION 
BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION OF NORTH CAROLINA 

December 31, 1935 Exhibit "H" 

Liabilities: 

Meredith College Bonds g 341,400.00 

Whitney National Bank Notes 407,000.00 

Convention Refunding Bonds 55,450.00 

Note of H. O. Gattis 14,000.00 

Note to Morris Plan Bank of Richmond, Va 2,494.00 

Note to Wingate College 8,000.00 

Note to Campbell College 12,000.00 

Boiling Springs Bonds Outstanding 16.000.00 

Whitney National Bank Refunding Account 3,000.00 

Due to Southwide Objects.. _-_ 48,734.73 

Total Liabilities _? 908,078.73 

Assets — Available: 

Cash in Bank $ 32,662.66 

Cash in Sinking Funds 15, 581. 77 

Bonds Owned 10,150.00 

Total Assets Available . 58,394.43 

Net Amount of Debt December 31, 1935 $ 849,684.30 

Respectively submitted, 

A. T. Allen and Company, 
Certified Public Accountants. 
Raleigh, N. C, February 1, 1936 

BAPTIST BOOK STORE— AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Raleigh, N. C, December 31, 1935 
BALANCE SHEET: 
Assets: 

Cash . $ _ 15.80 

Accounts Receivable 5,699.73 

I n ventory 9, 754. 61 

Furniture and Fixtures — Depreciated Cost 163.18 

Total Assets .$ 15,633.32 

Liabilities None 

Net Worth $ 15,633.32 

PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1935 

Net Sales $ 40,471.51 

Less: Cost of Goods Sold 28,231 .41 

Gross Profit _g 12,240.10 

Operating Expenses 7,904. 59 

Operating Profit 1$ 4,335.51 

Other Income 19.70 

Net Profit for the Year Tg 4,355.21 

AUDITOR'S CERTIFICATE 

We have audited the books and records of the Baptist Book Store, Raleigh, N. C, and sub- 
mitted to the Management a detailed report thereof. 

We have prepared the above condensed statement which, in our opinion, shows the correct 
financial condition of the business on December 31, 1935, together with the result of operations 
for the twelve months ended at that time. 

Respectively submitted, 

A. T. Allen and Company, 
Certified Public Accountants. 
Raleigh, N. C, February 1, 1936 

BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF N. C. INC.— CURRENT FUND INCOME AND EXPENSES 
Year Ending Decmber 31, 1935 

Income: 

From the Churches . 3 115,671.13 

From the Churches — In Kind — Clothing 1,646. 24 

From the Churches — In Kind — Food 8,144.32 

Individuals 3,670.03 

Interest from Endowment Funds 23 ,085 . 10 

Profits from Print Shop, Charity and Children 6,298.97 

Interest on Trusts 1 ,751 . 33 

Dividends and Rent 960.60 

The Duke Endowment 12,287.92 

$ 173,515.64 



124 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Expenses: 

Maintenance Cost: 

At Mills Home $ 125,228.74 

At Kennedy Memorial Home 37, 544 . 04 

Extra Institutional Service 1,875.30 

Mothers Aid . 7,266.46 

Annuities Paid 4,664.78 

$ 176,579.32 

Net Loss for 1935 3,063.68 



BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF N. C. INC.— STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION 
As of December 31, 1935 

ASSETS 
Plants and Equipment $ 598.381.94 

Current Fund — Cash and Accounts Receivable 18,518.57 

Endowment and Reserve Funds — Cash, Mortgages, and Bonds 504,400.80 

Inventories 37, 336. 24 

51,158,637.55 
LIABILITIES 

None 

Net Worth SI, 158, 637. 55 

Increase in Net Worth over December 31, 1934 515,029.06. 

NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST HOSPITAL, INC. 
Operating Statement for Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1935 
Receipts : 

From Churches (Mothers Day) $ 18,122.71 

From Churches (Miscellaneous) 248.42 

From Churches (In Kind) 1,550.00 

From Duke Foundation 9,274.00 

From Other Sources: 

(a) Patients 90,395.06 

(b) Individuals . . 1,491.77 

(c) Counties and Municipalities 673.77 

(d) Investments 100.45 

(e) Out Patients 366.50 

(f) Tel., Tel., Disct., Guest Trays. Sundries 1,192.47 

(g) 4% Cooperative Program 7,666.99 

Total Receipts $ 131,082.14 

Overdraft 3,159.80 

3 134,241.94 

Disbursements: 

Paid Overdraft as of January 1, 1935 3 1,329.31 

Paid Current Expenses for the Year 125, 13 3. 40 

Paid Interest on Bonds 1,779.23 

Paid Note 6,000.00 

$ 134,241.94 

Statement of Financial Condition as of December 31, 1935 
Assets: 

Plant $ 303,824.11 

Equipment. 58,115.23 

Endowment 1,552.50 

Inventories 4,397.82 

Total Assets $ 367,889.66 

Liabilities: 

Bonds Payable --$ 64,000.00 

Street Assessments and Interest 13,639.24 

Accrued Interest on Bonds 1, 778 . 89 

Total Liabilities 79,418.13 

(Net Worth) Offsetting Balance 288,471.53 

$ 367,889.66 



STATISTICS 
AND OTHER DATA 

Compiled by 

Perry Morgan, Statistical Secretary 
Raleigh, N. C. 



[125 



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135 



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137 



c 

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154.22 
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W. F. Lawrence, Union Grove . 

L. D. Welborn, Cycle 

I. G. Reid, Harmony- . 


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E. K. Wooten, Cycle.. 

J. N. Binkley, Harmony 

W. E. Linney, Wilkesboro 


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Sweet Home _ 

Union 

Zion 


13 



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706 . 25 
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Marvin Hedrick, Lexington, Rt. 6 


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W. C. Darnell, Lexington. _ 


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Mission Sunday School 


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en Smith, Lumberton, 
Atkinson, Proctorville 
Warwick, Orrum 

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Graham, Proctorville. 

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195 



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207 



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209 



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211 



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215 



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228 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

STATISTICAL REPORT OF ALL ASSOCIATIONS 



Associations 







a. 


1 

O, 


^ J: 

go 


U 


186 


32 


5,830 


28 


10 


508 


32 


10 


1,069 


164 


43 


3,523 


203 


34 


4,043 


87 


23 


2,420 


190 


23 


3,554 


104 


26 


3,189 


205 


28 


3,591 


182 


32 


5,632 


102 


20 


2,072 


108 


28 


4,698 


648 


57 


12,613 


3S0 


44 


7,943 


234 


37 


6,479 


509 


48 


8,127 


279 


23 


4,202 


319 


34 


9,167 


220 


44 


11,800 


80 


16 


1,496 


287 


39 


6,136 


69 


12 


2,239 


113 


32 


7,830 


263 


41 


5,610 


691 


37 


12,370 


212 


27 


4,336 


324 


36 


4,988 


222 


44 


6,913 


679 


42 


13,408 


246 


26 


6,493 


232 


24 


6,529 


188 


35 


4,878 


747 


41 


15,505 


210 


30 


4,846 


199 


30 


3,017 


549 


55 


17,701 


62 


21 


3,475 


138 


24 


2,335 


288 


49 


8,203 


13 


18 


1,144 


300 


32 


5,832 


623 


41 


13,710 


752 


72 


17,132 


270 


34 


10,093 


178 


28 


3,144 


390 


69 


14,780 



go „ 

2— o 
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-at:! 

S-33 

O 



Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Atlantic 

Avery 

Beulah 

Bladen 

Blue Ridge 

Brier Creek 

Brunswick 

Brushy Mountain 

Buncombe 

Caldwell 

Cape Fear-Columbus.. 

Carolina 

Catawba River 

Central 

Chowan 

Dock 

Eastern 

Elkin 

Flat River 

French Broad 

Gaston County 

Green River 

Haywood 

Johnston 

Kings Mountain 

Liberty 

Little River 

Macon 

Mecklenburg-Cabarrus 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Mount Zion 

Neuse 

New Found 

New South River 

Pamlico 

Pee Dee 

Piedmont 

Pilot Mountain 

Raleigh 

Randolph 

Roanoke 



1,255.64 

469.26 

295.97 

1,110.83 

5,967.65 

649.63 

4,162.56 

3,068.12 

3,685.69 

887.26 

940.69 

2,831.36 

14,944.04 

5,384.89 

4,780.62 

3,574.22 

4,438.23 

19,739.07 

13,840.34 

570.08 

7,480.68 

300.61 

6,545.27 

4,593.74 

18,008.66 

2,450.12 

3,740.96 

6,287.23 

17,168.30 

15,201.38 

6,747.93 

1,193.23 

26,508.23 

1,627.02 

1,759.11 

31,562.06 

3,995.65 

241.33 

6,054.01 

1,058.97 

7,625.02 

42,788.89 

28,301.57 

15,408.63 

3,148.44 

26,717.50 



7,046.72 

1,615.35 

2,457.92 

4,510.85 
25,378.22 

3,384.41 
18,485.54 
11,413.77 
16,348.86 

5,088.91 

4,268.42 
14,113.51 
81,899.66 
40,492.46 
22,666.98 
26,745.62 
31,737.48 
53,608.46 
50,737.60 

2,802.84 
25,333.14 

3,897.73 
30,513.22 
10,793.63 
89,839.49 
12,486.35 
16,478.12 
30,275.11 
75,296.17 
29,149.68 
25,952.27 

8,016.75 

138,068.10 

10,414.14 

9,783.09 
144,800.67 
20,723.03 

2,006.23 
28,097.12 

4,541.82 
41,913.92 
120,687.52 
127,370.72 
58,004.29 
20,479.79 
97,442.76 



8,302.36 

2,084.61 

2,753.89 

5,621.68 

31,345.87 

4,034.04 

22,648.10 

14,481.89 

20,034.55 

5,976.17 

5,209.11 

16,944.87 

96,843.70 

45,877.35 

27,447.60 

30,319.84 

36,175.71 

73,347.53 

64,577.94 

3,372.92 

32,813.82 

4,198.34 

37,058.49 

15,387.37 

107,848.15 

14,936.47 

20,219.08 

36,562.34 

92,464.47 

44,351.06 

32,700.20 

9,209.98 

164,576.33 

12,041.16 

11,542.20 

176,362.73 

24,718.68 

2,247.56 

34,151.13 

5,600.79 

49,538.94 

163,476.41 

155,672.29 

73,412.92 

23,628.23 

124,160.26 



Annual of Session 1935 229 

STATISTICAL REPORT OF ALL ASSOCIATIONS— Continued 



Associations 



Robeson 

Rowan 

Sandy Creek 

Sandy Run 

South Fork 

South Mountain 

South Yadkin 

Stanly 

Stone Mountain 

Stony Fork 

Surry 

Tar River 

Tennessee River 

Three Forks 

Transylvania 

Tuckaseigee 

Union 

West Chowan 

West Liberty 

Western North Carolina 

Wilmington 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Totals 



247 
299 
516 
421 
153 
308 
228 
116 

63 
247 
327 
324 
376 

88 
164 
389 
382 
201 
336 
262 
168 
210 



18,768 



2,436 



•S 6 

U 



11,129 
5,311 
7,416 

13,490 
7,331 
2,742 
6,566 
6,443 
2,914 
1,485 
6,747 

12,904 
5,( 
5,478 
3,575 
5,502 
8,788 

14,621 
2,604 
5,391 
8,469 
5,000 
4,340 



458,517 



§U 



20,149.77 

5,993.80 

5,483.53 

3,998.10 

10,519.54 

567.56 

9,988.72 

7,180.97 

182.14 

287.07 

5,061.98 

10,044.13 

2,764.46 

3,471.03 

1,833.55 

1,105.67 

4,129.87 

23,267.39 

209.43 

736.02 

15,297.75 

3,198.45 

1,439.59 



$ 516,022.21 



■3<J a - 

^ _c c i- 



56,230.55 

38,282.85 

35,468.91 

52,247.79 

50,933.91 

8,325.24 

35,228.21 

25,030.59 

2,127.18 

1,210.04 

21,694.36 

39,274.46 

3,526.01 

12,355.49 

8,910.12 

8,573.46 

28,710.02 

71,778.13 

2,336.32 

8,314.68 

58,216.83 

13,610.33 

5,449.19 



32,195,003.11 



Oj o 



76,380.32 
44,276.65 
40,952.44 
56,245.89 
61,453.45 

8,892.80 
45,216.93 
32,211.56 

2,309.32 

1,497.11 
26,756.34 
49,318.59 

6,290.47 
15,826.52 
10,743.67 

9,679.33 
32,839.89 
95,046.32 

2,545.75 

9,050.70 
73,514.58 
16,808.78 

6,888.78 



?2,711,025.32 



INDIAN ASSOCIATIONS 



Burnt Swamp 
Cherokee 

Totals. 



59 



2,265 
581 



2,846 



669.17 
40.26 



709.43 



3,993.39? 4,662.56 
305.51 345.77 



2 4,298.80 



? 4,908.33 



230 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 











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232 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



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Annual of Session 1935 



23: 



MINISTERIAL STUDENTS FROM NORTH CAROLINA 
AT OUR COLLEGES AND SEMINARIES 

BAPTIST BIBLE INSTITUTE 

New Orleans. La. 



Carl A. Marsh, Belmont 
*Mrs. Carl A. Marsh, Belmont 



'Miss Elizabeth Bragg. Marshall 



BOILING SPRINGS COLLEGE 
Boiling Springs 



J. Carl Avers, Avondale 
B. B. Brooks, Mooresboro 
Paul Bullington, Shelby 
George Carver, Forest City 
Roy Greene, Mills Spring 
Hugh Harrill. Lattimore 
L. B. Harris, Mooresboro 



Woodrow Hill, High Point 
Xolan Howington. Shelby 
Arvill Icard, Granite Falls 
A. C. Lovelace, Jr., Forest City 
W. T. Luckadoo. Mooresboro 
Graham Piercy. Henrietta 
Marlow Stroupe, Shelby 



CAMPBELL COLLEGE 

Bute's Creek 



Charles W. Bartholomew 
Paul Childress. Buie's Creek 
William B. Cone, Spring Hope 
Drewry Frazier. Yirgilina, Va. 
Linwood Swanson Griffin. Castalia 
Xorman Arrington Hicks. Hender- 
son 
Grover Cleveland Kinlaw, Lumber- 
ton 



Ralph Lloyd, Buie's Creek 
William Buie Mclver, Cumnock 
Raymond Elsworth Moore. 

Castalia 
James E. Swinson, Thomasville 
LeRoy James Teachey, Wallace 
Charles W. Wagner. Spencer 
William Edgar West. Monks 

Corner, S. C. 



FRUITLAND INSTITUTE 
Hexdersoxville 



Glen Cagle, Asheville 
Wavne Deitz, Belmont 



William Hamilton. Etowah 



MARS HILL COLLEGE 
Mars Hill 



Henry Dennis Anderson, Clover, 

Va." 
C. D. Barringer. Salisbury 
Clinard Brooks, Granite Falls 
Ralph Lee Cannon, Stanley 



Arthur Dixon, Greensboro 
M. D. Dunkley. Scottsburg. Ya. 
W. F. Fleming, Drayton, S. C. 
C. F. Forbes, Johnson City. Tenn. 
Thomas T. Fulk. Mount Airy 



Taking Christian Training. 



234 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Wilson Glass, Nathalie, Va. 
Richard Lee Goodson, Morristown, 

Term. 
J. M. Gragg, Johnson City, Tenn. 
Clarence Gwaltney, Hiddenite 
Harry Hand, Cramerton 
William Hill, Verona, N. J. 
Julius Holloway, Buie's Creek 
Daniel Kester, Hilton Village, Va. 
Richard Ledbetter, Havre de 

Grace, Md. 
Eddie Lieberman, Greenwood, 

S. C. 
Miller Lindsay, Landrum, S. C. 
Austin Lovings, Greensboro 
Enoch Sumpter Morgan, Stocks- 

ville 
U. A. Moss, Palmetto, Ga. 



John Murray, Charleston, S. C. 

John Sidney McGee, Kernersville 

Joe Parsons, Charlotte 

Heber F. Peacock, Porterville, 
Calif. 

Jerome Pee, Mars Hill 

Paul Roberts, Johnson City, Tenn. 

W. A. Sanderson, Pembroke 

George Shaver, Rankin, Tenn. 

Walter Smoak, Youngs Island, 
S. C. 

John F. Stevens, Spartanburg, S. C. 

Mack Summey, Black Mountain 

Warren F. Taylor, Washington, 
D. C. 

J. R. Thompson, Wheatley, Ky. 

Marion Albert Woodson, Pendle- 
ton, S. C. 



SOUTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Louisville, Ky. 



R. K. Benfield, Lenoir 

M. D. Blanton, Mooresboro 

J. B. Brooks, Rowland 

Jno. E. Carter, Rockwell 

R. P. Caudill, North Wilkesboro 

K. S. Combs, Wilson 

R. E. Connell, Kannapolis 

G. H. Cross, Lexington 

W. W. Finlator, Raleigh 

C. W. Glosson, Greensboro 

Geo. J. Griffin, Pittsboro 

A. J. Hawes. Rose Hill 

G. A. Hendricks, Nashville 

W. B. Johnson, Lillington 

M. H. Kendall, Fayetteville 

A. M. Kiser, Bessemer City 



John W. Lambert, Raleigh 
G. C. Lewis, High Point 
F. H. Malone, Lumberton 

F. E. Morris, Sunbury 
W. D. Morris, Sunbury 
O. J. Murphy, Louisburg 

D. G. Myers, Mooresville 
J. B. Ousley, Buie's Creek 
O. J. Owens, Wilson 

J. W. Pearce, Raleigh 

G. R. Pendergraph, Durham 
G. L. Royster, Shelby 

E. M. Walker, Morganton 

E. L. Weston, Guilford College 
W. A. Weston, Guilford College 

F. T. Woodward, Statesville 



SOUTHWESTERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Seminary Hill, Texas 



Ernest Brown, Brevard 
*Flora Cavenaugh, Wallace 
Robert T. Daniel, Charlotte 



Roy A. Griffin, Mountain Park 
Ray P. Ingraham, Asheville 
*Mrs. C. C. Prince, Boiling Springs 



* Taking Christian Training. 



Annual of Session 1935 



235 



WINGATE JUNIOR COLLEGE 

WlNGATE 



E. K. Davis, Charlotte 
R. L. Dixon, Charlotte 
Leland Mabry, Albemarle 
J. D. Marler, Jr., Wingate 
Crowell Pierce, Waxhaw 



Dean Pittman, Tigerville, S. C. 
Clarion Potter, Erwin, Tenn. 
Ernest Smith, Albemarle 
J. B. Spittle, Jr., Wingate 



WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Wake Forest 



P. M. Atkins, Holly Springs 
H. O. Baker. Matthews 
J. W. Baker, Harrellsville 

E. F. Beale, Franklin, Va. 
J. H. Blackmore, Warsaw 
D. M. Branch, Raleigh 

M. R. Breedlove, Middleburg 

D. F. Brooks. Shelby 

Eugene Brown, Rose Hill 

W. A. Brown, Selma 

J. H. Butler, Atkinson 

Sam Carswell, Morganton 

J. W. Castello, Windsor 

J. H. Copeland, Jr., Ahoskie 

Robert Costner, Greensboro 

William Dancy, North Wilkesboro 

H. G. Dawkins, St. Pauls 

Olin Dellinger, Dallas 

J. H. Dixon, Greensboro 

T. L. Ervin, Catawba 

L. W. Fields, Four Oaks 

B. C. Fisher, Canton 

H. F. Forbes, Jr., Riddle 
H. J. Ford, Taylorsville 
G. A. Francis, Waynesville 
W. C. Francis, Forest City 
H. Y. Gamble, Waxhaw 
Cloyd Gantt, Statesville 
W. F. Gentry, Roxboro 

C. O. Greene, Shelby 

H. L. Hart, Green Cone, Ya. 

K. M. Hayes, Charlottesville, Ya. 

F. D. Hemphill. Union Mills 
I. C. Herrin, Concord 



L. W. Hewett, Absecon Heights, 

N. J. 
W. S. Flicks. Jr.. Raleigh 
G. T. High, Dallas 
C. E. Hobgood, Oxford 
C. F. Home, Roseboro 
R. T. Howerton, Jr., Durham 
Wilbur Huneycutt, Oakboro 

C. C. Hurst, Spartanburg, S. C. 
O. H. Jackson, Jr., Winterville 

F. W. Jennings, Elizabeth, W. Va. 

J. D. Johnson, Bolivia 

J. M. Johnson, Wake Forest 

E. G. Jones, Jr., Wadesboro 

H. E. Jones, Buie's Creek 

L. J. Knox, Hickory 

Percy Lancaster, Lexington 

Rowell Lane, Bostic 

D. J. Larkins, Wilmington 
Pierson Lockamy, Wade 

E. T. Malone, Williamston 

F. R. Moore, Can- 
Jack Memory, Durham 
Gerald Motley, Buie's Creek 
W. G. Nagel, Trenton, N. J. 
P. B. Nickens, Calypso 
John Ousley, Lillingtou 

W. B. Pittard, Oxford 
Earl Rogers, Rose Hill 

E. W. Ross, Hope Mills 
C. P. Santa, Hallsboro 

F. H. Scofield, Poplar Bluff, Mo. 
Y. W. Sears, Concord 

B. L. Shore, Charlotte 



236 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



W. S. Smith, Kannapolis 
R. T. Stancil, Garner 
H. R. Starling, Wake Forest 
J. A. Stevens, Goldsboro 
H. B. Stokes, Winston-Salem 
A. E. Strickland, Stedman 
J. M. Sykes, Greensboro 
Roger Tatum, Elizabethtown 



C. W. Teague, Wake Forest 

C. R. Taylor, Lumberton 

H. E. Walden, Monroe 

J. M. Wester, Louisburg 

J. D. Whisnant, Newton 

R. L. Wilson, Broadway 

T. K. Woody, Jr., Wilmington 

A. P. Whealton, Morehead City 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION TRAINING SCHOOL 

Louisville. Ky. 



Lucile Blake, Wilmington 
Elma Currin, Henderson 
Vivian Grant, Wilmington 
Olive Jackson, Winterville 
Mildred Kichline, Raleigh 



Elizabeth Lassiter, Raleigh 
Ruth Snipes, Burgaw 
Mrs. Bess E. Stone, Greensboro 
Helen Wells, Edenton 



Annual of Session 1935 237 

NORTH CAROLINA MISSIONARIES ON 
FOREIGN FIELDS 

R. T. Bryan, Shanghai, China Appointed 1885 

Mrs. George W. Green, Canton, China 1891 

W. C. Newton, Tsingtae, Shantung Province, China.... 1903 

Mrs. Maude Burke Dozier, Kokura, Japan 1906 

Miss Catherine Bryan, Shanghai, China 1908 

Mrs. Mary Bryson Tipton, Shanghai, China " 1909 

Miss Laura Cox, Mexico " 1910 

Chas. A. Leonard, Harbin, Manchuria 1910 

Mrs. Evelyn Corbett Leonard, Harbin, Manchuria " 1910 

W. D. Bostick, Poochow, China " 1910 

J. B. Hipps, Shanghai, China 1913 

H. H. McMillan, Soochow, China " 1913 

Mrs. Lelia Memory McMillan, Soochow, China 1913 

Miss Pearl Johnson, Shanghai, China " 1915 

Miss Attie Bostick, Pweiteh, China " 1916 

Miss Cora Caudle, Africa " 1918 

A. R. Gallamore, Waichow, China " 1918 

V. V. McGuire, China " 1919 

J. C. Powell, Saki, Africa " 1919 

Mrs. Rosa Hocutt Powell, Saki, Africa " 1919 

James Walton Moore, Chefoo, China " 1920 

M. T. Rankin, Canton, China " 1920 

*Miss Alda Grayson, Laichowfu, China " 1921 

Miss Naomi E. Schell, Tobita, Japan " 1921 

Lonnie Elwood Blackman, Shanghai, China " 1922 

Mrs. Gladys Yates Blackman, Shanghai, China " 1922 

Miss Katie Murray, Chengchow, China " 1922 

Mrs. Nell Lawrence Bostick, China " 1923 

Mrs. Belle Tyner Johnson, Shanghai, China " 1923 

John A. Abernathy, Tsiman, China " 1924 

Phillip E. White, Kweith, China " 1924 

Mrs. Mattie Norman White, Kweith, China " 1924 

Frank T. N. Woodard, Kong Moon, China " 1924 

William B. Johnson, Soochow, China " 1925 

Miss Marjorie Spence, Temuco, Chile " 1925 

A. S. Gillespie, Kaif eng, China " 1931 

Mrs. Pauline Pittard Gillespie, Kaif eng, China " 1931 

Edwin B. Dozier, Fukuoka, Japan " 1932 

Mrs. Mary Wiley Dozier, Fukuoka, Japan " 1932 

Mrs. Virginia Lake, Canton, China " 1933 

Miss Elizabeth Hale, China " 1934 

W. Shelby Vance, China " 1935 

Miss Maud Cobb, Budapest, Hungary " 1935 

Miss Ruby Daniel, Budapest, Hungary " 1935 

* At home on furlough. 



238 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

STATISTICAL SUMMARY 

We gratefully acknowledge our gratitude to God for his blessings 
upon us during the year. Throughout the state there has been evidence 
of a return of prosperity. Bountiful harvests with attendant good prices 
for farm products and a general increase in business of all kinds have 
brought new hope and heart to our people. With pleasure we record the 
fact that our church people have responded in a fine way to the call of 
the world. They have shared their blessings with others beyond last 
year. Many more than formerly have given a good account of their 
stewardship by sharing their blessings with others through the Mission 
enterprise. 

The greatest hindrance to all activities was the epidemic of infantile 
paralysis which swept through the state during June, July, August and 
September. More than six hundred cases were reported. Hundreds of 
the churches were closed to the children and Sunday school operations 
were suspended during the summer. On this account many young people 
and adults remained away from church, thereby causing a slump in 
contributions or gifts, as well as Bible school and preaching attendance. 

In spite of the epidemic of Polio contributions show a fine increase. 
A glance at the Statistical Tables will reveal appreciable gains in gifts. 
The finest progress, however, has been in spirit, attitudes, and outlook. 
One feels it in all the churches, in Associational meetings and all general 
gatherings in city, town and rural churches. A feeling of optimism pre- 
vails everywhere in denominational circles. Secretary M. A. Huggins 
has led us all in a great and far-reaching program of teaching. Em- 
phasis has been placed on the study of our distinctive Baptist doctrines, 
along with renewed study of the subjects of stewardship, discipleship 
and missions. 

We state, and shall repeat it until the- truth of God's Word shall 
become real to our people and a vital thing in their lives, that what is 
needed most is that God's people tithe their income in support of the 
work of the Kingdom. The principle of the tithe will, if practiced, 
enable God's children to preach the gospel around the world. If North 
Carolina Baptists had tithed their net earnings this year they would 
have given into the Lord's treasury more than twelve million dollars. 
We face the old issue of whether the material shall control us instead 
of the spiritual. "What shall it profit a man if he gain the whole 
world and lose his soul ?" 

The "prove me" plan or tithing movement is gaining favor with 
many of the churches. Tithing is the one salvation to all our financial 
difficulties. We repeat : "Let the churches be constant in teaching the 
people what to do with material things entrusted to them. Our con- 
viction is that most people love their churches and possess the desire 



Annual of Session 1935 239 

to have a part in giving them worthy support, also that they will respond 
to a financial program that is worthy of their support. They are not 
afraid of the money question when it is presented in the light of the 
truth of the Scriptures and with a challenge to rise up and meet world 
needs. 

"Evangelism" should be our battle cry in the New Year. There 
are still myriads of lost people around us. They are wholly without a 
Saviour. 

BAPTISMS 

The number of baptisms for the year is 18,768. No baptisms were 

reported by 653 churches. Thirty-five Indian churches reported 59 

baptisms. 

CHURCH MEMBERSHIP 

The number of churches is 2,346 

Gain in number of churches is 26 

The number of church members is 458,517 

Gain in church members is 7,749 

There are 35 Indian churches with a membership of 2,846 

GIFTS 

All figures are given for the Associational year and not the calendar 
year. Gifts to all Missions, Education and Benevolences total $516,- 
022.21. This sum is a gain over last year of $20,203.98. For all local 
work as debts, buildings, fuel, lights, pastoral support and other oper- 
ating expenses the sum given was $2,195,003.11. The sum represents 
a gain over last year of $161,732.80. The total of all gifts to all causes 
is $2,711,025.32. The total gain in contributions to all causes is 
$181,936.78. 

CO-OPERATING CHURCHES 

Churches contributing to denominational objects number 2,209. This 
number is an increase of 150 over last year. Only 227 failed to con- 
tribute to one or more of the Convention's institutions. 

PER CAPITA GIFTS 

The per capita gift to all causes, local and outside is $5.91. Gifts 
to denominational causes alone are $1.12 per capita. 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

There are 2,430 Sunday Schools with an enrollment of 384,254. 
Gain in number of schools is 46. Perry Morgan is Secretary of the 
Sunday School Department. L. L. Morgan is Field Worker. Mrs. 
C. D. Bain, Dunn, is Approved Elementary Worker. Mrs. John B. 
Lane, Lenoir, is Approved Intermediate Worker. The headquarters 
office is 200 Biblical Recorder Building, Raleigh. 



240 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

DAILY VACATION BIBLE SCHOOLS 

The epidemic of infantile paralysis caused all but 65 of about 150 
schools planned not to be held. 

BAPTIST training union 

There are 2,641 organizations with 60,703 members. Winnie Rickett 
is Secretary of the Department. Mabel Starnes is Field Worker. The 
headquarters office is at 200 Biblical Recorder Building. Raleigh. 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Woman's Missionary Union reports run from January 1 to December 
31, and 1935 reports cannot be compiled before this annual of North 
Carolina State Convention goes to press so the figures below are of 
1934. 

In 1934 there were 2,913 organizations of Woman's Missionary Union 
reporting. The roll is revised each year and when no report is sent 
during the year the organization is dropped from the roll until it does 
report. The membership in these organizations totaled 52,185. Organ- 
ized work was done in fifty-nine Associations, each one holding its 
separate annual meeting. Eleven hundred and ninety-two organizations 
made at least four points on the Standard of Excellence and 388 made 
all ten points. Eighteen hundred and two mission study classes were 
held, with thirteen hundred and seventy-four seals awarded. The 1934 
Heck Memorial Offering, $3,831.57 was appropriated as follows: Equip- 
ment of Yang Chow Hospital, China, $1,000.00; Single Women's Mis- 
sionaries' Home, Wuchow, China, $1,000.00; Helen Dozier's Passage to 
Japan and First Year's Salary, $1,500.00; Supplies for Alda Grayson's 
Work in Kathleen Mallory Hospital, Laichowfu, China, $300.00. 

The total contributions for the year, $181,946.16. 

Officers for 1934: Mrs. W. N. Jones, President; Mrs. Edna R. 
Harris, Corresponding Secretary ; Miss Elsie K. Hunter, Treasurer ; 
and Miss Mary Currin, Young- People's Secretary. Office : Biblical 
Recorder Building, Raleigh, X. C. 

THE BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

The Book Store is at Baptist Headquarters, Second Floor, Biblical 
Recorder Building, Raleigh, Mrs. Roger P. Marshall is Manager. 

ASSOCIATIONS LEADING 

In number of churches. Pilot Mountain 71 ; Roanoke 69 ; Tar River 
63 ; Robeson 61 ; West Chowan 55 ; Sandy Run 57 ; Buncombe 57 ; Mount 
Zion 55 ; Sandy Creek 54 ; and the Tennessee River 52. 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 



Associations and Superintendents 

Alleghanj — Mrs. Amos Wagoner, Sparta 

Ashe — Mrs. Ralph Parsons, West Jefferson 

Atlantic — Mrs. J L. Hodges, New Bern 

Avery — Mrs. R. T. Teague, Newland 

Beulah— Mrs. R. L. Wilburn 

Bladen— Mrs. R. J. Hall, Bladenboro 

Blue Ridge — Mrs. J. L. Morgan, Marion 

Brushy Mountain — Mrs. Eugene Olive, Norrh Wilkesbro 

Brunswick — Miss Ruth Ludlum, Shallotte 

Buncombe — Mrs. D. C. Martin, Asheville 

Burnt Swamp — Mrs. M. C. Lunsford, Pembroke 

Caldwell — Mrs. J. A. Triplett, Lenoir 

Cape Fear-Columbus — Mrs. J. T. McKenzie, Whiteville 

Carolina — Mrs. O. J. Smith, Hendersonville 

Catawba River — Mrs. F. L. Smith, Drexel 

Central — Mrs. John O. Gough, Wake Forest 

Chowan — Mrs. J. E. White, Hertford 

Eastern — Miss Macy Cox, Magnolia 

Flat River — Mrs. Sterling Carrington, Oxford 

French Broad — Mrs. R. L. Moore, Mars Hill 

Gaston — Mrs. C. P. Nanney, Gastonia 

Green River — Mrs. G. G. O'Neill, Rutherfordton 

Haywood — Mrs. J. H. Haynes, Clyde 

Johnston — Mrs. G. E. Lovell, Clayton 

King's Mountain — Mrs. John Wacaster, Cherryville 

Liberty — Miss Sallie McCracken, Thomasville 

Little River — Mrs. Paul Bradley, Kipling 

Macon — Mrs. Sam Gibson, Iotla 

Mecklenburg-Cabarrus — Mrs. B. S. Blanton, Charlotte 

Mitchell — Mrs. D. A. Greene, Bakersville 

Montgomery — Mrs. J. E. Hodge, Troy 

Mount Zion — Mrs. Ira D. S. Knight, Durham 

Neuse — Mrs. Fred Harrell, Goldsboro 

New South River — Mrs. R. P. Harris, Gibson 

Pamlico — Mrs. W. F. Woodall, Belhaven 

Pee Dee— Mrs. Wallace Hartsell, Hamlet 

Piedmont — Mrs. Nettie Hoge, Greensboro 

Pilot Mountain — Mrs. J. J. Roddick, Winston-Salem 

Raleigh — Mrs. G. N. Cowan, Apex 

Roanoke — Mrs. R. C. Josey, Jr., Scotland Neck 

Robeson — Mrs. A. B. Wood, Maxton 

Rowan — Mrs. C. S. Wall, Salisbury 

Sandy Creek — Mrs. Herbert Grimes, Siler City 

Sandy Run — Mrs. G. G. O'Neill, Rutherfordton 

South Fork — Mrs. George Grice, Lincolnton 

South Yadkin — Miss Laura Lazenby, States ville 

Stanly— Mrs. T. S. Crutchfield, Albemarle 

Surry — Mrs. W. A. Jackson, Mount Airy 

Tar River — Miss Lillie Harper, Louisburg 

Tennessee River — Mrs. A. J. Franklin, Bryson City 

Three Forks — Mrs. J. L. Quails, Boone 

Transylvania— Mrs. M. C. Shipman, Pisgah Forest 

Tuckaseigee — Mrs. W. N. Cook, Webster 

Union — Mrs. Wilton A. Williams, Monroe 

West Chowan — Mrs. R. M. Maddrey, Seaboard 

Western North Carolina — Mrs. J. L. Underwood. Hayesville 

Wilmington — Mrs. J. W. Carroll, St. Stephens, S. C 

Yadkin — Mrs. D. H. Craver, Boonville 

Yancey — Mrs. E. D. Wilson, Burnsville 

Miscellaneous 

Training School Allotment 

Training School loan funds 

Totals 



Number 


Member- 


Con- 


Societies 


ship 


tributions 


5 


78 


63.98 


8 


118 


65.31 


49 


342 


2,273.28 


5 


59 


111.00 


56 


1,019 


2,364.12 


33 


368 


916.88 


23 


175 


697.50 


20 


348 


864.53 


28 


200 


239.61 


84 


1,400 


4,643.37 


31 


472 


224.30 


29 


500 


1,588.50 


34 


415 


1,035.32 


26 


360 


1,607.67 


22 


560 


1,702.70 


S3 


686 


8,730.95 


142 


2,372 


5,628.17 


87 


1,442 


2,427.20 


65 


1,139 


1,822.44 


14 


290 


793.10 


60 


1,138 


6,109.73 


18 


220 


710.98 


24 


334 


1,254.78 


52 


955 


2,324.70 


71 


1,720 


4,767.22 


65 


1,275 


5,060.16 


56 


1,092 


2,367.61 


17 


135 


270.40 


83 


2,080 


7,147.09 


14 


79 


261.86 


21 


337 


542.19 


121 


2,576 


13,304.91 


21 


470 


1,889.49 


50 


700 


1,579.26 


18 


249 


358.08 


62 


1,160 


3,202.17 


105 


2,118 


19,602.59 


139 


3,477 


15,714.04 


75 


1,000 


5,290.97 


146 


3,144 


9,934.12 


108 


1,000 


5,004.92 


27 


538 


2,310.57 


62 


1,600 


2,148.22 


64 


1,575 


1,210.43 


41 


613 


2,113.33 


52 


733 


4,037.51 


33 


743 


2,026.08 


25 


410 


1,791.35 


91 


1,420 


3,401.21 


7 


100 


116.15 


24 


435 


465.35 


19 


285 


495 . 24 


14 


3U0 


218.05 


42 


986 


1,416.19 


175 


3,210 


7,843.85 


18 


144 


216.30 


51 


1,134 


5,093.48 


24 


227 


583.09 


9 


130 


216.31 
932.10 







352.57 


-_ 


... 


206.25 


2,913 


52,185 


3181,946.16 



242 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Preacher of 

Introductory 

Sermon 




John Armstrong 
William P. Biddle 
David S. Williams 
Wm. Richards 
John Kerr 
John Armstrong 
A. J. Battle 
James S. Mims 
John Armstrong 
J. J. Finch 
Wm. Hill Jordan 
J. J. Finch 
Eli Philips 
R. McNabb 
G. M. Thompson 
W. T. Brooks 
J. S. Purefoy 
David S. Williams 
C. R. Hendrickson 
John B. White 
Wm. Hooper 
James McDaniel 
R. I. Devin 
A. McDowell 
T. W. Tobey 


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William Roles. 

Amos J. Battle _ 

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J. J. James 

William A. Shaw 

John H. Lacey .- 

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A. McDowell 

T. S. Yarborough 

W. M. Wingate 


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A. J. Battle 

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George W. Johnson 


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Alfred Dockery 

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Alfred Dockery 

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Fayetteville _. . 

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Annual of Session 1935 



243 



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244 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Preacher of 

Introductory 

Sermon 


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J. S. Dill 

T. H. Pritchard 

Thomas Hume 

J. S. Hardaway 

J. W. Carter 

T. J. Taylor 

A. M. Simms 

J. B. Richardson 

A. C. Barron 

W. S. Penick 

R. T. Vann 

W. M. Vines 

W. C. Tyree 

C. S. Blackwell 

C. W. Duke 

J. W. Lynch 

J. M. Frost, of Tenn. 

Fred D. Hale 

W. R. Bradshaw 

Wm. Lunsford 

G. T. Watkins 

J. J. Hall 

W. R. L. Smith 

Q. C. Davis 


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Annual of Session 1935 



245 



W. N. Johnson 

E. T. Carter 

T. W. O'Kelley 

C. B. Walker 

Bruce Benton 

J. D. Harte 

J. C. Turner 

J. J. Hurt 

Q. C. Davis 

W. A. Ayers 

J. W. Kincheloe 

A. P. Bagby 

W. D. Spinx 

J. A. Ellis 

Zeno Wall 

Fred A. Bower 

J. M. Kester 

J, R. Jester 

Arthur Jackson 

J. Powell Tucker 

Wm. Louis Poteat 

Hugh E. Ellis 

Richard K. Redwine 


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John A. Oates 

_.__do 

do 

B. W. Spilman 

do 

___.do 

__._do 

do 

_.__do 

..__do 

I. M. Mercer 

do 

do 

do 

J. Clyde Turner. _- 

.__.do 

___.do 

....do 

Zeno Wall 

....do 

....do 


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LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS 

This roster of ministers is made from the records furnished by the 
Associational Clerks who get the information from the clerks of the 
churches. If when a minister changes his address he will notify the 
Statistical Secretary of such change it will be greatly appreciated. From 
this list is made the mailing list for use at Baptist Headquarters in Ral- 
eigh, also the list of North Carolina ministers published in the Annual 
of the Southern Baptist Convention. Please give notice immediately of 
any needed correction. 

(Signed) Perry Morgan, Statistical Secretary. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



ORDAINED MINISTERS 

Abernathy, C. A., Icard 
Abernathy, W. W., Lumber Bridge 
Abrams, W. E.. Mount Holly 
Absher, A. F., Mertie 
Adams, R. E.. Mayodan 
Adams, T. O., Winston-Salem, R. 4 
Alexander, M. O., Raleigh 
Allard, J. E., Wilmington 
Allen, Clifton J., Fairmont 
Allgood, J. G., Yadkinville 
Almond, H. J., Mill Spring 
Almond, W. B., Albemarle. R. 4 
Ammons, J. C, Leaksville 
Anderson, H. B., Durham 
Andrews, E. N. C, Jr., Thomasville 
Andrews, V. L., Jacksonville 
Andrews, W. O., Raleigh, R. 3 
Arnold, H. L., Raleigh, 614 W. 

North St. 
Arrington, Ellis, Hazelwood 
Arrowood, R. C, Oakboro 
Ashley, Arthur C, Warrensville 
Ashley, G. N., Salemburg 
Ashley, W. D., Blowing Rock 
Atkins. R. E., Raleigh, R. 6 
Austin, B. F., East Gastonia 
Avers, W. A., Forest City 
Ayscue, P. E., Buie's Creek 
Bain, G. A., Dunn, R. 1 



WHO ARE PASTORS 

Baines, J. J., Alarka 

Baity, A. K., Spurgeon 

Baity, J. W., Highlands 

Baker, C. E.. Durham, 2100 Eruin 

Road 
Baker, E. F., Kernersville 
Baker, H. O., Wake Forest, R. 2 
Baker, Smoot A., Enka 
Ballard, L. E„ West Asheville, 

34 New St. 
Bangle, L. A., Lincolnton 
Barker, M. F., Roaring River 
Barker, Robert, Bryson City 
Barnes, D. C, Lumberton, R. 5 
Barnes, J. H., Rose Hill 
Barnes, L. C, Fair Bluff 
Barnes, L. E., Hiddenite 
Barnes, M. L., Mount Holly 
P.arnes, R. L., Boone 
Barnette, Henlee, Kannapolis 
Barnette, L. P., Lowell 
Barringer, C. D., Salisbury, R. 2 
Bassett, W. M., Clinton 
Bass, R. L., Albemarle 
Barton, A. J., Wilmington 
Baucom, C. E., Concord, 202 

McGill St. 
Baucom, H. W., Gas.onia, Victory 

Station 



[247] 



248 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Baucom, H. W., Waynesville 
Baucom, H. W., Jr., Murphy 
Baucom, W. T., St. Paul's 
Beach, W. R., Lenoir, R. 2 
Beam, Leonard, Mortimer 
Bean, H. F., Rutherfordton 
Beavers, E. A., Suit 
Beck, Arnold, Smokemont 
Belton J. O., Mount Airy 
Benfield, H. S., Lenoir 
Benfield, J. G., Morganton 
Bennett, J. C, Norwood 
Bennett, J. P., Asheville 
Benton, A. L., Benson, R. 2 
Benton, Bruce, Rockingham 
Berry, Kennedy, Wadesboro 
Beshears, Lee, Parsonville 
Biddle, J. T., Franklinton 
Biggerstaff, W. P., Lincolnton, 

R. 5 
Biggs, W. O., Elizabethtown 
Biles, T. H., Southport 
Binkley, J. N., Harmony 
Binkley, O. T., Chapel Hill 
Bishop, Joseph, Gay 
Black, C. J., Bessemer City 
Black, J. H., Windom 
Black, R. H., North Charlotte 
Blackburn, M. D., West Jefferson 
Blackwell, Hoyt, Mars Hill 
Blake, J. M., Raleigh 
Blalock, Jesse, Micaville 
Blanton, M. D., Mooresboro, R. 1 
Blevins, M. A., Winston-Salem, 

3055 N. Patterson St. 
Blevins, S. L., Hayes 
Blevins, T. E., New Life 
Blythre, C. E., Penrose, R. 1 
Bobbitt, David E., Cherryville 
Boggan, W. H., Rockingham 
Bolch, O. H., Wake Forest 
Bomar, John, Fairview 
Bond, W. E., Varina 
Booe, M. F., Lillington 
Booker, E. B., Apex 



Booth, J. H., Rose Hill 
Bost, W. E., Granite Falls 
Bowen, G. G., Gastonia, R. 2 
Bower, F. A., Albemarle 
Bowers, B. A., Gastonia 
Bowers, H. C, Goldsboro 
Bowman, J. N., Erlanger 
Bradley, Earl L., Spencer 
Bradley, Vandaley, Cherokee 
Bradshaw, W. R., Hickory 
Bragg, J. L., Marshall 
Branch, D. M., Wake Forest 
Bray, B. F., Marion 
Bray, Tom W., Greensboro, 1913 

Asheboro St. 
Brickhouse, R. E., Warrenton 
Briggs, W. T. C, Edenton 
Brinkley, R. O., China Grove, 

Box 50 
Brinson, H. F., Lcwiston 
Brisson, Curtis, St. Paul's 
Britt, I. F., Lumberton, R. 2 
Britt, N. F., High Point, 705 

Bridges St. 
Britt, P. T., Bladenboro 
Brock, J. A.. Forest City, R. 2 
Brooks, B. B., Mooresboro, R. 2 
Brooks, C. E., Gastonia 
Brooks, C. V., Rowland 
Brooks, E. M., Peachland 
Brooks, Nathan C, Bryson City 
Broom, H. M., Rosman 
Brothers, A. R., Rockingham 
Brown, A. L., Benson 
Brown, A. M., Boone 
Brown, G. W., Boone 
Brown, H. J., Young Harris, Ga. 
Brown, J. C, Cranberry 
Brown, J. E., Tuckaseigee 
Brown, J. M., Nealsville 
Brown, T. L., Gates 
Brown, W. V., Cycle 
Bryant, J. S., Roaring River 
Bryant, H. G., Clinton 
Bryant, K. E., Powellsville 



Annual of Session 1935 



249 



Bryant, W. B., Patterson 
Bryant, W. N., Lenoir, Route 1 
Buchanan, Ade, Windom 
Buchanan, Avery, Micaville 
Buchanan, Clarence A., Ledger 
Buchanan, M. L., Spruce Pine 
Buchanan, W. L., Bryson City 
Buckner, J. W., San ford 
Bullis, H. A., North Wilkesboro 
Bumgarner, E. V., Taylorsville. 

R. 2 
Bunn, John H., Murfreesboro 
Burch, G. W, Paw Creek 
Burger, J. A., Sweet Gum, Ga. 
Burgess, I. H., Candor 
Burkett, G. C, Jefferson 
Burkett, O. F., Canton, R. F. D. 
Burns, Ford A., Stantonsburg 
Burns, W. M., Franklin 
Burrell, D. E., Argura 
Burrell, J. F., Franklin 
Burrell, W. R., Biltmore 
Burris, C. C, Wingate 
Burrus, G. E., Rockford 
Burrus, L. W., Boonville 
Burt, J. E., Ninety Six, S. C. 
Butler, A. A., Hertford 
Butler, E. P., Whiteville 
Byerly, E. W., Bonlee 
Byrd, C. E., Durham. R. 4 
Byrd, R. L., St. Paul's 
Byrum. J. T., Tyner 
Cabe, L. A., Green's Creek 
Cain, A. T., Bladenboro 
Cain, G. S., Phafftown 
Cain, L. W., Casar 
Caldwell, B. B., Greenville. S. C. 

105 President St. 
Caldwell, C. A., Hillsboro 
Cale, W. F., Jr., Tyner 
Calloway, J. W., State Road 
Camp, W. G, Cherryville 
Campbell, A. L., Lincolnton, R. 3 
Campbell, Roy D., Wing 
Canipe, J. C, Boone 



Cannady, E. H., Ayden 
Cannon, D. Boyd, Granite Falls, 

R. 2 
Cantrell, J. R., Newton 
Canupe, B. M., Mars Hill 
Carroll, L. A., Murphy 
Carroll, R. D., Hudson 
Carroll, Van, Denton 
Carter, J. E., Selma, R. 2 
Carter, J. F., Winston-Salem, 2025 

Long View Dr. 
Carter, J. R., Hammonds, S. C. 
Carter, L. P., Lumberton 
Cashwell, C. H., Wendell 
Cashwell, R. N„ Lumberton 
Cashwell, T. L., Gastonia 
Caudle, E. P., Yadkinville 
Caudle, T. A., Courtney 
Caudle, Zeb, Charlotte 
Chambers. Gay, Canton, R. 2 
Chaney, R. L., Jr., Kings Mountain 
Chapman. M. G, Lincolnton, R. 3 
Chapman, N. H., Rosman 
Chappell, J. D., Robbinsville 
Chavis, George J., Red Springs, 

R. 2 
Chavis, Z. R., Pembroke 
Cheek, A. K., Durham 
Childress, R. N., Rocky Mount 
Chilton, J. W., Mount Airy 
Church, Avery M., Wilkesboro 
Church, John W., Summitt 
Clanton, D. C, Hamptonville 
Clark, Ben F., Thomasville 
Clark, L. F., Canton. R. 2 
Clemmons, D. M., Fayettevilk- 
Clner, G. A., Franklin. R. 4 
Cloer, M. G., Dallas 
Coble, Martin, Proctor 
Cockerham, C. C, Roaring River 
Coe, C. G., Greensboro, Pomona 

Station 
Coffey. H. L., Volney, Va. 
Cogburn, T. M., Canton 
Coggins, N. C, Wingate 



250 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Coggins. L. V.. Semora 

Cohn, E. A.. Winston-Salem. 224 

Lockland Ave. 
Cohn, D. K., Marshall. R. 1 
Cohn, H. D.. Candler 
Coker, Eugene, Mars Hill, Box 303 
Coley. J. L., Greensboro, Denim 

Station 
Collins, T. D.. Durham 
Comer, W. T., Stony Point 
Condray. G. A., Marion, R. 2 
Conrad. A. B., High Point 
Cook, Ben, Cowarts 
Cook. Charlie F., Granite Falls, 

R. 2 
Cook, John H, Raleigh, R. 5 
Cook, L. M., Mount Airy 
Cook, M. L., Glen Alpine 
Cook, Otis, Lawndale 
Cook. R. R.. Shelby 
Cook. W. B.. Greensboro, Pomona 

Station 
Cook, W. J., Boone 
Cook. W. N., Webster 
Cooper, T. N., Richlands 
Copeland, J. E., Askewville 
Corey, A., Jamesville 
Corn, J. A., Asheville. Woodfin 

Station 
Corn, Jesse, Marshall, R. 3 
Cornwell, Oliver, Murphy 
Cothren, Grant, Doughton 
Councilman, R. L., Morganton 
Covert. W. H.. Forest City, 425 

Arlington St. 
Cowan, G. N., Apex 
Coward, S. H, New Bern 
Cox. G. C, Weaverville 
Cox, J. A., Central Falls 
Cranford, A. B., China Grove 
Crawford, C. E., Bunn 
Crawford. L. H. Sylva, R. 1 
Crawford, R. L., Forest City, R. 1 
Cree, Arch C, Salisbury 
Creech. A. R., Micro 



Creech. C. S.. Kenly, R. 2 
Creech, Oscar, Ahoskie 
Crisman, W. T., Siloam 
Crouch, W. Perry, Morganton 
Crouse, W, M., Winston-Salem, 

R. 3 
Crow. C. C, Forest City, R. 1 
Crowder, B. R., Winston-Salem, 

2S32 Waughtown St. 
Culler. J. M.. Mount Airy 
Culler, Walter J., Norman 
Cullom, W. R., Wake Forest 
Currin, J. B., Roxboro 
Curtis, L. G.. Hudson 
Danner. G. D.. Crossnore 
Darnell, W. C, Lexington 
Davenport. C. W., Winston- Salem, 

R. 1 
Davis, B. L... Roxobel 
Davis. E. Gibson, Asheville 
Davis, G. W., Gastonia 
Davis, Henry T., Salisbury. R. 2 
Davis, J. B., Pembroke 
Davis, J. G., Wake Forest, R. 1 
Davis, J. P., Boonville 
Davis, J. P.. Cohvell. Ga. 
Davis. J. Y., Clyde, R. 1 
Davis. S. H. Mineral Bluff, Ga. 
Davis, Teho B., Zebulon 
Davis. Townley, Mount Grogan, 

S. C. 
Davis. W. L... Washington 
Davis. W. R.. Williston, S. C. 
Day, Fred N., Winston-Salem 
Day. D. C, Nantahala 
Day. Richard. Benham 
Deaver, Cade, Latta, S. C. 
Deitz. T. F., Sylva, R. 1 
Dellinger, J. L., Spear 
Dellinger, O. C, Collettsville 
Dempsey, D. S., Hertford 
Denny, G. L., Grassy Creek 
Denny, T. D., Flats 
Denny, W. E., Grassy Creek 
DcWesse, R. L., Salisbury 



Annual of Session 1935 



251 



Dickey. C. H., Raleigh 
Digh. D. W.. Salisbury, R. 4 
Dix, O. P., Randleman 
Dixon, L. M., Hertford 
Dorton, M. L., Albemarle 
Dosher, J. B., Southport 
Dove. A. H.. Bladenboro 
Downs, P. E., Clemmons 
Draughan, E. B., Elkin 
Draughan, T. S., Crutchfield 
Drum, Paul K., Maiden, R. 1 
Dry, M. H., Charlotte. R. 9 
Duncan, J. M., Murfreesboro 
Durham, C. H, Lumberton 
Durden, C. W., Charlotte 
Eagle, E. F., Salisbury 
Early, B. G.. Kinston, R. 4 
Early, J. F„ Rutherfordton 
Early, Waldo D., Hickory, R. 1 
Earp, G. J., Bolton 
Easier, J. A., Wake Forest 
Eddinger, Clyde, Welcome 
Edney, A. E., Flat Rock 
Edwards, John T., Henderson, 

Box 24 
Edwards, J. C, Staley 
Edwards, Wilbar L., Lumberton 
Edwards, Will. Barnardsville 
Eggers, R. C, Zionville 
Elam, W. A., Shelby 
Eller, A. W., Wilkesboro, R. 1 
Eller, E. A., Grassy Creek 
Eller, J. Ben, Greensboro, 709 

Asheboro St. 
Ellington, R. P., Graham 
Elliott, Y. C. Clayton 
Ellis, C. G., Maiden 
Ellis, Hugh A., Wilson 
Ennis, L. R., Farmville 
Epley, L. N., Forest City 
Erwin, T. E., Canton, R. 2 
Eubanks, M. E., Jacksonville 
Evans, L. R., Knightdale 
Everett, J. R., Washington 
Farmer, J. S., Raleigh 



Farmer, R. E., Clear Branch, 

Tenn. 
Farmer, T. A., Lansing 
Farthing, E. J.. Sugar Grove 
Feezor, Forrest C, Raleigh 
Ferguson, Forest, Clyde, R. 1 
Fiddler, F. L., Winston-Salem, 

R. 1 
Fisher, Charles L., Salisbury 
Fisher. V. C, Marshall. R. 2 
Fitzgerald, W. H.. Cherokee 
Flack, O. R.. Bostic 
Fleischmann. A. W., Greenville 
Fletcher, Phillip, Sherwood 
Fletcher, R. D., Mount Airy 
Fleming, J. M», Lumberton, R. 5 
Fleming, W., Mars Hill 
Flowers, W. H, Valdese 
Flowe. Thos. B., Concord, R. 1, 

Box 7S6 
Fogleman, T. W., Albemarle 
Ford. Howard J.. Wake Forest 
Forsyth, Paul, Ridgecrest 
Fortner, S. J., Fletcher 
Foster, R. C, Warsaw 
Fountain, R. S., Weldon 
Fox, J. W.. Lenoir, R. 2 
Francis, W. C, Wake Forest 
Frederick, J. V., West Gastonia 
Freeman, John. Almond 
Freeman, L. E. M„ Raleigh, R. 3 
Friday. C. F.. Taylorsville 
Frye, F. W., Landis 
Fulghum, J. H, Mocksville 
Fulk, A. Lincoln, High Point 
Gaddy, J. F., Salisbury, R. 4 
Gaines, Louis S., Lexington 
Gantt, M. D.. Swannanoa 
Garland, Roy, Stecoah 
Gardner, E. N., Dunn 
Gardner. R. A., Madison 
Garner, John U., Greensboro, 

Denim Station 
Garner, W. E., Randleman 
Garrett, F. B., Havesville 



252 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Gattis, E. H., Raleigh 
Gehring, B. F., Biltmore 
George, Esiah, Whittier 
Gillespie, C. L., Smithfield 
Gillespie. J. C, Reidsville, R. 2 
Gilley, J. A„ Thurman 
Gilley, William, Blowing Rock 
Glosson, S. C, Moncure 
Godwin, L. E., Four Oaks 
Goforth, J. W., Ravensford 
Goforth, Walter, Joe 
Golden, Joe. Proctor 
Gold, W. M., Ellenboro, R. 3 
Goode, W. E., Scotland Neck 
Goodwin, H. F., Monroe 
Gordon, M. W., Spencer 
Gordon, R. R., Pittsboro 
Gouge, J. A., Wing 
Gough, W. H., Shoals 
Gragg, E. M., Shull's Mills 
Graham, W. H., Culberson 
Grant, D. B., Cheraw, S. C. 
Green, J. H„ Warne 
Green. J. L., Deep Gap 
Green, J. R., Drexel 
Green, R. W., Green's Creek 
Green, D. A., Clarissa 
Green, Tipton, Boone 
Green, V. W., Cranberry 
Green, Walter C, Boone 
Greenway, Troy, Bakersville 
Greer, G. D., Tuxedo 
Greer, R. G., Summitt 
Gresham, N. E., Tarboro 
Grice, J. B., West Asheville 
Griffin, Gaston. Bryson City 
Griffin, X. H., Big Laurel 
Griffin, R. A.. Mount Airy 
Griggs, W. L„ Charlotte 
Grigg, W. R., Marion 
Grogan, C. C, Union Mill 
Grubb, G. G, Durham 
Guice, J. B., Hendersonville 
Gupton, B .L„ Pittsboro, R. 2 
Guthrie, W. B.. Chocowinity 



Guy, T. Sloan, Carthage 
Gwaltney, R. C„ Winston-Salem 
Haas, L. P., Granite Falls 
Habel, S. T„ Jr., Enfield 
Haga, K. L., Newland 
Hagler, O. J., Black Mountain 
Hale, A. S., Henderson 
Hall, Howard, Hayesville 
Hall, J. H., Mount Airy 
Hall, R. F„ Fuquay Springs 
Hall, R. J.. Bladenboro 
Hall. W. G.. East Durham 
Hamby, A. C, Mebane 
Hamby, R. P., Shelby 
Hammonds, S. A.. Lumberton, 

R. 2 
Hamrick, John, Weeksville 
Hancock, W. F., Hemp 
Hanes, J. H.. Belews Creek 
Haney, M. B., Busick 
Hardaway, R. E., Lenoir 
Hardin, E. F., Lincolnton 
Hardwick, O. E., Hammond, S. C. 
Hare, Frank, Jonesboro 
Harmon, E. M., Vilas 
Harper, J. H., Louisburg, R. 2 
Harrell, E. J., Red Oak 
Harrell, I. S., South Mills 
Harrell, V. H., Winston-Salem, 

1704 Green St. 
Harrelson, A. D., Loris, S. C. 
Harrelson, W. A. C, Loris, S. C. 



Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 



ngton, W. B., Williamstou 

s, C. L., Mount Airy 

s, D. P., Louisburg 

s, E. M., Aberdeen 

s, E. R., Virgilina, Va. 

s, John, Argura 

s, J. P., Maysville 

s, J. S., Concord 

s, L. B., Mooresboro, R. 1 

s, M. I., Valdese 

s, Ralph. Albemarle 

s, Reid, Albemarle 

son, A. L., Mount Airv 



Annual of Session 1935 



253 



Hartsell, Paul, Brevard 
Hartsell. P. P., Durham 
Hathcock, A. A., Concord 
Hately, Jas. H., Mount Airy 
Hatley, S. A., Clarendon 
Hauser, O. H., Westfield 
Hawkins, F. C, Statesville 
Hayes, A. B., Hays 
Hayes, C. C, Ladonia 
Hayes, J. E., North Wilkesboro 
Hayes, Noah, North Wilkesboro 
Haynes, Grady E., Concord 
Haytin, W. M„ Maxton 
Haywood, Oscar, New Bern 
Headden, W. A., Murphy 
Hearne, T. W., Rockingham 
Heath, R. E., Steeds 
Hedgepeth, I. P.. Lumberton 
Helms, D. F., Indian Trail 
Helton, R. A., Culberson 
Henderson, C. H., Dover, R. 2 
Hendricks, G. A., Nashville 
Hendrix. Raymond, Boone 
Henline, J. H., Newland 
Hensley, B. S., Barnardsville 
Herring, A. C, Bladenboro 
Herring, R. H., Zebulon 
Hester, C. R., St. Paul's 
Hester, Paul, Durham 
Hester, T. M., Spindale 
Hickman, T. O., Williamston 
Hicks, A. M., Winston-Salem, R. 5 
Hicks, H. P., Canton, R. 2 
Hicks, J. P., Asheville 
Hicks, P. A., Belmont 
Hicks. P. C, Canton 
Hilemon. C. W., Cedar Mountain 
Hill, J. E., Marion 
Hill, J. W. P., Forest City, R. 1 
Hines. H. B., Manteo 
Hinson, J. S., Jonesville 
Hinton, C. R., Tabor City 
Hocutt, Geo. L., Matthews 
Hodge, Dewey, Rutherfordton, 
R. 2 



Hodges, E. C. Boone 
Hodges, J. L., New Bern 
Hoffman, W. Arthur, West Gas- 

tonia. Box 2547 
Hogue, H. J., Wesser 
Holbert, J. C, Saluda 
Holden, N. E., Lauada 
Holland, C. C, Taylorsville 
Hollingsworth, C. B., Penrose, R. 1 
Hollis, A. N., Greensboro, Revolu- 
tion Branch 
Holloman, J. C, Marion, S. C. 
Hollowell, W. H., Windsor, R. 1 
Holmes, W. B., Monroe 
Holtsclaw, Dewey, Elk Park 
Holtzclaw, W. P., Etowah 
Honeycutt, R. N„ Salisbury, R. 7 
Hooper, D. C, Speedwell 
Hooper, M. L., East La Porte 
Hopkins, J. S., Greensboro 
Hopkins, W. B., China Grove 
Home, C. B., Roseboro 
Home, G. P., Rutherfordton 
Home, W. B., Kings Mountain 
Hough, J. C, Kinston, Kennedy 

Home 
Hough, W. A., New London 
Hovis, R. W., King, R. 1 
Howard, A. T., Landrum, S. C, 

R. 3 
Howard, Charles B., Buie's Creek 
Howell, Lee, Husk 
Hoyle, J. E., Whitakers 
Hudson, C. F., West Durham 
Hudson, E. V., Cramerton 
Hudson, J. A., Gastonia, Pinkney 

Station 
Hudson, S. F., Red Springs 
Huffman, J. G., Parsonville 
Huggins, A., Shallotte 
Huggins, F. M., Belmont 
Huggins, Hubert, Dallas 
Hughes, J. G., Valley 
Huneycutt, C. C, Stanfield 
Huneycutt, R. N., Salisbury, R. 4 



254 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Hunnicutt, J. A., Cliffside 

Hunt, G. R., Chadbourn, 

Hunt, Howard, Denton 

Hunt, J. E., Lumberton, R. 3 

Hunt, W. G., Lumberton, R. 3 

Huntley, David, Fairview 

Huntley, M. M., Rutherfordton 

Huntley, S. F., Hendersonville 

Huntley, William C, Bear Wallow 

Hutchins, C. C, Mount Airy 

Hutchins, W. Wilbar, High Point 

Hutchinson, E. J., Wadesboro 

Hux, M. L., Greensboro, R. 5 

Hyatt, J. L., Whittier 

Ingle, E. J.j Bakersville 

Israel, F. L., Danville, Va., R. 4 

Ives, D. H., Spray 

Ivester, Seth, Lawndale 

Ivey, Jas. A., West Asheville, 

23 Balsam St. 
Jackson, I. B., Warrenton 
Jackson, R. R., Harrellsville 
Jacobs, L. W., Pembroke 
James, Lee, Taylorsville, R. 2 
James, W. C, Mount Airy 
James, W. H., Kannapolis, Box 546 
Jamison, Ernest, Sylva 
Jarvis, N. T., Roaring River 
Jenkins, E. B., Rutherfordton 
Jenkins, J. L., Boiling Springs 
Jenkins, P. H., Tuskeegee 
Jennings, S. S., North Wilkesboro 
•Johnson, E. M., Minneapolis 
Johnson, E. N., Mount Olive 
Johnson, Jennings, Greensboro, 902 

Wharton St. 
Johnson, J. J., Belhaven 
Johnson, Walter L., Mount Airy 
Johnson, J. S., Cedar Creek 
Johnson, L. L., Magnolia 
Johnson, M. M., Selma 
Johnson, T. C, Kinston 
Johnson, Walt N., Mars Hill 

(Winter Address, Malbourne 
Hotel, Durham) 



Johnson, W. O., Taylorsville, R. 2 
Johnson, W. O., St. Paul's 
Johnson, W. S., Burlington, R. 5 
Johnston, C. R., Concord, R. 1 
Jollay, Charles, Durham, R. 6 
Jones, A. W. H., Severn 
Jones, Clarence, Newell 
Jones, Grady, Postell 
Jones, H. B., Lincolnton 
Jones, J. L., Wilmington 
Jones, J. M., Loris, S. C. 
Jones, J. W'., Caroleen 
Jones, O. M., Raleigh 
Jones, Troy, Wade 
Jones, W. J., Salemburg 
Jones, W. S., Shelby, R. 4 
Jones, W. W., Charlotte, 1409 

Allen St. 
Jordan, E. G, Elkin 
Jordan, J. R., Star 
Joyce, J. A., Sandy Ridge, R. 1 
Joyner, A. V., Canton 
Joyner, N. S., Waxhaw, R. 2 
Justice, J. M., Hendersonville 
Keaton, T. C, Winston- Salem, 

1418 E. 25th St. 
Keels, L. J., Tryon 
Keller, E. C, Dunn 
Keller, Jack R., Hickory 
Keller, L. N., Fleetwood 
Keller, O. A., Jonesboro 
Keller, Sam, Banner Elk 
Kelly, R. A., Belmont 
Kelly, W. M., Wilmington 
Kendrick, R. D., Durham, 921 

Fifth St. 
Kersey, W. O., Burlington 
Kester, J. M., Wilmington 
Kesterson, J. W., Horse Shoe 
Key, H. R., Mount Airy 
Kidd, J. C, Bennett 
Kidd, Roland, Bennett, R. 2 
Kilpatrick, A. F., Candler 
Kilpatrick, J. B., Balsam Grove 
Kincheloe, J. W., Rocky Mount 



Annual of Session 1935 



255 



King, Bascomb, Steeds 
King, T. H., Clinton 
Kinnett, A. D., Burlington 
Kirk, J. E., Roanoke Rapids 
Kirk, J. T., Halifax 
Kirstein, M. L., Fletcher 
Kiser, W. R., Concord 
Knight, Ira D. S., Durham 
Knight, Luther, Hartsville, S. C. 
Knott, J. L., Rural Hall 
Kolb, E. C, Windsor 
Lamb, S. N., Whiteville 
Lambert, H. F., Statesville 
Lambert, Jesse, Ravensford 
Laney, W. C, Brookford 
Lanier, Hardy, Stedman 
Lanier, J. E., Wallace 
Lanier, R. C, Mount Airy 
Lanning, T. D., Leicester 
Laskey, J. H., Marietta, S. C. 
Lawing, E. R., Nebo 
Lawrence, T. S., Chadbourn 
Lawrence, W. F., Union Grove 
Leatherwood, F. H., Waynesville 
Ledford, R. F., Blairsville, Ga. 
Lee, Bud, Nantahala 
Lee, L. C, Durham 
Leggett, Geo. D., Windsor 
Lewis, M. L., Dana 
Lindsey, E. B., Bryson City, R. 1 
Lineberger, C. A., Alexis 
Liner, G. H., High Point 
Link, John R., Belcross 
Linney, W. E., Wilkesboro 
Little, C. S., Peachland, R. 1 
Little, C. Ray, Polkton, Box 166 
Little, I. B., Marshville 
Little, James B., Marshville 
Little, Luther, Charlotte 
Lizenby, J. T., Troy 
Lloyd, Richard, Jackson 
Lockee, A. A., Lincolnton 
Locklear, C. E., Pembroke 
Locklear, D. D., Laurinburg, R. 5 
Locklear, P. P., Lumberton 



Locklear, Purcell, Pembroke 
London, J. Troy, Reidsville, R. 5 
Long, E. A,. Germanton 
Long, Raymond, Charlotte, R. 5 
Lossie, Jonas, Whittier 
Loudermilk, Carl, Isabella, Tenn. 
Love, Hoyle, High Point 
Lowe, C. G., Rocky Mount. R. 3 
Lovingood, R. P., Marble 
Lowe, W. E., Shelby, R. 2 
Lowder, D. H., Salisbury 
Lucas, R. H., Plymouth 
Luck, W. S., Winston-Salem, 

Eaton St. 
Luffman, J. H., Elkin 
Lunsford, M. C, Pembroke 
Lunsford, T. W., West Asheville 
Lynch, J. W., Wake Forest 
Lynch, W. C, Rutherfordton, R. 3 
Lynes, W. W., Lenoir 
Lyon, T. M., Trap Hill 
McCall, A. C, Durham, R. 3 
McCall, C. S., Lake Toxoway 
McCann, Levi, Roaring River 
McCarter, Jesse, Wake Forest 
McCarter, W. P., Mocksville 
McClure, L. A., Alexis 
McCulloch, Roy R., Oxford 
McDaniel, E. L., Mooresboro 
McDuffie, J. F., Chapel Hill 
McElreath, F. M., Leicester, R. 2 
McFalls, W. T., Candler, R. 2 
McFee, C. B., Brevard 
McGee, W. K., Thomasville 
McGill, J. I.. Wadesboro 
McGregor, J. C, Jalong 
McGuire, V. V., Swannanoa 
Mclver, J. A., Greenville 
McKaughan, J. A., Winston- 
Salem, 1836 Buena Vista Road 
McKnight, C. H., Whitehead 
McLeod, J. A., Mars Hill 
McMahan, P. L., Micaville 
McMahan, W. F., Nebo 
McManus, O. W., Gibson 



256 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



McMillan, J. A., Thomasville 
McSwain, W. L., Harmony 
Mace, H. H., Hendersonville, R. 4 
Mace, R. G.. Clyde 
Maddry, Chas. A., Spindale 
Maness, O. T., Spies 
Manly, A. J., Rosman 
Mann, Marvin T., Canton, R. 2 
Manuel, J. F., Germanton, R. 2 
Manuel, M, E., Winston-Salem, 

E. 16th St. 
Marion, L. G, Crutchfield 
Marler, J. D., Wingate 
Marr, L. N., Turtletown, Tenn. 
Marr, W. W., Hickory 
Marshall, J. J., Macon 
Marshall, O. N., Rocky Mount 
Marshburn, R. F., Salemburg 
Martin, C. F., Murphy, R. 2 
Martin, C. V., Shelby 
Martin, G. A., Sparta 
Martin, J. L., Pineola 
Martin, S. H., Young Harris, Ga. 
Mason, J. P., Hendersonville 
Mason, B. K., Winston-Salem, 

Box 2030 
Matthewson, Butler, Topton 
Matthews, Luther J., Wallburg 
Maynor, Chesley, Red Springs 
Maynor, L. A., Buie 
May, G. W., Louisburg, R. 2 
.Mayberry, R. F., Sylva 
Meadows, A. F., Rainbow Springs 
Mecum, C. C, Whitnel 
Mehaffey, R. R., Leicester 
Meigs, J. C, Pageland, S. C. 
Melton, A. G., Boiling Springs 
Melton, E. L., Mount Pleasant 
Melton, N. A., Hendersonville 
Melton, R. G., Forest City 
Melton, Sterling, Sylva 
Memory, J. I., Wake Forest 
Mercer, I. M., Raleigh 
Messer, K. W., Clyde 
Miller, Ed O., North Wilkesboro 



Miller, H. O., High Point 

Miller, H. R., Littleton 

Miller, J. R., Raeford 

Mills, G. T., Apex, R. 3 

Millsaps, J. C, Dorsey 

Minton, B. L., Congo 

Mintz, M. L., Swansboro 

Mintz, S. I., Leland 

Mitchell, B. A., Corapeaks 

Monds, R. S., Columbia 

Moore, G. C, Nashville, R. 2 

Moore, J. W'., Gilreath 

Moore, W. H., Wadesboro 

Moose, J. D., Charlotte, Chadwick 

Station 
Moretz, A. E., Boone 
Morgan, J. Andrew, Cary 
Morgan, J. W., Beaufort 
Morgan, R. C, Bessie 
Morgan, Ralph, Mars Hill 
Morgan, S. L., Creedmoor 
Morris, B. E., Durham 
Morris, Roy A., Carrboro 
Morton, S. F., Winston-Salem, 

132 N. Spring St. 
Moss, J. F., Kings Mountain 
Motley, Gerald E., Wake Forest 
Mull, J. 0„ Vale 
Muckle, Coy, Wingate 
Mumford, E. F., High Point, R. 1 
Munn, Lonnie D., Badin 
Murray, J. G., Sylva 
Murray, J. T., Winston-Salem, 

Chatham Heights 
Murray, L. B., State Road 
Mustian, A. P., Colerain 
Myers, C. H., Mooresville 
Naff, S. L., Winston-Salem, 239 

Glenn Ave. 
Nail, L. A., Elon College 
Nanney, B. T., Swiss 
Neilson, J. A., Thomasville 
Nelson, E. R., Henderson 
Newman, Leslie, Bethel 
Newton, Dewev, Casar 



Annual of Session 1935 



257 



Newton, I. T., Whiteville 

Nichols, H. L., Durham, R. 6 

Nix, J. O., Satolah, Ga. 

Nobles, J. W., Bailey 

Norman, E. C, East Bend 

Norris, C. H., Wake Forest 

Norville, C. S., Durham 

Nuckols, R. O., Colfax, R. 1 

Oates, C. M., Greensboro, Revolu- 
tion Branch 

Oates, D. E., High Point, R. 4 

O'Brian, L. R., Asheboro 

O'Hara, J. W., Candler 

Oldham, S. W., Wendell 

Olive, Eugene I., North Wilkes- 
boro 

O'Kelly, H. A., Greenville, S. C. 

Osteen, J. E., Hendersonville 

Otter, Andrew, Whittier 

Ousley, Carl, Zebulon 

Ousley, J. W., Wake Forest 

Overby, D. W., Reidsville 

Owen, J. C, Spruce Pine 

Owen, J. R., Asheville 

Owensby, J. W., Flat Rock, R. 1 

Padgett, Chas. H., Bostic, R. 2 

Padgett, Rush, Grover 

Page, B. R., Southport 

Page, J. M., Raleigh 

Page, W. P., Burgaw 

Pardue, R. J., Jonesville 

Parham, E. T., Charlotte 

Parham, Otto, West Asheville 

Parker, B. H., Icard 

Parker, C. C, Marion 

Parker, C. E., Winston-Salem, 
R. 1 

Parker, G. M., Tuckaseigee 

Parker, W. W., Cowarts 

Parks, B. P., Shelby, Box 845 

Parks, Pervis C, Cycle 

Parrish, A. D., Zebulon 

Parris, T. H., Henrietta 

Pate, E. W., Wilmington 

Paul, E. A., Lumberton 



Payne, J. B., Whitnel 

Payne, T. E., Marion 

Payne, W. C, Blowing Rock 

Peacock, J. L., Tarboro 

Pearce, J. L., Shikoh 

Pearson, S. B., Waynesville, R. 2 

Peek, Wayne, Mars Hill 

Peeler, B. F., Taylorsville 

Peeler, M. F., Taylorsville 

Pegg, Fred, Alexander 

Pegram, C. M., Fair Bluff 

Penry, H. T., Southmont 

Phillips, A. T., Dalton 

Phillips, C. E., Dallas 

Phillips, Grover C, Altamahaw 

Phillips, J. H., Lincolnton 

Phillips, M. B., Mount Airy 

Phillips, N. B., East Flat Rock 

Pickler, J. M., Albemarle 

Pipes, J. C, Asheville, R. 1 

Pippin, A. A., Zebulon 

Pittard, C. R., Apex 

Plemmons, Erskine, Marshall, R. 1 

Plybon, C. T., Forest City 

Poe, W. D„ Oxford 

Ponder, R. D., Buckner 

Pool, W. H., Fayetteville, 810 

Branson St. 
Porter, A. H, Bonlee 
Poteat, E. McNeill, Jr., Raleigh 
Potter, F. P., Supply 
Potts, E. H, Elizabeth City 
Powell, R. E., Burnsville 
Powers, J. L., Elkin 
Powers, J. L., Beulaville 
Preslar, M. D. L., Wingate 
Prevatt, F. A., Lumberton, R. 2 
Price, Gordon L., Roanoke Rapids 
Price, J. Louis, Siler City 
Price, W. S., Brevard 
Pridgen, W. D., Bladenboro 
Privette, G. W., Roaring River 
Pruitt, J. C, North Wilkesboro 
Pugh, R. L., New Bern 
Queen, A. C, Webster 



258 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Quinton, Jas. D,. Asheville, R. 1 
Quisenberry, J. R., Wake Forest 
Rainey, L. J., Durham 
Rasberry, R. J., Hallsboro 
Ray, Willie, Faust 
Ray, Z. G., Ash 
Reavis, L. B., Louisburg 
Reavis, M. F., Yadkinville 
Redwine, Richard K., Hickory 
Reece, D. G., Jennings 
Reece, C. C., Brevard 
Reese, Ben, Vest 
Reese, Cecil, Marshall, R. 3 
Reese, Paul, Marion 
Reese, W. C, Marshal 
Reid, C. B., Albemarle 
Reid, W. C, Sylva 
Renegar, G. D., Harmony, R. 2 
Rennell, F. A., Taylorsville, R. 2 
Reynolds, R. T., Canton, R. 3 
Rhyne, C. A., Salisbury 
Rhyne, M. P., Dallas 
Riddick, J. T., Durham 
Riggs, O. L., Durham 
Rimmer, W. W., Cornelius 
Roach, E. C, Lexington, R. 3 
Roach, J. F., Norlina 
Roach, T. H., Lincolnton, R. 3 
Robbins, Edd D., Blowing Rock 
Roberson, W. B., Marshall, R. 2 
Roberts, David, Caroleen 
Roberts, Eugene, Goldsboro 
Roberts, Lawrence, Shelby 
Robinson, D. J., Winton 
Rogers, B. N., Fletcher 
Rogers, C. F., Andrews 
Rogers, W. S., Robbinsville 
Ross, M. L„ Concord, R. 6 
Rosser, W. 0„ Smithfield, R. 1 
Rotan, Z. W., New London, R. 6 
Rouse, C. A., Kinston, R. 4 
Royal, C. N., High Point 
Ruffin, C. E., Ellerbe 
Russell, W. G., Richfield 
Russell, W. J., Whiteville 



Sampson, W. J., Lumberton 
Sams, O. E., Mars Hill • 

Sargeant, A. G, Kings Mountain 
Sasser, Lonnie, Aulander 
Sasser, T. L., Reidsville 
Satterfield, R. H., Wilmington 
Saunders, J. H., Reidsville 
Sawyer, J. E., Pembroke 
Scofield, F. H„ Wake Forest 
Scott, A. R., Winston-Salem, R. 1 
Seefeldt, H. C, Shelby 
Sentell, R. E., Southport 
Sessoms, J. B., Erwin 
Sexton, E. C„ Rocky Mount 
Sexton, E. Z., Lansing 
Seymour, J. A., Concord, Franklin 

Ave. 
Seymour, T. Y., Pittsboro 
Shearin, K. C, Murphy 
Shelton, R. H., Ramseytown 
Shepherd, N. H., Greensboro 
Shew, T. R., North Wilkesboro, 

R. 1 
Shoe, E. C, Robersonville 
Shoemaker, A. Z., Madison, R. 3 
Shoemaker, T. P., Lenoir 
Shook, Frank, Bryson City 
Shope, B. F., Yellow Creek 
Shore, R. H., Blowing Rock 
Shu ford, S. W., Celo 
Short, R. G., Newton 
Silvers, J. S., Lenoir, R. 4 
Simmons, W. V., Ash 
Simms, E. T., Winston-Salem, 114 

Brookstown Ave. 
Sinclair, Joe, Forest City 
Sinclair, W. F., Robbinsville 
Singletary, G. M., Whiteville 
Smart, D. M., Forest City 
Smith, A. J., Goldsboro 
Smith, C. S., Lumberton, Box 1047 
Smith, Dean, Union Mills 
Smith, Ernest, Wingate 
Smith, Jas. H., Williamston 
Smith, J. M., Rockingham 



Annual of Session 1935 



259 



Smith, J. T., Wcstfield 

Smith, L. P., Winston-Salem, 420 

Dunleith Ave. 
Smith, M. D., Mooresville 
Smith, R. L., High Point 
Smith, R. L., Old Fort 
Smith, Sibbold, Patrick 
Smoak, E. L., Rural Hall 
Snipes, L. E., Morganton, R. 1 
Snipes, M. V., Nebo 
Snow, J. A., Wingate 
Snyder, E. C, Monroe 
Snyder, G. C, Sylva, R. 1 
Snyder, Joel S., Fayetteville 
Soles, A. R., Tabor City 
Solesbee, A. S., Franklin, R. 4 
Solomon, F. D., Carthage 
Southers, H. L., Pisgah Forest 
Sparks, L. E., Moxley 
Spell, T. R., Roseboro 
Spencer, J. O., Grassy Creek 
Spilman, B. W., Kinston, R. 2 
Sprinkle, A. P., West Asheville 
Sprinkle, E. F., Alexander, R. 2 
Sprinkle, W. B„ Marshallberg 
Stafford, I. K., Asheville 
Staley, T. E„ Albemarle 
Stallings, H. W., Albemarle 
Stallings, T. C, Concord 
Stanberry, J. S., Almond 
Stancil, J. N., Zebulon 
Stancil, W. D„ Kenly, R. 1 
Stan field, C H., Corbett 
Stankwytch, R. A., Lumberton, 

R. 6 
Stanley, D. B., Wilmington 
Stanley, H. R., Dobson 
Starling, H. R„ Wake Forest 
Starnes, Nene, Asheville, 851 Hay- 
wood Road 
Stegall, J. Frank, Pollocksville 
Stephens, A. P., Morehead City 
Stephens, G. Van, Oxford 
Stephens, W. R., Calypso 
Stepp, Neil, Bryson City 



Stevens, Chas. E., Morven 
Stevens, Chas. H., Winston-Salem, 

432 S. Broad St. 
Stevenson, J. S., Taylorsville 
Stewart, E. R., Fairfield 
Stike, C. L., White Top, Va. 
Stiles, Fred, Murphy, R. 2 
Stimson, J. F., Southern Pines 
Stoudemire. A. T., Cooleemee 
Street, J. L., Belwood 
Strickland, B. M., Chesnee, S. C. 
Strickland, C. M., Greensboro, 64 

Walnut St. 
Strickland, H. S., Wilmington 
Stringfield, P. C, Mars Hill 
Stroup, H. M., Ramseur 
Stroupe, S. A., Catawba, R. 2 
Stroupe, S. M., Alexis 
Sullivan, C. E., Woodsdale 
Sullivan, E. F., Hickory 
Sullivan, J. A., Wilmington 
Summers, E. S., Concord 
Summey, M. C, Rosman 
Surratt, R. R., Thomasville 
Suttle, J. W., Shelby 
Swaim, V. M., Winston-Salem, 

2106 S. Main St. 
Swann, S. G., Statesville, R. 1 
Swanson, W. F., Pilot Mountain 
Swiney, G. W., Burlington 
Tarlton, W. V., Rich Square 
Tate, L. R., Statesville, R. 6 
Taylor, C. L., Ellenboro 
Taylor, C. R., Burgaw 
Taylor, E. C, Red Springs 
Taylor, J. Ned, Winston-Salem 
Teague, C. W., Wake Forest 
Teague, E. N., Fayetteville, 

210 B St. 
Teague, C. W., Selma, R. 1 
Teague, G. G, Granite Falls 
Teague, J. L., Hickory, R. 2 
Teague, J. U., Henderson 
Teague, N. C, Winston-Salem, 

129 E. Devonshire St. 



260 



N. C. Baptist State Convention' 



Teel, Z. B., East Durham 
Thomas, J. C, Micaville 
Thomas, LeRoy A., Rhodhiss 
Thompson, N. A., Jr., Draper 
Thompson, Troy M., Old Dock 
Threatt, T., Kinston, R. 2 
Tillett, G. V., Morganton 
Tillman, O. G., Gary 
Tillman, W. S, Sport 
Tilson, Tom, Shookville 
Todd, J. K., Clarendon 
Todd, L. L., Mollie 
Todd, N. J, Roxboro. R. 2 
Tomlinson, Audrey S., Laurinburg 
Townsend, Carl M., Raleigh, 

319 [Morrison Ave. 
Townsend, B., Rockfish 
Trammel, C. B., Columbus 
Triplett, Carl, Blowing Rock- 
Tripp, R. E., Nashville 
Trivett, G. L., West Jefferson 
Trivett. J. R., Mabel 
Trueblood, C. H., Seaboard 
Truett, James L., Andrews 
Truett, W. T., Culberson 
Tucker, George A., Pilot Moun- 
tain, R. 3 
Tucker, J. Powell, Raleigh 
Turbyville, W. M., Clarissa 
Turner, C. K., North Asheville 
Turner, E. W., Mocksville, R. 3 
Turner, G. S., Erwin 
Turner, J. Clyde, Greensboro 
Tyner, Roy, Pembroke 
Tyson, Joel S., Kannapolis 
Underwood, J. L., Hayesville 
Underwood, P. A., Kannapolis 
Upchurch, C. A., Raleigh 
Upchurch, H. C, Cary 
Upchurch, P. B., Apex 
Usry, E. G, Oxford 
Usry, J. B., Oxford 
Ussery, L. D., Mount Gilead 
Vann, L. R., Spruce Pine 
Vann, R. T., Raleigh 



Vaughn, R. B., Marshall 
Vause, Chas. B., Troy 
Vehaun, W. S., Asheville, 

40 Biltmore Ave. 
Vestel, I. W., Jonesville 
Vinson, J. L, Dillard, Ga. 
VonMiller, R. M., Wilson 
Voyles, Clarence A., Birch 
Waldrop, H. E.. Shelby 
Walker, A. A., Greensboro, 

Bessemer Branch 
Walker, F. G, Castalia 
Walker, W. H., Morganton, R. 1 
Wall, R. E., Sanford 
Wall, Zeno, Shelby 
Walters, R. E., Cherokee Falls, 

S. C. 
Walters, T. E., Rocky Mount 
Walters, W. L., Gastonia 
Walton, J. O., Windsor 
Ward, O. E., Winston-Salem, R. 2 
Warfford, Walter L., Lexington, 

Box 122 
Warren, John F., Wilmington 
Washburn, D. G., Shelby, R. 4 
Watkins, John, Bryson City 
Watson, Thomas, Buck 
Watts, A. E., Taylorsville 
Watts, F. C, Purlear 
Watts, J. N., Mars Hill 
Watts, S. I., Boomer 
Wayland, John T., Monroe 
Weatherman, John L., Jonesville 
Weatherman, W. F., Jonesville 
Weaver, R. H., Bonlee 
Welch, C. C, Stiles 
Welchel, S. E., Avondale 
Weldon, Seldon, Mount Airy 
Wells, E. L., Edenton 
Wescott, W. C, Wilmington, 

R. 2, Box IS 
Wesson, D. C, McAdenville 
West, Algia, Marble 
West, R. W., Andrews, R. 1 
West, W. F., Roxboro 



Annual of Session 1935 



261 



West, Weldon, Andrews 
Weston, L. U., Huntersville 
Wheeler, C. C, Merry Oaks 
Whisenhunt, Eph, Elkin 
Whitaker, H. C, Andrews 
Whitaker, J. M., Johnson City, 

Tenn. 
White, E. P., Rutherfordton, R. 3 
White, G. D., Statesville. R. 5 
Whiten, G. V., Winston-Salem 
Whitley, B. G. ; Greensboro, R. 5 
Whitley, J. W., Gastonia 
Whittington W. T., West Jeffer- 
son 
Wilcox, B. F., Blowing Rock 
Wilcox, D. H., Winston-Salem, 

830 W. Fifth St. 
Williams, Gardner, Tapoco 
Williams, L. R., Maiden 
Williams, T. H., Magnolia 
Williams, Wm. Harrison, 

Charlotte 
Williams, W. W., Oteen 
Williax. Edwards, Andrews 
Willis, E. G., Nashville, R. 2 
Willis, Garland, Bryson City 
Willis, J. B., Hamlet 
Willis, R. T.. Jr., Oriental 
Willoughby, J. A., Ahoskie 



Wilson, J. B., Chesnee, S. C, R. 3 
Wilson, J. H., Bryson City 
Wilson, Ralph A., Burlington, R. 2 
Wilson, S. B„ High Point, 

402 Barker St. 
Winkler, H. M., Todd 
Womack, Floyd, Sylva 
Womack, Fred G., Hickory 
Wood, A. B., Maxton 
Wood, Wyman E., Swannanoa 
Woodall, A. D., Conway, S. C. 
Woodall, W. F., Gatesville 
Woodard, J. M., Hazelwood 
Woodcock, Wilson W., Greensboro 
Woodruff, W. E., Mount Airy 
Woody, W. S., Spruce Pine 
Wooten, E. K., Cycle 
Worley, W. M., West Asheville 
Worrell, P. T., Yanceyville 
Wright, J. M., Jennings 
Wyatt, Emanuel, Waynesville 
Wyatt, R. L., Asheville 
Wyatt, W. K., Bostic, R. 2 
Yates, J. Clyde, Bessemer City 
Yonce, G. H., Kyle 
Young, C. S., Hillsboro, Box 303 
Young, F. L., Benson 
Younger, L. T., New Hope 



MINISTERS ORDAINED BUT NOT ACTIVE IN THE PASTORATE 
AT THE TIME OF PUBLICATION OF THIS VOLUME 



Absher, J. M., North Wilkesboro 
Adams, D. A., Hays 
Adams, J. H., Asheville 
Adams, J. J., Southport 
Adams, J. Z., Austin 
Adams, M. A., Rutherfordton 
Alderman, J. O., Chapel Hill 
Allen, C. L., Waybesville 
Allen, D. R, Canton 
Allen, P. A., Lenoir 
Allen, Turlon, Clayton 
Anderson, J. R., Wilkesboro 



Andrews, Ira E. D.. Clayton 
Annas, L. M., Pearland 
Anthony, W. W.. Whittier 
Arant, Norman, Dunn 
Arnold, J. N., Cullasaja 
Arrington, A. C, Waynesville 
Arrington, T. F., Waynesville 
Arrington, W. F., Julian 
Arrowood, John, Rutherfordton, 

R. 2 
Atkins, C. C, Ramseytown 
Avery, W. B., Winston- Salem 



262 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Baker, Jeta, Charlotte 

Baker, T. E., Winston-Salem 

Bacott, A. J., East Laurinburg 

Bailey, E. J.. Caroleen 

Ball, Kimsey, Marshall, R. 2 

Barber, P. S., Gastonia, Pinkeny 

Station 
Barker, B. H., Benham 
Barker, W. F., Grassy Creek 
Barnwell, Geo. L... Candler 
Bartlett, E. R., Asheville 
Barton, C. D., Greensboro 
Beam, J. M., Candor 
Beaver, J. T., Burnsville 
Beck, D„ Webster 
Beck, L. P., Badin 
Bennett, H. M., Apple Grove 
Bennett, S. C, Morganton, R. 1 
Betts, S. J., Raleigh 
Betts. J. D., Fuquay Springs 
Biles, H. C, Ellerbe 
Blackburn, Wiley, Jefferson 
Blackwell. A. F., Chesnee, S. C, 

R. 3 
Blalock, J. G., Wake Forest 
Blanchard, C. W. 
Blevins, J. A., Hays 
Blevins, J. C, Grassy Creek 
Blevins, J. J., Grassy Creek 
Blevins, L. W., Grassy Creek 
Bloxam, Percy, Salisbury 
Bow den, W. C, Rex 
•Bonds, C. R., Charlotte 
Boney, L. B., Durham 
Boyd, J. P., Morven 
Bradley, S. A., Weaverville 
Bradley, W. L., Etna 
Bradley, Weaver, West Asheville 
Bradshaw, E. Mastin, Hudson 
Branch, R. A., Lenoir 
Braswell, W. A., Montezuma 
Braun, M. L., Salisbury 
Bridges, J. D., Lattimore 
Bridges, Lee, Durham 
Brisson, W. M., Dublin 



Bristol, Powell, North Cove 
Britt, R. A., Bladenboro 
Brock, J. C, Winston-Salem, 

430 Sprague St. 
Brooks, Clinard, Morganton 
Brown, E. D., Hardin 
Brown, Denver, Candler 
Brown, James, Burlington 
Brown, W'illard, Selma 
Brown, W. T., Shelby 
Bryson, A. C, Balsam 
Buchanan, Charlie, Minpro 
Buchanan, J. O., Webster 
Buck, P. D., Wilmington 
Bumgarner, Alpha, Hudson 
Bumgarner, A. P., West Gastonia 
Bumgarner, Frank, Grinshaw 
Burcham, John, Trap Hill 
Burkett, R. M., Jefferson 
Burleson, Raymond, Estatoe 
Burns, J. R., Drexel 
Butler, A. L„ Honeycutt 
Byrum, W. J., Asheboro 
Call. C. M., Wilkesboro 
Calloway, Green, Franklin, R. 4 
Campbell. J. A., Jefferson 
Campbell, W. C. Shelby 
Campbell, W. T., Clinton 
Carlton, W. F., Wilbar 
Carson, J. F., Sylva, R. 1 
Carson, W. T.. Franklin, R. 3 
Carter. A. D., Garland 
Carter, Thomas, Franklin, R. 4 
Gates. W. F., Randleman, R. 2 
Chamblee, E. C, Raleigh 
Chamblin, T. L., High Point 
Cheek. L. C, Chapel Hill 
Childress, Joseph, Weaversford 
Chronister, J. E.. Stanley 
Church, W. B., Finley 
Cloninger, J. L., Gastonia, R. 2 
Cockerham, T. J., Crumpler 
Coffey, A. T., Caroleen 
Cogdill, J. R.. Luck 
Coggin, A. J., Nashville 



Annual of Session 1935 



263 



Collins, E., Carthage 
Collins, F. T., Lumberton 
Collier, S. M., Charlotte 
Cook. R. L., Sylva. R. 1 
Cooper, W. F., Trap Hill 
Cope, C. M,, Crumpler 
Coram, R. P., Boonville 
Coren, Jndson, Brevard 
Coren, Judson, Brevard 
Cowan, R. D„ Green's Creek 
Cox, R. E., Durham 
Craig, W. B., Union Mills 
Crawford, D. T., Harris 
Crawford, Henry P., Wolf Moun- 
tain 
Crisp, J. H., Whitnel 
Crowder, W. P., Forest City 
Crutchfield, T. S., Albemarle 
Culbreth, H. C, Spindale 
Dailey, L. E., Buie's Creek 
Davenport, J. E. M., Pineville 
Davis, R. Lee, Statesville 
Dean, D. A., Balman 
Deaton, L. M., Greensboro, R. 5 
Deitz, R. N., Green's Creek 
DeLancey, J. C, Greensboro 
DeLoache, B. F., Gibsonville 
Dendy, F. E., Highlands 
Denton, Lincoln, Morganton, R. 4 
Denton, W. V., Nashville 
Devine, C. L., Connelly Springs 
DeVinney, J. V., Lawndale 
Dillard, E. B„ Union Mills 
Dodd, W. H„ Mocksville 
Dellinger, R. L., Sturgills 
Dotson, G. H., Bear Wallow 
Dotson, Roy, Boone 
Dowell, C. L., Wake Forest 
Driver, J. E., Lenoir 
Dry, C. C, Concord 
Dunnagan, W. E., Durham, R. 6 
Dyson, C. F., Nebo 
Edwards, C. E., Wake Forest 
Eldredge. Jack, Rosman 
Eller. Vernon. Purlear 



Elliott, J. S., Knottville 

Elliott, F. S., Cullowhee 

Elrod, J. M., Granite Falls 

English, W. R., Asheville 

Evans, C. R., Maggie 

Farington, B. H., Colfax 

Felts, N. M., Union Grove 

Finger, John, Maggie 

Finlator, W. D., Raleigh 

Fizer, J. R., Charlotte 

Foster, J. A., Call 

Foster, J. H., Wilmington 

Frost, G. E., Charlotte 

Fuquay, S. W., Eagle Springs 

Gambill, Arthur, Absher 

Garner, S. E., Asheville 

Gatewood, J. C, Trinity 

Gentry, J. H., West Jefferson 

Gilbert, J. W., Winston-Salem 

Gillespie, W. M., Rosman 

Gilliam, C. E., Old Fort 

Gladden, B. T.. High Point 

Glosson, Clyde, Greensboro 

Glenn, Clarence, Little Switzerland 

Glenn, W. H., Sugar Grove 

Golden, H. R., Altamahaw 

Gooch, E. D., Oxford, R. 1 

Goode, J. M., Boiling Springs 

Grant, J. H., Nantahala 

Green, A. J., Vilas 

Green, C. W., Marion 

Green, E. W., Henderson, R. 4 

Green, Levi, Deep Gap 

Green, Joe, Granite Falls 

Green, W. C, Boone 

Grice, E. S., Gastonia, Ranlo 

Station 
Griffin, W. M., Alexander 
Groce, J. H., Cana 
Grogan, P., Canton 
Gulledge, J. G., Marshville, R. I 
Guy, C. A., Whalev 
Gwyn, Gurney, Elk Park 
Gwyn, Hubert, East Bend 
Hagaman, J. P., Lenoir 



264 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Haigh, L. B., Salemburg 
Haire, P. H., Fleetwood 
Haislip, W. B., Winston-Salem 
Hall, J. F., Rosman 
Hall, Sam, Marshall R. 1 
Hallman, John A., Earl 
Hamby, Grady, Lenoir, R. 4 
Hamby, J. M., Bina 
Hampton, C. G., Asheville 
Hampton, N. L., Union Mills 
Hamon, S. E., Carthage 
Hargett, S. M., Rutherfordton 
Hargrove, B. H., Maggie 
Harrell, R. F.j Gastonia 
Harris, F. A., Norwood 
Harris, J. S., Concord 
Harris, L. W., Eldorado 
Hartsell, J. W'., Cameron 
Hartsell. P. B., Oakboro 
Hartsell, Roby, Brevard 
Hayes, A. C, Bunn Level 
Hayes, T. M., Nathan's Creek 
Haynes, Jesse, Joe 
Haynes, W. L., Forest City 
Heatherly, Ben, Cruso 
Hedgepeth, G. C, Morehead City 
Heilig, J. A., Concord 
Henderson, A. C, Winston-Salem 
Henderson, C. H, Mount Airy 
Henderson, J. K., Brevard 
Hensley, J. E., Celo 
Henry, B. G., Kannapolis 
Henson, A. C, Canton, R. 2 
Hester, B. F., Durham, R. 1 
Hice, W. H, Granite Falls 
Hickman, G. T., Winnabow 
Hicks, H. N, Winston-Salem 
Hicks, J. G., Kings Mountain 
Hicks, J. J., Kings Mountain, R. 2 
Hicks, T. C, Valley 
Hildebran, Julius, Hickory, R. 1 
Hilliard, J. M., High Point 
Hilliard, Otha, Fuquay Springs 
Hill, H. V., Trap Hill 
Hill, M. D., Marshville, R. 2 



Hill, M. P., Oakboro 
Hill, O. M., Boardman 
Hinson, Jasper, Fair Bluff 
Hodge, J. L., Rutherfordton, R. 2 
Hodges, J. L., Jr., New Bern 
Holden, F. H., Brevard 
Holloman, J. G, Peachland 
Holloman, W. A., Jonesville 
Holloway, L. M., Beulaville 
Holloway, Mace, Ramseytown 
Holtzclaw, W. J., Brevard 
Honeycutt, A. L., Linville 
Hopson, Ham, Valley 
Hough, W. C, Carthage 
Howard, G. N., Chapel Hill 
Howell, J. D., Whitakers 
Howell, J. G., Grassy Creek 
Howell, W. M., Asheville 
Hoxit, V. S., Wolf Mountain 
Hudson, Albert, Casar 
Hudson, L. L, Oxford 
Huffman, M. A., Icard 
Humphrey, D. B., Lumberton, R. 2 
Humphrey, H. B., Rockingham 
Humphrey, J. L., Lumberton, R. 2 
Huneycutt, G. A., Albemarle 
Hurley, W. L., Grassy Creek 
Hurst, W. T., Pittsboro 
Inman, Fred, Canton, R. 2 
Israel, R. J., Asheville 
Jamerson, A. Z., Burnsville, Rfd 
James, R. H., Marshville, R. 2 
Jamison, Thad, Sylva 
Jenks, L. D., Wake Forest 
Jennings, Charles, Franklin 
Jernigan, James, Mount Olive 
Johnson, E. O., St. Paul's 
Johnson, T. C, Whittier 
Johnson, W. L., Hamptonville 
Johnson, W. R., Wilmington 
Jolly, J. R., Jonesville 
Jones, Blane, Spindale 
Jones, F. T., Asheville 
Jones, J. O., Nebo 
Jones, Lee J., Marion 



Annual of Session 1935 



265 



Jones, T. A., Rutherfordton, R. 1 
Jordan, Alphonzo, Tyner 
Jordan, B. C, Roaring River 
Jumper, Ute, Robbinsville 
Justice, H. H., Marion 
King, T. C, Asheville 
Kirk, J. L., Mocksville 
Knotts, W. E., Wadesboro 
Kuykendall, R. M., Zirconia 
Kuykendall, I. N., East Flat Rock 
Kuykendall, W. L., Asheville, R. 1 
Lancaster, N. L., Gastonia 
Larkins, J. D., Wilmington 
Lassiter, A. G., Star 
Ledford, A. V., Gastonia 
Ledford, Lester, Prentiss 
Lennon, R. S., Delco 
Lewis, Carl, High Point 
Liner, H. G, Concord 
Liner, J. R., Charlotte 
Little, T. P., Marshville 
Livingston, E. A., Staley 
Long, E. A., Laurel Springs 
Long. J. A., Aulander 
Lyon. J. F., Trap Hill 
McAllister, T. G, Caroleen 
McCall, S. B., Lenoir 
McCloud, Spencer, Spear 
McCoy, D. C, Etna 
McCracken, R. P., Clyde, R. 1 
McFee, P ,T„ Hot Springs 
McGuire, J. C, Matney 
Mclntyre, Donald W„ Ellerbe 
Mclntyre, S. L., Oakboro 
Mclntyre, W. L., Asheville 
McKeithan, W. H., Southport 
Mann, J. C, Shull's Mills 
Marley, H. C, Old Fort 
Martin, W. N., Marshall, R. 1 
Massengale, J. C, Cowarts 
Matherly, W. H., Greensboro 
Mathis, A. S., Cycle 
Matthews, N. J., Pilot Mountain 
Mayberry, O. B., North Wilkes- 
boro 



May, S. S., Yadkinville 
Medford, A. T., Rainbow Springs 
Merrell, G L„ Gulf 
Metcalf, C. C, Weaverville 
Miller, D. C, Hays 
Miller, C L., Bluff 
Miller, R. A., New Bern 
Miller, T. C, Patterson 
Miller. V. L., Peachland 
Millican, C, Nakina 
Millican, E. B., Tabor City 
Mitchiner, J. F., Franklinton 
Mizzelle, J. C, Currie 
Moore, Eugene, Spring Creek 
Morgan, F. M., Marshall 
Morris, D. P., Norwood 
Morrison, W. M., Roaring River 
Mott, M. L., Jr., State Road 
Murray, J. F., Reidsville 
Myers, Gus, New Castle 
Myers, M., Winston-Salem 
Xash, C. H., Greensboro 
Neaves, J. M., Crumpler 
Nelson, J. H., Patterson 
New, C. H., Newland 
Nichols. L. L., Finley 
Norris, Lee, Whaley 
Nunnally, M. A., Marion 
Oakes, S. H., Rockingham 
O'Neill, G G, Rutherfordton 
Outlaw, A. H., Elizabeth City 
Owen, C. F., Canton 
Owen, Dillard, Rosman 
Owen, Dock, Rosman 
Owen, O. J., Wilson 
Owen, Wiley, Wolf Mountain 
Owen, Wm. Russell, Biltmore 
Paganstecker, B. H., Kings Moun- 
tain 
Painter, Roby, Balm 
Pardue, A. T., Roaring River 
Parker, G M., Tuckaseigee 
Parsons, C. C, Grassy Creek 
Parsons, Joe, Charlotte 
Passmore, P. H., Nantahala 



266 



N. C. Baptist State Convention" 



Pendergraph, Garland, Durham. 
R. 1 

Pendleton, E. P., Brevard 

Perry, H. J., Raleigh 

Phillips, H. L., Asheville 

Phillips, T. B., Charlotte, R. 3 

Philyow, Pink, Mortimer 

Plemmons, B. B., Luck 

Ponder, N. L., Penrose 

Potts, W. T., Highlands 

Powell, L. A., Drexel 

Powers, Arthur, Lansing 

Powers, Luther, Lansing 

Presley, W. W., Raleigh 

Prestwood, R. L., Hudson 

Price, B. H., Southport 

Price, John, Barnard 

Prince, E. A., Nantahala 

Privette, J. E., Union Grove 

Pruett, L. R., Charlotte 

Pruett, W. M., Waynesville 

Putnam, D. F., Shelby 

Pyatt, J. Sam, Nebo 

Queen, Cleve, Cowarts 

Queen, M. C, Argura 

Ranes, J. A., Rosman 

Rash, C. E., Alexander 

Ray, J. B., Roaring River 

Redmond, W. H., Kings Mountain 

Reese, B. B., Marion 

Reese, Wei ford, Marion 

Rhinehart, I. A., Clyde 

Rhyne, S. A., Erwin 

Richardson, W. C, Guilford 

Riggin, Joseph W., Vaughn 

Risner, Henry Clay, Winston- 
Salem 

Robbins, T. S., Stony Fork 

Roberson, E. A., Winston-Salem 

Roberson, J. P., Gilreath 

Robertson. C. H., Leaksville 

Roberts, E., Rutherfordton 

Roberts, Harry M., Kings Moun- 
tain 

Roberts, J. W., West Asheville 



Rodgers, Troy, Cullowhee 
Rouse, Marvin, Mocksville 
Rovve, P. H„ Winston-Salem 
Sasser, T. M., Albemarle 
Sawyer, E. F., Elizabeth City 
Seism, L. B., Kings Mountain 
Scott, E. W., Canton, R. 1 
Scott, W. H., Selma 
Sears, H. C, Apex, R. 3 
Sears, R. D., Siler City 
Secrest, David., Lenoir, R. 3 
Sentell, J. E., Penrose 
Sexton, C. W., Edison 
Shaver, J. M., Granite Falls 
Shaw, F. W, Worthville 
Shell, P. J., Nebo 
Shook, John, Leicester 
Shores, J. R., Vilas 
Shuford, Aaron, Celo 
Siler, W. T., Warsaw 
Simmons, Clete, Jonesville 
Simmons, F. L., Old Fort 
Simpson, J. S., Monroe, R. 2 
Simpson, L. M., Brevard 
Sitton, F. J., Sylva 
Smart, B. B., Ellenboro 
Smith, C. R., Colfax 
Smith, H. H., Stony Fork 
Smith. J. A., Tellico 
Smith, Lee, Maggie 
Smith, W. E., Rutherfordton 
Sorrells, A. P., Gilkey 
Sorrells, Lester, Franklin 
Sparks, A. F. ; Toecane 
Sparks, J. Y., Toecane 
Spaulding, J. H., Durham, R. 1 
Spire, H. M., West Asheville 
Stanberry, J. H., Asheville 
Stanley, D. M,, Pilot Mountain 
Stanley, Frank, Lansing 
Stanley, J. H., St. Paul's 
Stanley, K. L., Whiteville 
Stephens, A. L., Black Mountain 
Stockton, W. C, Prentiss 
Strickland, W. M., Tabor City 



Annual of Session 1935 



267 



Sturgills, J. R., Sturgills 
Sudderth, L. W., Montezuma 
Sullins, David L., Altapass 
Summey, J. A., Hamlet 
Swain, H. L., Durham 
Tanner, M. T., Rich Square 
Tate, I. C, Rutherfordton, R. 1 
Tatum, J. W., Elizabethtown 
Teague, A. E., Gastonia, R. 2 
Teague, L. W., Barnardsville 
Teeter, E. D., Stanfield 
Temple, D. L., Greensboro, 

Pomona Station 
Templeman, S. H., Winston- 
Salem, 203 Broad St. 
Testerman, Luther, Lansing 
Thomas,. J. Lester, Mount Holly 
Thomasson, J. A., Hamptonville 
Thompson, W. M., Lilesville 
Thorn, J. L., L T nion Mills 
Tipton, S. D., Burnsville 
Tritt, D. B., Burlington 
Trivett, Dewey, Zionville 
Trivett, G. W., Vilas 
Trivett, J. S., Fleetwood 
Tucker, J. M., Cullowhee 
Turner, L. S., Concord 
Turner, Marvin, Shelby 
Tyner, J. T., Boardman 
Utley, C. H., Durham 
Vaughan, A. L., Brevard 
Wacaster, Lee, Cherryville 
Waldrop, J. J., Yale 
Walker, D. N., Old Fort 
Walker, G. G., Rutherfordton 



Walker, J. M., Boiling Springs 
Walker, M., Cycle 
Walton, M. C, Wilmington 
Weaver, G. H., Raeford 
Webb, U. S., East Rockingham 
Wheeler, W. P., Charlotte 
White, J. P., Maggie 
Wilcox, Joseph, West Jefferson 
Williams, G. W., Canton 
Williams, J. D., Rockingham 
Williams, J. G., Jackson Springs 
Williams, W. A., Brevard 
Wilkinson, G. D., Lowell 
Willoughby, R. A., Lumberton, 

R. 3 
Wilson, E. D., Burnsville 
Wilson, L. A., Boone 
Wilson, L. C. Sugar Grove 
Wilson, T. G., Flats 
Wilson, T. O., Swiss 
Wilson, W. M., Chapel Hill 
Witten, J. F., Durham, 501 Oak- 
wood Ave. 
Wood, W. G., Gneiss 
Wood, Harry, Raleigh 
Woodruff, I. C, Hays 
Woody, I. W., Frank 
Woody, Taylor, Luck 
Worley, C. A., Worley 
Wright, N. L., Rutherfordton 
Wyatt, Eldreth, Lansing 
Wyatt, Preston, White Top, Va. 
Yarborough, H. C, Winston- 

Salem 
Young, W. W., Statesville 






NORTH CAROLINA 

BAPTIST 

ANNUAL 



ONE-HUNDRED-SIXTH 
YEAR 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
DURHAM 



1936 



Annual 

of the 

North Carolina 
Baptist State Convention 

One-Hundred-Sixth Annual Session 

First Baptist Church 

Durham 
November 10-12, 1936 



Edited by 

Charles B. Deane 

Recording Secretary 
Rockingham, N. C. 



The Next Session will be held 

November 16-18, 1937 

First Baptist Church, Wilmington 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

SECTION PAGE 

Auditor's Report and Financial Statement 97 

Baptist Book Shop, executives of 1 

Baptist Foundation, directors of 2 

Baptist Hospital, trustees of 

Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina, trustees of 3 

Baptist Training Union, executives of 1 

Baptist World Alliance, executives of 6 

Benevolences, secretary of 1 

Biblical Recorder, directory of 5 

Campbell College, trustees of 3 

Charity and Children, directory of 5 

Chowan College, trustees of 3 

Church Building Aid (113) 60 

Committees 

Baptist Men's Convention (22) 23 

Biblical Recorder, to study (22) 23 

Committee on Committees (8) 20 

Enrollment (5) 19 

General Board, to report on report of (22) 22 

Historical Commission (22 ) 22 

Memorials (1937) (22) 22 

Needv, Aged, and Infirm (22) 23 

Order of Business. (1937) (22) 22 

Place and Preacher (22) 22 

Promotion and Enlistment (22) 23 

Publicity (22) 22 

Resolutions (22) 22 

Social Service and Civic Righteousness (22) 22 

Trustees and Members General Board, to nominate (22) 22 

Constitution 7 

Amendments .' (43) (65) 28, 35 

Convention 

Audit — Income and Disbursements 97-101 

Directory 1 

Associational 176 

Objectives (104) 53 

Historical Table 187 

Institutions 2.4 

Objectives „ (104) 53 

Officers, executives and administrative 1 

Officers, elected 

General Secretary (10) 18 

President (88) 40 

Recording Secretarv (10) 18 

Vice-Presidents (89) 40 

Proceedings of (1) 15 

Sermon— J. Allan Easley (15) 19 

Debt. Status of Convention 82 

Refinancing Convention (6) 93 

General Board 

By Laws 11 

Officers and organizations 2 

Report (103) 52 

Greetings (16) 19 

Huggins. M. A., vote of appreciation to (12) 18 

Indian Work (114) 61 

Kennedy Home, Superintendent of 3 

Mars Hill College, trustees of 4 

Meredith College, trustees of 4 

Messengers 46 

Mills Home, trustees of 3 

Ministers 

New Ministers recognized (7) 15 

Ordained, pastors 191 

Ordained, not pastors 201 

Ministerial Students 180 

Missionaries, North Carolina, on foreign field 183 

Morgan, Perry, to Ridgecrest (85) 40 

Negro Baptist, recognition .' (33) (115) 26,61 

Oteen Mission (116) 62 

"Our Dead" 45 

Pastoral Assistance (112) 59 

Pastors Circulating Library (119) 64 

Pastors' Conference 

Officers 1937 5 

Program 1936 44 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) 

SECTION PAGE 

Pastors' Schools and Conferences (120) 64 

Reports 

Aid and Program Former Prisoners (34) 26 

Baptist Book Shop (137) 90 

Baptist Colleges 

General Statistics 81 

Baptist Foundation (30) (139) 25, 91 

Baptist Hospital (47) (134) 29, 86 

Audit Summary 102 

Baptist Training Union (124) 70 

Biblical Recorder (14) 19 

In Re, Purchase by Convention (44) 28 

Campbell College (67) (131) 35,79 

Chowan College (67) (129) 35, 78 

Committees on Committees (9) 18 

Co-operative Program (92) (135) 42, 87 

Debt Status 82 

Education (66) (67) (121) 35, 64 

Enrollment (5) 15 

General Board 

Committee, to report on report of (80) 38 

Huggins, Maloy A., Report General Secretary 51 

Meetings / (105) 55 

Objectives (104) 53 

Recommendations 93 

Historical Commission (29) (138) 25, 90 

Laymens Convention (126) 76 

Mars Hill College (66) (130) 35,79 

Memorials (98) 59 

Meredith College (66) (128) 35, 77 

Missions, department of 

Foreign (100) (106) 42, 57 

Home (57) (106) 30, 57 

State (33) (107) 26, 57 

North Carolina Baptist Orphanage (45) (133) 29,84 

Audit Summary 102 

Order of Business 1936 (8) 16 

Place and Preacher (50) 29 

Publicity (76) 36 

Resolutions Committee (90) 41 

Relief and Annuity (48) (132) 29, 82 

Seminaries , (66) 35 

Social Service and Civic Righteousness (64) 32 

Student Work (125) 74 

Sunday School (123) 66 

Trustees and Members General Board, to nominate (81) 38- 

Constitutional Amendment regarding election (65) 35 

Trustees of Convention (23) 24 

Wake Forest College (66) (127) 35,77 

Woman's Missionary Union (20) (141) 21, 95 

Resolutions Offered 

. In Re, Announcements Convention floor (86) 40 

In Re, Calvary Baptist Church, Raleigh (49) 29 

In Re, Campbell College (70) 35 

In Re, Constitutional Amendments (43) (65) 28, 35 

In Re, Convention Indebtedness (91) 41 

In Re, Intoxicating Liquors (77) 36 

Ridgecrest, directory of 5 

Southern Baptist Convention, directory of 5, 6 

Statistical Data 

Associational 104 

Recapitulation 175 

General Church Activities 17S 

Statistical Summary 184 

Southern Baptist Convention, 1935-1936 190 

Woman's Missionary Union 186 

Student Secretary 1 

Sunday School, Executives of 1 

Visitors recognized (5) 15 

Names 49 

Wake Forest College, trustees of 4 

Woman's Missionary Union 

Directory .' 186 

Executives 1 

Memorial— Miss Elsie K. Hunter (20) 21 



DIRECTORY OF THE CONVENTION 



I. EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

Wm. Louis Poteat, Wake Forest President 

R. N. Simms, Sr., Raleigh Vice-President 

Hoyt Blackwell, Mars Hill Vice-President 

A. J. Barton, Wilmington Vice-President 

Maloy A. Huggins, Raleigh General Secretary and Treasurer 

Charles B. Deane, Rockingham Recording Secretary 

L. L. Morgan, Raleigh Statistical Secretary 

R. L. McMillan, Raleigh Trustee 

Wm. Louis Poteat, Wake Forest Trustee 

F. H. Brooks, Smithfield Trustee 

II. OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Headquarters: 200-216 Biblical Recorder Building, Raleigh, N. C. 

Maloy A. Huggins. Raleigh General Secretary and Treasurer 

Miss Margie Murchison, Raleigh Office Secretary 

Miss Esther I vey , Raleigh Bookkeeper 

Miss Margie Murchison, Raleigh Bookkeeper Debt Service Fund 

DEPARTMENT OF MISSIONS 

M. O. Alexander, Cary General Missionary 

J. C. Pipes, Asheville General Missionary 

DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

VV. Perry Crouch, Raleigh Secretary 

Miss Yelma Presiar, Raleigh Office Secretary 

DIVISION OF SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

I.. L. Morgan. Raleigh Secretary 

Miss Bessie Morgan, Raleigh Office Secretary 

DIVISION OF BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 

Nathan C. Brooks, Jr., Raleigh Secretary 

Miss Mabel Starnes, Raleigh Associate Secretary 

Miss Mary Lou Wall. Raleigh Office Secretary 

DIVISION OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Miss Cleo Mitchell, Greensboro Student Secretary 

DEPARTMENT OF BENEVOLENCES 

R. T. Vann, Raleigh Secretary 

BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Mrs. Roger P. Marshall. Raleigh Manager 

Miss Margaret Burch. Raleigh Clerk 

Miss Mary Ayscue, Raleigh Clerk 

DEPARTMENT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro President 

Mrs. Edna R. Harris, Raleigh Corresponding Secretary 

Miss Ora Alf ord, Raleigh Treasurer 

Miss Mary Currin, Raleigh Young People's Leader 

Miss Kathleen Holt Davis, Raleigh Office Secretary 



[1 



2 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

III. THE GENERAL BOARD AND ORGANIZATIONS 

B. E. Morris, President Durham 

J, R. Morgan, I'ice-President Waynesville 

C. B. Deane, Secretary Rockingham 

Term Expiring: 1937 — Mrs. J. T. Alderman, Henderson; Clarence A. Smith, High 
Point; J. W. Kincheloe, Rocky Mount; M. L. Barnes, Mount Holly; J. C. Canipe, Boone; 

E. N. Johnson, Mount Olive; R. J. Hall, Bladenboro; D. H. Wilcox, Winston-Salem; 
Sankey L. Blanton, Wilmington; Mrs. R. L. Wilburn, Roxboro; E. H. Potts, Elizabeth 
City; W. O. Rosser, Smithfield; C. G. Powell, Ahoskie; J. A. Block, Caroleen; R. K. 
Redwine, Hickory; E. N. Gardner, Dunn. 

Term Expiring 1938— John W. Suttle, Shelby; Trela D. Collins, Durham; Mrs. C. D. 
Bain, Dunn; Broadus Wall, Hendersonville: J. B. Willis, Hamlet; A. P. Stephens, Mpre- 
head City; J. R. Morgan, Waynesville; J. H. Highsmith, Raleigh; J. E. Kirk, Greensboro; 
W. D. Poe, Oxford; E. Gibson Davis, Asheville; Clifton J. Allen, Statesville; Paul P. 
Davis, Yadkinville; A. H. Casey, North Wilkesboro; Roy D. Campbell, Wing; R. E. Wall, 
Sanford. 

Term Expiring 1939 — Leroy Martin, Raleigh; Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh; Vance Brown- 
ing, Bryson City; Hugh A. Ellis, Wilson; B. E. Morris, Durham; S. F. Hudson, 
Lowell; H. S. Benfield, Lenoir; E. S. Summers, Concord; A. D. Kinnett, Burlington; 
B. A. Bowers, Gastonia; R. A. Kelly, Belmont; T. C. Johnson, Kinston; R. M. Squires, 
Wake Forest; Luther Little. Charlotte; Earl James, Elkin; R. P. Noble, Raleigh; Wm. 
Louis Poteat, ex officio; C. B. Deane, ex officio. 

Executive Committee: J. H. Highsmith, J. E. Kirk, W. D. Poe, E. N. Gardner, Claude 

F. Gaddy, Leroy Martin, B. E. Morris, ex officio. 

1. Committee on Missions : T. E. Kirk. Chairman, T. R. Morgan, Secretary, R. K. 
Redwine, B. E. Morris. Mrs." R. L. Wilburn, A. P. Stephens, S. F. Hudson, Earl C. 
James, R. A. Kelly, R. M. Squires, M. L. Barnes, J. W. Kincheloe. 

2. Committee on Training Activities: W. D. Poe, Chairman, A. D. Kinnett, Secretary, 
Mrs. C. D. Bain, J. C. Canipe. E. N. Johnson, J. A. Brock, E. H. Potts, R. D. Campbeil, 
Vance Browning, Sankey L. Blanton, E. S. Summers, Broadus E. Wall. 

3. Committee on Education: T. H. Highsmith. Chairman, R. E. Wall, Secretary, Trela 
D. Collins, E. Gibson Davis, J. B. Willis, Paul P. Davis, Mrs. J. T. Alderman", A. H. 
Casey, R. P. Noble, B. A. Bowers, T. C. Johnson, Leroy Martin. 

4. Committee on Benevolence: E. N. Gardner, Chairman, C. T. Allen, Secretary, R. J. 
Hall, Clarence A. Smith, J. W. Suttle, W. O. Rosser, Hugh A. Ellis, D. H. Wilcox, 
H. S. Benfield, Claude F. Gaddy, Luther Little, C. G. Pawell. 

IV. THE INSTITUTIONS OF THE CONVENTION 

Note. In collaboration with George W. Paschal, Baptist Historian, and the Institutional 
Heads, the Recording Secretary in 1933 established the Historical Data that appears under 
the names of the Institutions and Colleges that follow. 

BAPTIST FOUNDATION 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention November 12, 1919. 

Organized December 15. 1919. 

First meeting of Directors November 17, 1920. 

Z. M. Caveness, Chairman, Raleigh 

T. S. Johnson, Secretary, Raleigh 

Term Expiring 1937 — J. L. Peacock, Tarboro; Bruce Benton, Rockingham; Oscar Hay 
wood, New Bern. 

Term Expiring 1938— Carl V. Tyner. Leaksville; Guy Carswell, Charlotte; A. J. Smith, 
Goldsboro. 

Term Expiring 1939— J. D. Wilkins, Greensboro; Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh; E. M. 
Johnson, Lumberton. 

Term Expiring 1940 — T. S. Johnson, Raleigh; Mrs. J. B. Spillman, Greenville; Mrs. 
Paul P. Davis, Yadkinville. 

Term Expiring 1941 — J. R. Weatherspoon, Raleigh; Irvin Carlyle, Winston-Salem; 
George Pennell, Asheville. 

BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

Authorized by Baptist Stale Convention November 17, 1920. 

Chartered December 27, 1922. 

Began Operations May 28, 1923. 

Smith Hagaman, Superintendent, Winston-Salem 

Board of Trustees 

E. L. Davis, President, Winston-Salem 

Term Expiring 1937 — Paul Johnson, Winston-Salem; Grover H. Jones, High Point; 
A. Wayland Cooke, Greensboro. 



Annual of Session 1936 3 

Term Expiring: 1938 — A. H. Eller, Winston-Salem; J. Wilbur Crews, Winston-Salem; 
E. L. Davis, Winston-Salem. 

Term Expiring- 1939 — Mrs. Ruth Roddick, Winston-Salem; Mrs. J. F. Lethco, Char- 
lotte; Fielding Combs, Winston-Salem. 

Term Expiring- 1940 — Thurman D. Kitchin, Wake Forest; T. W. Blackwell, Winston- 
Salem ; B. F. Bray, Marion. 

BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

MILLS HOME 

General Managership began January 12, 188S. 

First orphan, Mary Presson, received November 11, 1885. 

I. G. Greer, General Superintendent, Thomasville. 

KENNEDY HOME BRANCH 

Transfer of property April 26, 1912 

First group admitted June 5, 1914. 

J. C. Houc-H, Superintendent, Kinston 

Board of Trustees 

B. W. Spil,man, Chairman, Kinston 

Term Expiring 1937— Charles Shields. Scotland Neck; J. W. Noell, Roxboro; T. H. 
Broyhill, Lenoir; J. B. Stroud, Greensboro; A. E. Tate, High Point. 

Term Expiring- 1938 — F. B. Hamrick, Raleigh; J. H. Canaday, Kinston; John T. 
Coley, Rocky Mount; R. L. Moore, Mars Hill. 

Term Expiring- 1939 — B. W. Spilman, Kinston; C. L. Haywood, Durham; T. P. Pruitt, 
Hickory; Mrs. F. A. Bower, Kannapolis. 

Term Expiring- 1910 — Zeno Wall, Shelby; H. S. Stokes, Winston-Salem; Mrs. Byron 
C. Scott, Charlotte; Robert A. Mclntyre, Lumberton; Glenn Choate, Salisbury. 

V. TRUSTEES OF VARIOUS COLLEGES 

CAMPBELL COLLEGE 

Opened at Buie's Creek Academy January S, 1887 

Became Buie's Creek Junior College August 31, 1926. 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention to become Campbell College 

December 17, 1926. 

New Charter Campbell College Adopted by Trustees April 7, 1927. 

Leslie H. Campbell, President, Buie's Creek 

Board of Trustees 

B. F. McLeod, Chairman, Buie's Creek 

Term Expiring 1937 — S. F. Teague, Goldsboro; G. F. Pope, Dunn; W. M. Morgan, 
Angier; H. M. Holleman, Asheville; H. B. Taylor, Dunn. 

Term Expiring 1938— B. F. McLeod, Buie's Creek; B. Townsend, Rockfish; W. S. 
Strickland, Dunn; B. P. Gentry, Lillington; J. E. Lanier, Wallace. 

Term Expiring 1939 — John W. Holmes, Farmville; Fred N. Day, Winston-Salem; 
R. B. Wilkins, Durham; R. M. Olive, Fayetteville; W. C. Downing, Fayetteville. 

Term Expiring 1940 — Santford Martin, Winston-Salem; D. T. Dickie, Henderson; D. 
H. Senter, Chalybeate Springs; W. H. LTpchurch, Oxford; D. R. Perry, Durham. 

CHOWAN COLLEGE 

Founded and opened for students as Chowan Female Institute 

October 11, 1848. 

First called Chowan Female College Institute in 1851. 

First called Chowan Baptist Female Institute in 1868. 

Became Chowan College May 17, 1910. 

Roy R. McCullock, President, Murfreesboro 

Board of Trustees 

J. H. Matthews, President, Windsor 

Term Expiring 1937— W. J. Rountree, Hobbsville; Mrs. W. M, Hollowell, Hobbsville; 
W. Harry Stephenson, Pendleton; J. H. Stephenson, Pendleton; J. H. Holmes, Farmville. 

Term Expiring 1938 — J. H. Matthews, Windsor; G. W. Paschal, Wake Forest- D P. 
Medlin, South Mills; J. T. Bolton, Rich Square; S. P. Winborne, Como. 

Term Expiring 1939— J. P. Holoman, Weldon; W. L. Curtis, Ahoskie; Wayland 
Mitchell, Lewiston; J. M. Duncan, Murfreesboro; E. L. Wells, Edenton. 

Term Expiring 1940— Mrs. JR. P. Morehead. Weldon; J. L. White, Elizabeth City; 
P. J. Long, Jackson; W. D. Boone, Winton; B. H. Ward, Sunbury. 



4 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

MARS HILL COLLEGE 

First Commencement or Exhibition as French Broad Baptist Institute 

July 4, 1857. 

Chartered Mars Hill College February 16, 1859. 

Opened as Mars Hill Junior College August 14, 1922. 

R. L. Moore, President, Mars Hill. 

Board of Trustees 

J. B. Grice, President, West Asheville. 

Term Expiring 1937— J. Ben Eller. Statesville; D. C. Bryson, Sylva; N. S. Whitaker, 
Mars Hill; C. E. Blackstock, Asheville: W. R. Chambers, Marion; D. C. May, Durham; 
W. T. Myers, Winston-Salem. 

Term Expiring 1938— Julian A. Glazener, Brevard; R. S. Gibbs, Mars Hill; A. W. 
Whitehurst, Marshall; C. M. Palmer, Albemarle; Robert O. Huffman, Morganton; O. D. 
Revell, Asheville. 

Term Expiring 1939 — T. R. Owen, Asheville; Mrs. W. E. Logan, West Asheville; 
J. B. Grice, West Asheville; J. R. Sams, Mars Hill; Thos. L. Johnson, Asheville; W. H. 
Hipps, Asheville; T. L. Cashwell, Gastonia. 

Term Expiring 1940— J. B. Efird, Charlotte; W. L. Griggs, Charlotte; C. M. Wall, 
Lexington; E. F. Watson, Burnsville; W. H. Wray, Gastonia; Mrs. Rush Stroup, Shelby. 

MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Incorporated as Baptist Female University of North Carolina February 27, 1891. 

Opened for Students 'September 27, 1899. 

By Legislative enactment became Baptist University for Women January 20, 1905. 

Became Meredith College by Legislative enactment January 24, 1911. 

Charles E. Brewer, President, Raleigh 

Board of Trustees 

J. R. Hunter, President, Raleigh 

Term Expiring 1937 — L. R. Varser, Lumberton; W. O. Riddick, Azalea; R. H. 
Riggsbee, Durham; R. N. Simms, Raleigh; W. A. Thomas, Statesville; F. A. Bower, 
Kannapolis. 

Term Expiring 1938 — Mrs. Ruby McK. Barrett, Laurinburg; Mrs. Margaret Shields 
Everett, Greenville; E. McK. Goodwin, Morganton; J. R. Hunter, Raleigh; Henry Ed- 
wards, Shelby; J. D. Boushall, Raleigh. 

Term Expiring 1939 — T. A. Avera, Rocky Mount; Oscar Creech. Ahoskie; W. H. 
Weatherspoon, Raleigh; Wm. L. Poteat, Wake Forest; Mrs. Maude Davis Bunn, Raleigh; 
Eph Whisenhunt, Elkin; J. T. J. Battle, Greensboro. 

Term Expiring 1940 — Mrs. Foy Johnson Farmer, Raleigh; Z. M. Caveness, Raleigh; 
C. T. Council, Durham; J. Y. Joyner, LaGrange; D. H. Penton, Wilmington; Mrs. Anna 
Kitchin Josey, Scotland Neck. 

WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Opened as Wake Forest Institute February 3, 1834. 

Chartered as Wake Forest College December 28, 1838. 

Thurman D. Kitchin, President, Wake Forest 

Board of Trustees 

Claude Gore, President, Rockingham. 

Term Expiring 1937 — Charles B. Deane, Rockingham; Eugene I. Olive, North Wilkes- 
boro; W. J. Conrad, Winston-Salem; Claude Gore, Rockingham; E. B. Josey, Wilmington; 
G. E. Lineberry, Raleigh; W. Reid Martin. Raleigh; C. Ray Sharpe, Lexington; C. N. 
Peeler, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1938 — J. E. Allen, Warrtnton; A. Y. Arledge, Henderson ville; J. M. 
Broughton, Raleigh; H. T. Hunter, Cullowhee; W. M. Johnson, Winston-Salem; T. H. 
King, Clinton; Leland Kitchin, Scotland Neck; R. T. Vann, Raleigh; E. Y. Webb, Shelby, 

Term Expiring 1939 — C. O. Bridger, Bladenboro; C. H. Durham, Lumberton, Germain 
Bernard, Durham; F. P. Hobgood, Greensboro; G. A. Norwood, Goldsboro; J. Bivens 
Helms, Morganton; R. E. Royall, Wake Forest; John Arch McMillan, Thomasville; 
Clarence Poe, Raleigh. 

Term Expiring 1940 — Johnson J. Hayes, Greensboro; A. J. Hutchins, Canton; John A. 
Oates, Fayetteville; Herbert Peele, Elizabeth City; J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro; A. D. 
Ward, New Bern; B. M. Watkins, Durham; J. C. Watkins, Winston-Salem; J. B. Willis, 
Hamlet; W. L. Wyatt, Raleigh. 



Annual of Session 1936 5 

VI. OFFICERS BAPTIST PASTORS' CONFERENCE 
Officers for 1937 

Clifton J. Allen, President, Statcsville 

W. L. Griggs, Vice-President, Charlotte 

Waldo D. Early. Secretary, Granite Falls 

VII. STANDING COMMITTEES 

(SEE PAGE 22) 

VIII. NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST PRESS 

1. Biblical Recorder, Raleigh, N. C. 

Published every Wednesday by the Biblical Recorder Publishing Company, N. A. Dunn, 

President Board of Directors. 
Founded 1833 — Incorporated 1901. 

J. S. Farmer, Editor and Business Manager. 
The paper was founded by Thomas Meredith in Edenton in 1833, moved to New Bern 

in 1835, then to Raleigh in 1838. Publication was suspended in 1841, but resumed 

in 1843. Mr. Meredith died in 1851. 
Editors, succeeding Mr. Meredith, have been as follows: T. W. Tobey, 1851-53; J. J. 

James, 1854-61; J. D. Hufham, 1861-67; J. H. Mills, 1867-73; A. F. Redd and 

J. D. Hufham, 1873-74; C. T. Bailey, 1875-95; J. W. Bailey, 1895-1907; C. W. 

Blanchard. 1907; Hight C. Moore, 1907-17; Livingston Johnson, 1917-31; J. S. 

Farmer, 1931- 
Circulation, 10,600. Price $2.00 a year. 
Organ of the Baptist State Convention. 

2. Charity and Children, Thomasville, N. C. 

Published each week by the trustees of the Mills Home. Inc., (formerly Thomasville 
Baptist Orphanage) B. W. Spilman (Kinston, N. C. ) President. 

Established 1887. Circulation 29,671; Price $1.00 a year. 

John Arch McMillan, Editor; I. G. Greer, General Superintendent; R. D. Covington, 
Treasurer. 

Orphanage organ of the Baptists of North Carolina. 

IX. RIDGECREST 

Chartered March 1907. 

Southern Baptist Convention Summer Assembly Grounds, 

Ridgecrest, North Carolina 

GOVERNING BOARD 

Executive Committee Southern Baptist Convention 

Austin Crouch, Executive Secretary, Nashville, Tenn. 

Perry Morgan, Manager, Ridgecrest.* 

T. L. Holcomb, Chairman Program Committee 1937, Nashville, Tenn. 

DIRECTORY OF THE SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 

The Convention was organized May 8, 1845, and held its first meeting in Augusta, Ga. 

The last session was held in St. Louis, Missouri. 

The next session will be held in New Orleans, Louisiana. May 13, 1937. 

Officers of the Convention: 

President: John R. Sampey, Louisville, Kentucky. 

Vice-Presidents: Walter C. Goodson, Macon, Mo.; John L. Whorton, Longview, Texas. 

Secretaries: Hight C. Moore, Nashville, Tenn.; J. Henry Burnett, Macon, Ga. 

Boards of the Convention: 

Foreign Mission Board, Richmond, Va., Charles E. Maddry, Executive Secretary. 

North Carolina member: F. C. Feezor, Raleigh. 
Home Mission Board, Atlanta, Ga.; J. B. Lawrence, Executive Secretary-Treasurer. 

North Carolina member: Ira D. S. ICnight, Durham. 
Sunday School Board, Nashville, Tenn., T. L. Holcomb, Executive Secretary. North 

Carolina member: B. A. Bowers, Gastonia. 
Relief and Annuity Board, Dallas, Texas, T. J. Watts, Executive Secretary. North 

Carolina member: E. Norfleet Gardner, Dunn. 



Succeeded R. F. Staples, February 1st, 1936. 



6 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Institutions of the Convention : 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, John R. Sampey, President, Louisville, Ky. 
North Carolina members of Board of Trustees: J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro; 
Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem; Zeno Wall, Shelby. 

Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, L. R. Scarborough, President, Seminary 
Hill, Texas. North Carolina member of Board of Trustees: A. P. Stephens, 
Morehead City. 

Baptist Bible Institute, W. W. Hamilton, President, New Orleans, La. North Caro- 
lina member of Board of Trustees: Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro. 

American Baptist Theological Seminary: E. P. Aldredge, Acting Executive Secretary, 
Nashville, Tenn. North Carolina member of Board of Directors: A. J. Barton, 
Wilmington. 

Education Commission. North Carolina member: W. R. Cullom, Wake Forest. 

Hospital Commission (New Orleans, La.). North Carolina member: S. H. Temple- 
man, Winston-Salem. 

Social Service Commission, A. J. Barton, Wilmington, N. C. North Carolina member: 
W. L. Poteat, Wake Forest. 

Standing: Committees of the Convention: 

Baptist Brotherhood of the South, J. T. Henderson, General Secretary, Knoxville, Tenn. 

North Carolina member: Johnson J. Hayes, Greensboro. 
Executive Committee, Austin Crouch, Executive Secretary, Nashville, Tenn. North 

Carolina members: J. Powell Tucker, Raleigh; Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte. 

Special Committees of the Convention : 

Advisability of creating an Agency of Social Research: E. McNeill Poteat, Chairman, 

Raleigh; John Arch McMillan, Thomasville. 
Baptist Papers: Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem. 
On Boards: E. Gibson Davis, Asheville. 
Memorial to Luther Rice, Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte. 

Officers of the Woman's Missionary Union: 

Organized May 14, 1888, as auxiliary to the Southern Baptist Convention. Head- 
quarters, Birmingham, Alabama. Miss Kathleen Mallory, Corresponding Secretary. 
North Carolina Vice-President, Mrs. Wesley N. Jones. 

BAPTIST WORLD ALLIANCE 

First Session, London, July 10-17, 1905. 

George W. Truett, President, Dallas, Texas. 

J. H. Ruskbroke, General Secretary, 4 Southampton Row, London, England, 

Next meeting: 1939, Atlanta, Georgia, U. S. A. 



CONSTITUTION 

I. NAME AND OBJECT 

Section I. This body shall be known as the Baptist State Convention of 
North Carolina. 

The object of the Convention shall be to promote Missions, Education, 
Social Service, the distribution and study of the Bible and sound religious 
literature ; and to co-operate with the Southern Baptist Convention in its work. 

II. MEMBERSHIP 

Section 1. The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina shall be com- 
posed of not more than three representatives from each white association in 
the State and not more than one representative from each co-operating 
church for every fifty members or fraction thereof and of the officers and 
members of the General Board of the Convention and of the Life Members so 
declared under the previous Constitution : Provided, that no church have 
more than ten representatives and no one shall be a member of the Convention 
who is not a member in good standing of a Missionary Baptist Church co- 
operating with the Convention. 

III. MEETINGS 

Section 1. The Convention shall meet annually on Tuesday after the third 
Sunday in November.* 

IV. OFFICERS 

Section 1. The officers of the Convention shall be a President, three 
Vice-Presidents, a Recording Secretary, a General Secretary, a Treasurer (the 
General Secretary may be elected as Treasurer at the discretion of the Con- 
vention), three Trustees of the Convention, and five Directors of the North 
Carolina Baptist Foundation. The President. Vice-Presidents, Recording Sec- 
retary, General Secretary, and Treasurer shall be elected as the Convention may 
determine, the Trustees of the Convention and Directors of the Baptist Founda- 
tion, in the manner provided by their respective charters. The terms of office 
of President and Vice-Presidents commence at the conclusion of the session at 
which they are elected and continue until the close of the next Convention. 

Sec. 2. The President shall preside over the deliberations of the Conven- 
tion and discharge such other duties as are imposed upon him by the Con- 
vention or as are incumbent on the presiding officer of a deliberative body. 
Fie shall appoint all Committees unless the Convention shall otherwise direct. 
In case of his absence or incapacity one of the Vice-Presidents shall act in 
his stead. 

Sec 3. The Recording Secretary shall record and preserve the proceedings 
of the Convention and have the same printed and distributed. 

Sec 4. The General Secretary of the Convention shall have administrative 
supervision of the work of Missions, Education, Benevolences, and all other 
general training activities of the Convention. He shall employ a reputable 
auditor or firm of auditors each year to make a complete audit of the books and 
accounts of the treasurer and bookkeeping department and report to the Execu- 
tive Committee of the General Board, which shall receive and pass upon said 



Amendment passed 1936 Convention (See page 28, section 43). 

[7 



8 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

report and have it published in the minutes of the Convention and in the 
Biblical Recorder or the then recognized denominational organ. 

Sec. 5. The Treasurer shall receive all funds sent to him for the objects 
of the Convention, make acknowledgment of the same once a month in the 
Biblical Recorder or the then recognized denominational organ, give a bond 
to the Trustees of the Convention in such amount as they may determine for 
the faithful performance of his duties and prescribe the terms and conditions 
of said bond. He shall also forward at least once a month all contributions to 
their destination; at every meeting of the Convention he shall make a full 
report of his receipts and disbursements, and upon retiring from his office, 
deliver to his successor all moneys, papers, books and other property belonging 
thereto. 

Sec. 6. The Trustees shall take and hold the title to any and all property 
acquired by and belonging to the Convention. They shall require a sufficient 
bond from the Treasurer. In case he shall refuse or neglect to give satisfactory 
bond within thirty days after his election the Trustees shall have power to elect 
a successor. The said Trustees shall elect a chairman and secretary and report 
annually to the Convention the work done by them. They shall receive and 
make such conveyances of the properties of the Convention as directed by the 
Convention. During the interim between sessions of the Convention the said 
Trustees may receive and convey the property of the Convention upon the 
advice and direction of the General Board. 

V. GENERAL BOARD 

Section 1. The General Board of the Convention shall consist of the 
President and Recording Secretary of the Convention, ex officio, and forty- 
eight members from the State at large. The Convention shall elect one-third 
of the members from the State at large to hold office for one year, one-third 
for two years, and one-third for three years, but as the terms expire the suc- 
cessors shall serve for terms of three years. That retiring members of the 
Board be ineligible for re-election until the following meeting of the State 
Convention. No one in the employment for pay of any Institution or Board 
fostered by this Convention shall be eligible to membership on this Board. The 
General Board shall fill all vacancies in its membership between the session of 
the Convention until the session of the next Convention, when the vacancies 
shall be filled by the Convention itself in the manner provided by its laws. 

Sec. 2. The General Board shall have charge and control, except when 
otherwise directed by the Convention, of all work of the Convention, including 
Missions, Education, Benevolences, and all other general activities, in the 
interim between the sessions of the Convention. Any action by the General 
Board during the interim between the sessions of the Convention vitally related 
to the work of the Convention shall be binding upon the Convention : Provided, 
it shall not relate to any matter previously committed to some other agency of 
the Convention with power to act. But any action of the Board during the 
interim shall be reported fully to the Convention at its next session. 

Sec. 3. The General Board shall report to each session of the Convention 
upon the work done in each department, viz. : Missions, Education, Benevolences 
and all other general activities. The Board shall have its report printed and 
ready for .distribution at the first session of the Convention; all reports from 
Educational Institutions, Hospitals, Orphanages, Baptist Foundation, and all 
other institutions or agencies of the Convention shall report to the Convention 
through the General Board. 

Sec. 4. The General Board of the Convention shall meet in regular session 



Annual of Session 1936 9 

in December and June of each year, and in cases of emergency at the call of 
the President and General Secretary of the Board or any five members. 

Sec. 5. At the first December meeting of the General Board the work of 
the Convention shall be divided as follows : Missions, Education, Benevolences 
and Training Activities. The membership of the General Board shall be divided 
into four committees of twelve each and the work as above outlined shall be 
assigned to these committees. Each committee shall organize itself by the 
selection of a chairman and a recording secretary. All appropriations for the 
work of the various departments of the General Board shall be made by the 
General Board; but each committee shall make to the General Board definite 
and specific recommendations as to all appropriations. 

Sec. 6. The General Board shall select an Executive Committee consisting 
of the Chairman of the Committees on Missions, Education, Benevolences and 
Training Activities, the President of the General Board, and two other mem- 
bers of the General Board. The Executive Committee shall meet at the call 
of the General Secretary and shall have general direction and oversight of 
all the work of the General Board in the interim between the sessions of the 
Board and such other matters as shall be assigned to it by the General Board. 

Sec. 7. The General Board shall be successor in law to all legal obligations 
heretofore incurred by the Board of Missions and by the Board of Education. 

Sec. 8. At each December meeting the General Board may select such 
other departmental assistants as may be needed. 

VI. TRUSTEES OF CONVENTION'S INSTITUTION 

Section 1. The charters of all institutions owned and supported by the 
Convention shall contain the following provisions as nearly as may be and 
conformable to the number of trustees to be elected, that is to say : 

a. The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina shall elect the trus- 
tees of said corporation and their regular term of office shall be four years. 
At the first election by the Convention one-fourth of the board of trustees 
shall be elected to serve for one year, one-fourth for two years, one- fourth 
for three years and the remaining one- fourth for four years. At each 
subsequent regular annual session of the Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina one-fourth of the members of the Board of Trustees of said cor- 
poration shall be elected by the Convention to succeed the members of said 
Board retiring. 

b. The members of the Board of Trustees of said corporation shall be 
residents of the State of North Carolina and members in good and regular 
standing of a Missionary Baptist Church co-operating with the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina. 

c. Removal from the State or ceasing for any reason to be a member 
in good and regular standing of a Missionary Baptist Church co-operating 
with the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina shall be equivalent to a 
resignation from said Board of Trustees. Any vacancy on the Board shall 
be filled by the remaining members until the next regular annual session 
of the Convention and the Convention shall at its next regular annual ses- 
sion fill the vacancy for the unexpired term. 

d. The term of office of a trustee who has not resigned, died, become 
disqualified, or been removed shall not expire until his successor shall have 
been duly elected and qualified. 

e. The Board of Trustees of said corporation by the affirmative vote of 
three-fourths of its entire membership, given in regular annual meeting or 
in a special meeting duly called for the purpose, shall have power to remove 



10 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

from office any trustee of such corporation for cause considered sufficient by 
such Board, but only after reasonable notice to such trustee and opportunity 
to him to be heard by the Board. 

f. The Baptist State Convention shall have the right at any time to 
remove from office any trustee for cause considered sufficient by the Con- 
vention, but only after reasonable notice to such trustee and opportunity for 
him to be heard by the Convention. Notice of such contemplated action and 
hearing by the Convention may be given by the Executive Committee of 
the Convention. 

g. That no individual shall serve on any Board, or Institution, ivho is 
at the same time holding membership on any other Board or Institution.* 

Sec. 2. The Trustees of all institutions, benevolent, educational or other- 
wise under the control of the Convention shall be elected by the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina and shall hold office for the term to which 
elected, unless sooner terminated. When any vacancy shall occur in any Board 
of any such institution a nominating committee elected by the Convention shall 
nominate to the Convention Baptists to fill such vacancy. The Trustees of all 
institutions owned and suported by the Convention shall make annual report 
to the nominating committee of any vacancies. Each Board shall have the 
right to make any suggestion to the nominating committee it may see fit 
regarding such nominations, and all nominations made by the committee shall 
be passed upon by the Convention. The Convention shall have the right to 
adopt the report of the nominating committee and elect the trustees thus nomi- 
nated, or to substitute the name of other trustee or trustees in lieu thereof, 
or recommit said report for further consideration as the case may be. 

VII. GENERAL ITEMS 

Section 1. Individuals, churches, and associations, or others desiring the 
assistance and co-operation of the Baptists of the State in any work not already 
fostered by the Convention should present the question to the agency under 
which it should be properly placed. If the agency should refuse to take it up, 
it may be presented to the Convention under miscellaneous business or a special 
order. 

Sec. 2. The members of the Boards of the Convention and Institutions 
affiliated with the Convention shall be distributed as widely as practicable, both 
as to territory and individuals. 

Sec. 3. The Convention year shall close December 31 of each year. 

Sec. 4. The. compensation of all paid officers and employees of the Con- 
vention, the General Board, and its committees shall be fixed by the Executive 
Committee subject to review by the General Board at its next meeting. 

Sec. 5. No institution or agency affiliating with the Convention shall en- 
cumber its property or change its status with respect to the Convention with- 
out authority of the Convention or its General Board. 

That except as may be necessary in the reasonable anticipation of current 
revenues and payable out of the same, or for the purpose of funding or refinanc- 
ing any indebtedness of the Convention now outstanding, neither the Conven- 
tion, nor its General Board shall have the power to create any debt or obliga- 
tion binding on the Convention ; and no other board, agency or institution of, 
or affiliated with the Convention, shall have the power at any time to create 
any debt or obligation binding on the Convention. 

Sec. 6. If for any reason, it shall be necessary to select a place or to 
change the time or place of the meeting of the Convention after the Convention 



Amendment passed 1936 Convention (See page 35, section 65). 



Annual of Session 1936 11 

adjourns, the President, Recording Secretary and the General Secretary of the 
Convention shall be a committee with power to make necessary change or 
changes.* 

Sec. 7. This constitution may be changed or amended on any day of any 
annual session of the Convention by two-thirds vote of the members present 
when the vote is taken, provided notice of the contemplated amendment or 
change shall have been announced on a previous day of the Convention. 



BY-LAWS OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

I. THE PRESIDENT AND RECORDING SECRETARY 

The President of the General Board, in addition to the regular duties 
incumbent upon such officers, shall appoint special committees to investigate 
and report upon any matters which concern equally all departments of the 
work of the Convention. The Secretary shall record all proceedings in correct 
form and preserve the same. 

II. OFFICERS, SECRETARIES AND DEPARTMENTAL 
ASSISTANTS 

At the annual December meeting of the General Board, there shall be elected 
the following officers, who shall serve for one year, and until their successors 
are elected and qualified : President, Vice-President and Recording Secretary. 

At the same time the Board shall elect all Departmental Heads and such 
other assistants as may from time to time be deemed necessary, and shall fix 
compensation of its Secretaries and other employees. 

III. QUORUM 

Seventeen members shall be required to constitute a quorum of the Board. 
Five shall be required to constitute a quorum of any Department. Four shall 
constitute a quorum of the Executive Committee of the General Board. 

IV. THE WORK OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

The work of the General Board shall be apportioned among its four divi- 
sions, in so far as may be practicable, as indicated below. The General Board, 
the Executive Committee of the General Board and the General Secretary (48 
members exclusive of the President and Secretary of the Convention, who are 
ex officio members) : 

1. Department of Missions — (12) — Secretary of Missions — Division of 
(1) Field Work; (2) Evangelism; (3) Negro Work. 

2. Department of Training — (12) — Secretary of Training — Division of 
(1) Sunday Schools— Secretary ; (2) B. Y. P. U.— Secretary ; (3) Student 
Activities. 

3. Department of Benevolences — (12) — Secretary of Benevolences — Divi- 
sion of (1) Orphanage; (2) Hospital; (3) Ministers' Relief. 

4. Department of Education— (12) — Secretary of Education — Division of 
(1) Educational Institution; (2) Ministerial Education. 

5. Department of Woman's Missionary Union. 

The Executive Committee shall have power in its discretion, to modify, en- 
large, diminish, or otherwise alter the divisions of the work of the Board 



* Due to Thanksgiving Day conflict, the officers herein have decreed that the 1937 
Convention meet on Tuesday after the second Sunday in November rather than as the 
Constitution stands amended. 



12 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

as it may from time to time deem advisable or necessary, the changes so made 
to be reported to the next regular meeting of the General Board for its 
consideration. 

V. UNDESIGNATED GIFTS 

The General Board at its annual meeting shall determine the percentage of 
undesignated gifts that each object of the Convention shall receive, including 
State and South-wide, provided always that any allocation of such funds shall 
not violate any order with respect to the same previously made by the Baptist 
State Convention. 

VI. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The Executive Committee shall have power to borrow money and execute 
notes on behalf of the General Board for the purpose of meeting the obligations 
of said Board, and to do and perform any act incidental to or necessary in the 
execution and discharge of the work of the General Board : Provided, the 
Executive Committee shall not incur obligations for any object in excess of 
the budget fixed by the General Board. Notes may be executed in the name 
of the General Board and on its behalf by the Chairman of the Executive Com- 
mittee attested by the General Secretary, and when so executed by authority of 
the Executive Committee duly give, shall be the binding obligation of the 
General Board. 

The Executive Committee of the General Board shall meet in regular session 
at ten a.m., on Tuesday following the first Sunday in each month, but it may 
meet in called session at any other time upon call of the General Secretary. 

VII. SECRETARY OF EDUCATION 

His duties, together with all other Departmental Heads, or Assistants, shall 
be determined from time to time by the General Board. 

VIII. EXECUTIVE SESSION 

The General Board may by a majority vote of the number present, go 
into executive session at any time for the purpose of considering such matters 
as may claim the consideration of said Board. 

IX. AMENDMENTS 

These by-laws may be amended at any regular meeting by a majority 
vote of the members attending said meeting. 

X. PUBLICATION 

These by-laws, together with any amendments that may be made thereon, 
from time to time, shall be printed in the Minutes of the Baptist State Con- 
vention. 



PROCEEDINGS 



[ 13 



J PROCEEDINGS I 

Durham, North Carolina 

Tuesday Afternoon, November 10, 1936 

The Church In Its Service of Worship 

1. North Carolina Missionary Baptists gathered in the main auditorium of 
the First Baptist Church, Durham, on Tuesday, November 10, 1936 and 
promptly at 2 p.m., President Zeno Wall called this the one hundred sixth 
annual session to the transaction of business. 

2. Led by Horace Eason, Shelby. Director of Music during this session, 
the Convention joined in singing "Faith of Our Fathers", with Mrs. W. T. 
Carpenter, organist of the host church, and Convention pianist, assisting. 

3. The scripture reading and prayer of this opening period was led by 
C. R. Hinton, Tabor City. 

4. President Wall and the Convention appreciatively recognized the host 
pastor and Chairman of the Convention Committee of the Durham Baptist 
Churches, Ira D. S. Knight, who in turn called forward and presented the 
pastors of the city who planned so well for the Convention. 

Durham Baptist Ministers: H. B. Anderson, Grace; C. E. Byrd, 
Yates; W. G. Hall, Angler Avenue; P. P. Hartsell, Lakewood; B. E. 
Morris, West Durham; C. S. Norville, Edgemont ; J. T. Riddick, 
Watts Street. 

5. Visitors in attendance were here, and at other times during the sessions, 
welcomed by the presiding officers. (See page 49). 

(i. Enrollment: The Committee on Enrollment as named by the Presi- 
dent composed of W. G. Hall, Chairman, C. A. Rhyne, Zon Roberson, 
Y. C. Elliott, O. T. Binkley, J. A. Hunnicutt and J. A. Snow received 
and reported a registration totaling 426. A motion by W. G. Hall, 
passed wherein the present registration and those who register will 
constitute the Convention from day to day. 

7. A roster of New Pastors were read by General Secretary Huggins and 
after their presentation the Convention's President spoke words of greeting. 

Thomas E. Baber, Greensboro; M. L. Bannister, Oxford; Sankey 
L. Blanton, Wilmington; S. K. Brazil, Charlotte; Carl E. Gaddy, 
Columbia ; George N. Harward, Chapel Hill ; C. P. Harring, Fairmont ; 
Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem; H. M. Hocutt, Sylva; Lewis E. 
Ludlum, Asheville ; W. L. Lynch, Mars Hill ; R. A. Thompson, New 
Bern ; Broadus E. Wall, Hendersonville ; O. K. Webb, Morganton ; 
John L. White, Jr., Elizabeth City ; J. L. Willis, Roanoke Rapids. 

8. The order of business now being followed was presented by Chairman 
J. A. Easley, Wake Forest and upon his motion adopted. 



[15 



16 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

ORDER OF BUSINESS 

Zexo Wall, President, Presiding 

Convention Theme: 
The Local Church in Our World Today 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON, NOVEMBER 10 

The Church In Its Service of Worship 

2 :00 — Praise and Prayer C. R. Hinton, Tabor City 

2:15 — Enrollment and Organization 
2:30 — Appointment of Committees 
2 :35 — Presentation of New Pastors 

2 :45 — Presentation of Reports 

3 :30 — Biblical Recorder 

4:00 — Worship and Convention Sermon Chas. H. Durham, Lumberton 

Alternate, J. A. Easley, Wake Forest 

TUESDAY EVENING 

The Church In Service to Its Membership and Community 

7 :30 — Praise and Prayer John R. Link, Windsor 

7 :45 — Christian Education and Training 

(1 (Sunday Schools. (2) Baptist Training Union. (3) Baptist Student 
Union. (4) Baptist Men, Report of Special Committee. 

8 :30 — Woman's Missionary Union 
9:00 — Business 

(1) Announcement of Committees. (2) Report of Trustees of Conven- 
tion. 
9:10 — Address: The Church In Service to the 

Community Arch C. Cree, Salisbury 

9 :45 — Adjournment 

WEDNESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 11 

The Church In Service to the People of the State 

9 :00 — Praise and Prayer Nane Starnes, Asheville 

9 :15 — Business 

(1) Report of Historical Commission. (2) Miscellaneous. 
9 :30 — The Baptist Foundation 

10:00— State Missions 

(1) Missionary Pastoral Assistance. (2) Church Building. (3) For 
the Negroes. (4) For the Indians. (5) For the Prison Population, 
Report of Special Committee. 

10:40 — Music and Miscellaneous 

10:50 — State Mission Opportunities 

(1) In Eastern North Carolina — B. W. Spilman, Kinston. (2) In Pied- 
mont North Carolina — B. E. Morris, Durham. (3) In Western 
North Carolina — Wayne Williams, Oteen. 

11 :00 — Armistice Day Memoirs and Prayer. 

11 :40 — Music and Miscellaneous 

11:55 — Worship and Sermon: The Church at 

Worship O. T. Binkley, Chapel Hill 



Annual of Session 1936 17 

wednesday afternoon 

The Church In Service to Those In Need 
2 :30— Praise and Prayer E. H. Potts, Elizabeth City 

2 :45 — Business 

(1) Report of Committee on Biblical Recorder. (2) Report of Com- 
mittee on Time of Annual Meeting. 

3 :00— The Orphan Child 
3 :40— The Sick 
4:10— Music 

4:15— The Aged Minister 

4:45 — Miscellaneous and Adjournment 

WEDNESDAY EVENING 

The Church In Service to the People of America 
7 :30 — Praise and Prayer C. E. Baucom, Concord 

7 :45 — Social Service and Civic Righteousness 
8:10— Music 

8 :20 — Home Missions 

9 :30 — Adjournment 

THURSDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 12 

The Church Training Christian Leaders 

9 :00— Praise and Prayer C. E. Ruffin, Ellerbe 

9 :15 — Business 

(1) Report of Committee on Publicity. (2) Report of Committee on 
Aged and Infirm 
9 :30 — Sunday School Board 
10 :00 — Seminaries 

(1) Baptist Bible Institute. (2) Southwestern Theological Seminary. 
(3) Southern Baptist .Theological Seminary. 

10 :45 — Music and Miscellaneous 
10:50 — Reports of the Colleges 

11 :20 — Address — Christian Education and the World 

Situation Sankey L. Blanton, Wilmington 

11:55 — Worship and Sermon — The Home, the Source of 

Christian Leaders Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem 

THURSDAY AFTERNOON 

The Church Enlisted In Ji'orld Wide Service 

2 :15 — Praise and Prayer A. Lincoln Fulk, High Point 

2:30 — Business 

(1) Report of Committee to Nominate Trustees, etc. (2) Election of 
Officers. 

3 :00 — A Worthy Financial Program for the 

Local Church C.J. Allen, Statesville 

3 :30 — The Co-operative Program cf Southern Baptists 

(1) Report of Promotion and Enlistment Committee. (2) Reports from 
the Field. (3) Address: Why I Believe In the Co-operative 

Program J. E. Dillard, Nashville, Tenn. 

4:45 — Miscellaneous and Adjournment 



18 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

THURSDAY EVENING 

The Church In Service Beyond the Seas 

7 :30— Praise and Prayer G. T. Mills, Apex 

7:45 — Report of Committee on Memorials 

7 :50— Address : Luther Rice W. H. Williams, Charlotte 

8 :20 — Foreign Missions 
9:30 — Final Adjournment 

John Allan Easley, Chairman, 

G. N. Cowan, 

T. L. Sasser, 

B. W. Spilman, 

Mrs. J. S. Farmer, 

Charles H. Stevens, 

Committee. 

9. President Wall announced this Committee : 

Committee on Committees: A. D. Kennett, Chairman, A. J. Barton, 
F. C. Feezor, C. V. Hudson, A. V. Joyner, Luther Little, W. A. Elam, 
J. T. Riddick, A. Wayland Cooke, Wade D. Bostick, John R. Crawford. 

10. To Act as its officers for the ensuing year the Convention named these 
men : 

General Secretary: Maloy A. Huggins was re-elected by the rising 
and unanimous vote of the Convention when nominated by James B. 
Willis, Hamlet. 

Recording Secretary: The Convention again arose and by unanimous 
vote re-named Charles B. Deane, Rockingham upon Charles H. Dickey's 
motion. 

Statistical Secretary: And again the Convention stood, naming 
Perry Morgan, Ridgecrest to succeed himself upon motion by J. A. 
McKaughan, Winston-Salem.* 

Song : "When I Survey the Wondrous Cross". 

11. To be received as general information the advance report of the General 
Board, the fifth prepared under the direction of General Secretary Huggins, was 
distributed in printed form. (See page 52, section 103.) The Secretary 
called special attention to salient features revealing marked achievements over 
any recent year. 

12. In keeping with this progressive report J. S. Farmer, Raleigh, moved 
and the Convention voted appreciation and offered a silent prayer of thankful- 
ness for the splendid efforts of the General Secretary and the co-operation of 
North Carolina Baptist, thus enabling the Convention to reach this good state 
both spiritually and in securing such favorable financial credit. 

13. Secretary Deane read this telegram from President C. Sylvester Green, 
Coker College, Hartsville, S. C. 

Charles B. Deane, Secretary, 
Baptist State Convention, 
Durham, N. C. 

Please convey my sincerest greetings for greatest session and regret 
that I cannot be present. I shall ever be grateful for the fine friend- 
ships and courtesies of other years and cherish the hope of many equally 
fine privileges of friendship throughout the years. I pray God's guid- 
ance upon you in your considerations. 

Sylvester Green, President, 
Coker College. 

* See page 40, section 85 for resignation and election of successor. 



Annual of Session 1936 19 

14. In the regular order J. S. Farmer, Editor, read the report signed by 
the Biblical Recorder Publishing Company on the Recorder and recorded as a 
matter of information. 

REPORT ON BIBLICAL RECORDER 

We report a good year in which we have made a net gain of 3,000 sub- 
scriptions. We have budgets in fifty-one of the seventy associations. The 
number of budgets is 249, and 130 of them are paid in full for the year. 

The triangular effort by this Convention, our local churches, and the 
Biblical Recorder Publishing Company appealed to our pastors and churches. 
Our thanks are due and are here tendered to Secretary M. A. Huggins for 
aiding in our special effort to increase the circulation of the Recorder. He 
loaned us Rev. Chas. H. Dickey for the first six months of this year. Mr. 
Dickey aided our new circulation manager, Rev. R. F. Terrell, in getting ac- 
quainted in eastern North Carolina. 

Our Baptist pastors have rendered distinct service in putting the Recorder 
in the budgets and thus reducing the price of the paper to their members 
from $2.00 to $1.50 per year. Their efforts are crowned with the results 
mentioned above. We take this occasion to thank each pastor and the repre- 
sentatives in the various churches for the fine service rendered during this 
year. 

Mr. Terrell, a native of Virginia and on the staff of the Baptist Courier, 
of South Carolina, for ten years, came with us the first of the year and imme- 
diately set about the task of changing our individual subscription plan to that 
of budgets in the churches. We consider the results reported above as a 
splendid beginning. We anticipate a larger increase during the coming year. 

Biblical Recorder Publishing Company, 

N. A. Dunn, Chairman, 
Board of Directors, 
J. S. Farmer, Editor. 

Song: "O Jesus Thou Art Standing". 

15. President Wall announced that Charles H. Durham, Lumberton, the 
appointee to preach the Convention Sermon was physically unable to attend 
the Convention and requested W. R. Cullom, Wake Forest, to pray for 
Brother Durham's early return to strong health. Thereafter J. Allan Easley, 
Wake Forest, the appointed Alternate preached the Convention sermon using 
as his theme "Jesus in the Midst of the Church", from the scripture Tohn 
20:19-22. 

16. Greetings : 

Secretary Deane was asked by the Convention and the message that follows 
was despatched to both C. H. Durham and R. T. Vann, and messages were 
also forwarded under the same order to other Baptist State Conventions now 
convened. 

Durham, N. C, 
November 10, 1936. 
Dr. R. T. Vann, 
Baptist Hospital, 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

& 
Dr. C. H. Durham, 
Lumberton, N. C. 

North Carolina Baptists in one hundred and sixth annual session 
note your absence, and through praver hope for your early return to 
health. 

C. B. Deane, 
Recording Secretary. 



20 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Responding Messages 

Lumberton, N. C, 
November 11, 1936. 

Baptist State Convention, 

Care of C. B. Deane, 

Durham, N. C. 

Your gracious message received and greatly appreciated. May the 
Convention be divinely guided and abundantly blessed in all its delibera- 
tions and plans for the future. Love and best wishes to all the brethren. 

Chas. H. Durham. 

Winston-Salem, N. C, 
November 11, 1936. 
Charles B. Deane, 
Durham, N. C. 

My grateful appreciation and warm affection to the convention. 

R. T. Vann. 

Durham, N. C, 
Nov. 10, 1936. 

The General Association of Baptists in Kentucky. 

Paducah, Ky. 

The Tennessee Baptist Convention, 

Clarksville, Tenn. 

Baptist General Convention of Texas, 

Mineral Wells, Tex. 

Baptist General Association of Virginia, 

Richmond, Va. 

The North Carolina Baptist Convention in its one hundredth and 
sixth session conveys in this message a genuine appreciation of Southern 
Baptists and your Convention. We join you in a definite program for 
Christ and His mission. 

Charles B. Deane, 
Recording Secretary. 

Richmond, Va., 
November 11, 1936. 
North Carolina Baptist Convention, 
Durham, N. C. 

Virginia Baptists in annual session send greetings to their fellow 
Baptists in North Carolina. 

Baptist General Association of Virginia. 

Clarksville, Tenn., 
November 11, 1936. 
North Carolina Baptist Convention, 
Durham, N. C. 

Greatly appreciate the kind greetings and may the Lord continue 
to bless the cherished fellow Baptists of North Carolina. First Co- 
rinthians three, nine. 

The Tennessee Baptist Convention. 

Paducah, Ky., 
November 11, 1936. 
North Carolina Baptist Convention, 
Durham, N. C. 

Kentucky Baptists greet you. We go forward together, Jesus leads. 

H. S. Summers, Secretary. 



Annual of Session 1936 21 

The Secretary read this telegram : 

Raleigh, N. C, 
November 11, 1936. 

M. A. Huggins, 

General Secretary, 

Durham, N. C. 

Shaw University extends greetings to Convention and wishes to 

express appreciation for co-operation extended in services of Reverend 

Somerville and other assistants in adjusting Baptist problems among 

negroes in North Carolina. 

Robert P. Daniels. 

17. Pastor Luther Grice, Deland, Florida, prayed and the session closed. 

TUESDAY— Evening Session 

The Church In- Service to Its Membership and Community 

18. After singing "There is a Name I Love to Hear", John R. Link, 
Windsor, led the devotional service, worshipfully assisted with the playing 
of Mrs. Carpenter at the organ. This worship period closed with the singing 
of "O Master Let Me Walk With Thee". 

19. Secretary Huggins led off in presenting the next order, Christian Edu- 
cation and Training. W. Perry Crouch, Raleigh, newly named Secretary of 
the Department of Christian Education, continued the theme to be followed 
by these divisional heads. 

(a) Sunday Schools was the topic discussed by the Secretary, L. L. 
Morgan. (See page 66, section 123). 

(b) Miss Mabel Starnes, Associate Secretary brought the discussion on 
the Baptist Training Union. (See page 70, section 124). 

(c) B. S. U. work was next and prior to the discussion by Miss Cleo 
Mitchell, Secretary, she introduced Zon Robinson, Student Secretary at Wake 
Forest College. (See page 74, section 125). 

(d) This order ended with the adoption of the Department of Christian 
Education Report (See page 64, section 121), following an address on the 
same general theme by Southwide Laymen Secretary, John T. Henderson, 
Knoxville, Tennessee. 

Song : "Trust and Obey". 

20. Making her first appearance before the Convention as the President 
of the State Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro, 
first recognized Mrs. Edna R. Harris, Corresponding Secretary and Miss 
Mary Currin, Young People's Leader and then read the Union's report to be 
adopted as it appears on page 95, upon motion by Mrs. Turner together with 
the following supplementary report, after the address by Ira D. S. Knight, 
Durham, on the Womans' Work. 

"Since the preparation of this report we have been greatly bereaved 
in the death of Miss Elsie K. Hunter, Treasurer of the Women's 
Missionary Union since 1921. Miss Hunter was a woman of splen- 
did business ability and rare consecration and had labored untiringly 
in the interest of the Women's Missionary Union. She will be greatly 
missed and sincerely mourned by a host of friends throughout the state. 
As an organization we express sincere appreciation for her faithful 
services and deep sorrow in the loss we have sustained in her going." 

21. J. Henry Highsmith, Raleigh, gave notice that on tomorrow he would 
introduce a resolution to amend the Constitution as amended at the 1935 
Convention (page 52, section 74), to enable retiring members of the General 
Board to be eligible for re-election.* 



The proposed resolution to amend Constitution was not introduced. 



22 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

22. On behalf of the Committee on Committees, A. D. Kinnett, Chairman 
or R. E. Wall, Secretary read and the Convention named these Committees 
from time to time during the sessions. 

COMMITTEES OF THE PRESENT SESSIONS 
Committee to Report on General Board's Report: 

B. A. Bowers, Chairman, Gastonia ; W. F. West, Roxboro ; T. H. 
King, Clinton ; H. W. Baucom, Waynesville ; John T. Coley, Rocky 
Mount. 

Committee on Place and Preacher: 

J. F. Carter, Chairman, Winston-Salem ; J. L. Jenkins, Boiling 
Springs ; L. Y. Coggins, Semora ; J. L. Jones, Wilmington ; J. C. 
Canipe, Boone; V. M. Dorsett, Siler City; Miss Wynona Chaney, 
Durham. 

Committee on Resolutions: 

T. Clvde Turner, Chairman; Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem; 
S. N. Lamb, Whiteville. 

STANDING COMMITTEES 
To Report in 1937 
Historical Commission: 

G. W. Paschal, Chairman, Wake Forest ; L. E. M. Freeman, Raleigh ; 
W. R. Cullom, Wake Forest ; J. W. Lynch, Wake Forest ; Mrs. Ethel 
T. Crittenden, Wake Forest ; R. L. Moore, Mars Hill ; A. I. Justice, 
Hendersonville ; B. W. Spilman, Kinston; M. Leslie Davis, Beaufort; 
Mrs. T. N. Pitman, Raleigh; Mrs. E. F. Aydlett, Elizabeth City. 

Committee on Memorials: 

J. B. Willis, Chairman, Hamlet ; R. A. Kelly. Belmont, J. Ben Eller, 
Greensboro; C. L Allen, Stitesville; J. W. Kincheloe, Rockv Mount; 
Hoyt Blackwell, Mars Hill; J. E. Lanier, Wallace. 

Order of Business 1937: 

E. Norfleet Gardner, Chairman, Dunn; Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, Greens- 
boro ; Roy McCullock, Murfreesboro ; Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh ; 
Louis S. Gaines, Lexington ; Sankey L. Blanton, Wilmington ; Mrs. 
R. M. Squires, Wake Forest. 

Committee to Nominate Trustees of the Convention, Its 
Institutions, and Members of the General Board for 1937: 

Zeno Wall, Chairman, Shelby; John T. Wayland, Durham; W. K. 
McGee, Thomasville ; W. A. Ayers, Forest City ; Luther Little, Char- 
lotte ; Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro ; A. P. Stephens, Morehead 
City; A. B. Conrad, High Point; Thomas L. Johnson, Asheville ; 
Mrs. Wade Bostick, Shelby. 

Publicity Committee: 

Charles H. Dickey, Chairman, Raleigh ; Charles B. Deane, Rocking- 
ham ; Jasper L. Memory, Wake Forest ; Santford Martin, Winston- 
Salem ; J. S. Farmer, Raleigh ; John Arch McMillan, Thomasville. 

^Social Service and Civic Righteousness: 

A. T. Barton, Chairman, Wilmington; Arch C. Cree,- Salisbury; O. 
T. Binkley, Chapel Hill; John A. Oates, Fayetteville ; J. Powell 
Tucker, Raleigh ; George J. Burnett, Shelby ; M. L. Skaggs. Buie's 
Creek. 



Named by A. J. Barton by order Committee on Committees. 



Annual of Session 1936 



:: Committee to Consider Usefulness or Wisdom 
of Purchasing Biblical Recorder: 

J. L. Peacock, Chairman, Tarboro ; L. L. Hatfield, Hickory; Johnson 
J_. Hayes, Greensboro; F. C. Feezor, Raleigh; A. J. Smith, Greens- 
boro ; A. J. Barton, Wilmington. 

Baptist's Men's Convention Committee: 

R. N. Simms, Chairman, Raleigh; John T. Coley, Rocky Mount; 
T. A. Avera, Rocky Mount; G. H. Jones, High Point; M. Leslie 
Davis, Beaufort; K. R. Curtis, Wilson; Ira D. S. Knight, Durham; 
Wm. Harrison Williams, Charlotte; Johnson J. Hayes, Greensboro; 
Carey P. Herring, Fairmont. 

Needy, Aged, and Infirm: 

fW. D. Poe, Chairman, Oxford; C. V. Brooks. Rowland; C. S. 

Norville, Durham. 

%B. W. Spilman, Kinston ; Thos. P. Pruitt, Hickory; J. W. Noell, 

Roxboro. 

J+Grover H. Jones, High Point ; T. H. Blackwell. Winston-Salem ; 

Smith Hagaman, Winston-Salem. 

Promotion and Enlistment: 



Association 


Name 


Address 


Brushy Mountain 


Eugene Olive, Chairman 


N. Wilkesboro 


Alexander 


Giarles E. Echerd 


Taylorsville 


Alleghany 


W. F. Doughton 


Laurel Springs 


Anson 


E. M. Brooks 


Peachland 


Ashe 


Ira T. Johnson 


Jefferson 


Atlantic 


J. P. Harris 


Maysville 


Avery 


G. D. Danner 


Crossnore 


Beulah 


L. V. Cog-gins 


Semora 


Bladen 


R. J. Hall 


Bladenboro 


Blue Ridge 


W. R. Grigg 


Marion 


Briar Creek 


N. T. Jarvis 


Roaring River 


Brunswick 


B. R. Page 


Bolivia 


Buncombe 


G. C. Cox 


Asheville 


Cabarrus 


E. S. Summers 


Concord 


Caldwell 


Waldo D. Earlv 


Granite Falls 


Catawba River 


0. K. Webb 


Morganton 


Carolina 


Broadus E. Wall 


Hendersonville 


Central 


Carl M. Townsend 


Raleigh 


Chowan 


E. H. Potts 


Elizabeth City 


Columbus 


S. N. Lamb 


Whiteville 


Dock- 


W. Y. Simmons 


Ash 


Eastern 


R. C. Foster 


Warsaw 


Elkin 


David Day 


Elkin 


Flat River 


M. L. Bannister 


Oxford 


French Broad 


Fred Jervis 


Mars Hill 


Gaston 


E. V. Hudson 


Cramerton 


Green River 


R. E. Price 


Rutherfordton 


Haywood 


R. P. McCracken 


Clyde 


Johnston 


A. J. Whitley 


Smithfield 


Kings Mountain 


W. A. Elam 


Shelby 


Liberty 


W. K. McGee 


Thomasville 


Little River 


E. N. Gardner 


Dunn 


Macon 


R. F. Mayberry 


Sylva 


Mecklenburg 


Ben Favell 


Charlotte 


Mitchell 


Rov D. Campbell 


■Wing 


Montgomery 


D. "C. McLeod 


Biscoe 



* This Committee continued in office to report again in 1937. 
t These persons elected by Convention. 

t These persons named by Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina. 
tt These persons named by North Carolina Baptist Hospital. 



24 



N. C. Baptist State Convention 



Association 
Mt. Zion 
Neuse 
New Found 
New South River 
Pamlico 
Pee Dee 
Piedmont 
Pilot Mountain 
Raleigh 
Randolph 
Roanoke 
Robeson 
Rowan 
Sandy Creek 
Sandy Run 
South Fork 
South Mountain 
South Yadkin 
Stanly 

Stone Mountain 
Stony Fork 
Surry 
Tar River 
Tennessee River 
Three Forks 
Transylvania 
Tuckaseigee 
Union 

West Chowan 
West Liberty 
Western North Carolina 
Wilmington 
Yadkin 
Yancey 



Name 

B. E. Morris 
Joe C. Hough 
J. H. Roberts 
G. N. Ashley 
E. R. Stewart 
A. S. Tomlinson 
Grover H. Jones 

D. H. Wilcox 
L. R. Evans 
H. M. Stroup 
John T. Coley 

C. P. Herring 
Earl Bradley 
V. M. Dorsett 
C. C. Crow 

E. F. Sullivan 
J. R. Hufman 
C. A. Millsaps 
L. D. Munn 

C. C. Gambill 
Carl Triplett 
A. V. West 
J. E. Allen 
John H. Harwood 
J. C. Canipe 
M. L. Lewis 
W. N. Cook 
1. T. Wayland 
j. O. Walton 
Fred Stiles 
J. L. Underwood 
A. J. Barton 
T. P. Davis 
R. E. Powell 



Address 
Durham 
Kinston 
Marshall 
Salemburg 
Fairfield 
Laurinburg 
High Point 
Winston-Salem 
Knightdale 
Ramseur 
Rocky Mount 
Fairmont 
Spencer 
Siler City 
Forest City 
Hickory 

Connelly Springs 
Statesville 
Badin 

North Wilkesboro 
Blowing Rock 
Mount Airy 
Warrenton 
Bryson City 
Boone 
Brevard 
Webster 
Monroe 
Windsor 
Murphy 
Hayesville 
Wilmington 
Boonville 
Burnsville 



23. Trustee Wm. Louis Poteat read and thereafter moved the adoption of 
the report from the Convention trustees and accepted as follows : 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE BAPTIST STATE 
CONVENTION OF NORTH CAROLINA 

The Board, composed of W. L. Poteat, Wake Forest ; R. L. Mc- 
Millan, Raleigh ; and F. H. Brooks, Smithfield ; was organized with 
W. L. Poteat, Chairman and R. L. McMillan, Secretary. 

In our report last year we called attention to the time and effort 
that had been given in connection with the will of O. L. Pittman, of 
Edgecombe County. We pointed out that the matter was in litigation 
and that the superior court had rendered a decision in favor of the 
Trustees of the Baptist State Convention. The matter was carried to 
the supreme court and there the higher court ruled in favor of the 
Trustees. The net amount of the estate which came into the hands 
of the Trustees was $7,500. 

In accordance with the terms of the will we have transmitted to the 
Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina $2,500 and to the Trustees of 
Gethsemane Baptist Church in the Roanoke Association $2,500. We 
hold $2,500, given by the terms of the will for the purpose of State 
Mission work in the Roanoke Association, subject to the disposition 
of the General Board of the State Convention. 

In connection with the issue of bonds known as Meredith College 
bonds, Mr. Wilson Lewis of St. Louis resigned as individual trustee, 
and the Trustees agreed to the appointment of Mr. W. C. Bitting, Jr., 



Annual of Session 1936 25 

in his stead. All this was done in accordance with the terms of the 
indenture. 

As required by the Convention we found upon examination that the 
Treasurer is bonded for $25,000, the bookkeeper. Miss Esther Ivey, for 
$10,000, and the bookkeeper of the Debt Service Fund, Miss Margie 
Murchison, for $10,000. 

24. A discussion of the resolution adopted in connection with the report of 
the Committee to nominate Trustees of the Convention, Its Institutions and 
members of the General Board at the 1935 Convention (see page 54, section 
78) insued with W. H. Moore, Wadesboro, asking for an interpretation. The 
chair ruled that it was the intent of the Convention that beginning with this 
Convention no individual would serve on two or more Boards or Institutions.* 

Song : "My Hope is Built". 

25. Arch C. Cree, Salisbury, brought to a close this session that had for its 
theme The Church in Service to Its Membership and Community with an 
address on the subject, "The Church in Service to the Community". 

26. Adjournment thereafter came when A. J. Barton, Wilmington, prayed. 



WEDNESDAY— Morning Session 

The Church In Service to the People of the State 

27. At 9 :00 o'clock, Horace Easom led the audience in singing "Jesus 
Saves" and "I'll Go Where You Want Me to Go", whereupon Vice-President 
John H. Coley, Rocky Mount, now presiding called upon Nane Starnes, Ashe- 
ville, who led the morning devotions assisted in prayer by E. Gibson Davis, 
Asheville and by Edward E. Rutledge, Charlotte, who sang, "I Have a 
Savior". 

28. The latest registration figures were read by the Secretary totalling 554. 

29. C. B. Deane, Rockingham, read in behalf of the Baptist Historical 
Commission its report (see page 90, section 138) and moved its acceptance 
to be approved after Mrs. Ethel T. Crittenden, Librarian, Wake Forest College 
spoke on the priceless Baptist Collection at Wake Forest and other features 
in the report. 

30. In the absence of the Secretary of the North Carolina Baptist Founda- 
tion, M. A. Huggins made mention of the report (see page 91, section 139) 
and upon his motion the report was adopted after brief comments from Oscar 
Haywood, C. L. Dowell, and Wilson Woodcock. 

31. Reversing a former ruling President Wall inserted this statement: 

After further thought, the Chair wishes to revise a ruling made hastily 
yesterday, with the request that this ruling be made a matter of record 
in the proceedings of the Convention. 

The motion passed last year, that there shall be no duplication in the 
personnel of the Boards and Committees of the Convention, was intended 
to establish a policy to be effective zvhen and as such policy could become 
operative without doing violence to or contravening any former act of 
the Convention. In the nature of the case such motion could not be 
retroactive concerning the term of office of any person already elected 
for a definite period of service on any Board and properly and legally 
serving under the Constitution of the Convention and the Charter of 
any institution. 

If there had been no constitutional provision concerning the personnel 
of Boards and Committees, this motion would have established a rule. 
In that case, as terms of office expired from year to year the policy 
sought to be established by the motion could have been duly regarded 



See revised ruling page 25, section 31. 



26 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

by the Committee on Nominations and made operative by the Convention 
in its elections. 

But the Chair would now remind the Convention of a fact that was 
overlooked both by the Chair and by the Convention when the motion 
referred to was adopted, namely, that the evident intent of the motion 
referred to is virtually embodied already in the Constitution. Art. VII, 
Section 2, provides that the Boards of the Convention and of Institu- 
tions affiliated with the Convention shall be distributed as widely as 
practicable both as to territory and individuals. Manifestly, the adop- 
tion of a motion, affecting a matter imbedded in the Constitution, could 
not displace or take precedence of the Constitution itself. The motion 
should have taken the form of a Constitutional Amendment. 

The Chair would suggest that if it is the will of the Convention to 
establish a fixed rule that in no case shall the name of any individual 
appear more than once on the roster of the Boards of the Convention 
and of Institutions affiliated with the Convention, it would be proper to 
amend Art. VII, Section 2, by changing the wording to this effect. 

The Chair would also remind the Convention that under Art. VII, 
Sec. 7, providing the method of amending the Constitution, such amend- 
ment may be adopted at this session, within the discretion of the Con- 
vention, if the brother who made the motion last year, or any other 
member of the Convention, gives proper notice during today's sessions 
so that final action may be taken at any session tomorrow. 

32. Immediately W. H. Moore, Wadesboro, gave notice that on tomorrow 
he would offer a resolution to amend the Constitution to the end that no 
individual be named on more than one Board or Institution of the Convention. 

33. At this hour the Department of Missions was the regular order with 
General Secretary Huggins presiding and leading the discussions. Prior to 
the adoption of the report (see page 57, section 106), the Convention 
heard the General Secretary comment upon Missionary Pastoral Assistance, 
Missionary Pastors, Progress in Church Building, and the work among 
Robeson County Indians. Missionaries M. C. Lunseford and Mrs. Lunse- 
ford to the Indians received the Convention's recognition. 

(a) Next, E. M. Harris, Aberdeen, spoke of the work he is doing at 
the State Sanatorium and at Samarcand as projected in a small degree by 
the State Mission Board. 

(b) He was followed by W. C. Somerville, General Secretary of the 
Negro Baptist State Convention in a report on the work among the Negroes 
expressing thankfulness for the splendid aid given the Negro Baptists by this 
Convention. 

34. Then came M. L. Skaggs, Buie's Creek, who made the report as 
Chairman of the Committee to recommend a Program to aid Former Prisoners, 
and adopted upon motion by the speaker. 

A PROGRAM TO AID FORMER PRISONERS 

Many thoughful people are raising significant questions regarding 
the group of our population who have served time in our penal institu- 
tions. They would like to know what becomes of the prisoner who is 
released from our institutions. Your committee has tried to approach 
this problem in a spirit of helpfulness toward this unfortunate group. 

I. The conditions facing us — 

The magnitude of the problem of the former prisoners is challeng- 
ing, and it is growing. There were 3.73 times as many prisons com- 
mitted to prison in 1932 as in 1920; however, there was an increase in 
population from 1920 to 1930 of only 23.9 per cent. The number of 



Annual of Session 1936 27 

prisoners released in 1931 was 5,466. For 1934, the number was 7,236 ;■ 
and for the first half of 1936. 9,970. By far the greater number of 
these were young men, and the tragedy is that the average age is 
decreasing. The average age of prisoners committed from 1913 to 
1926 was approximately 26 years. The average for the last five years 
is about 23 years. Of all white prisoners committed from 1917 
to 1922, 23.5 per cent were 20 years old or younger. 

The economic conditions surrounding the released prisoners are a 
vital factor in their rehabilitation. Of the white prisoners discharged 
during the five-year period following 1917, 80 per cent of their families 
were near the poverty level, 90 per cent were receiving aid from some 
other source, and 67.1 per cent were unemployed. About three-fourths 
were unskilled laborers. More than half of the prisoners committed 
during January, February, and March, 1936 had no vocational train- 
ing. The result almost invariably is either casual employment, un- 
suitable employment or positive unemployment. Most of the average 
crimes the prison records reveal for the biennium were committed in 
urban sections. This is a challenge to the church people of our cities. 

The church relationship of the prisoners is of great interest to us. 
Most of them belong to our denomination, and for two major reasons: 
first, there are more Baptists in North Carolina than any other religious 
sect; and, secondly, the prisoners belong to the lower economic level. 
Of all the white prisoners incarcerated from 1917 to 1922, 92.5 per cent, 
were not members of any church. Of all prisoners in chain gangs in 
1927, more than 50 per cent had been members of some church. The 
drink habit was connected with 56.1 per cent of the crimes of all white 
prisoners released during the five year period after 1917, and 97.4 per 
cent of these used alcohol beverages after their release. Direct con- 
tacts by a representative of our churches would have saved a great 
many of this number. 

The educational status of the prisoners is a revelation. One-fourth 
of them have had no educational training. Of the families of the 1917 
to 1922 group two-thirds were not sending their children to school. Of 
the 4,820 prisoners incarcerated during the first three months of this 
year (1936"), 1,062 have had no schooling. Many of the prisoners can 
be saved yet because of their low age and the brevity of their sentences. 

It is important to note that the tendency toward crime is cumulative. 
Juvenile delinquency was found to exist among most of them. The 
greater number of them came from disrupted homes where evil influences 
were weighing ever heavier on their lives. Approximately 32 per cent 
of those discharged are soon returned to prison, almost half of them 
having committed at least two more crimes since their release. They 
simply have not repented. 

The released prisoners of our state are being neglected. Their after- 
prison life is simply a continuation of their pre-prison life. Their prison 
life has had little effect on them for the better. It has neither reformed 
them nor deterred them from crime. Our regular church services are 
not reaching them. Our social clubs are not reaching them, and the 
legally established agencies responsible for them are not reaching them 
because of their inadequacy. The present Commissioner of Paroles 
states that the situation is still deplorable. 

II. Our present efforts to aid the former prisoners — 

Our denomination is making no direct contribution to the moral 
and spiritual salvation of this group. 

III. A suggested program — 

1. At the earliest possible moment employ a paid worker who would : 

(a) Do personal work among the former prisoners. 

(b) Co-ordinate the work of the churches on this problem by asso- 
ciations. 

(c) Contact parole and penal authorities. 

2. Urge the State to broaden the field of vocational training for our 
prisoners. 



28 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

3. Give fuller support to the parole system. 

4. Make an appeal to the public at large to help us in this chal- 
lenging task — through the Press, other denominations and civic clubs. 

5. Encourage our churches to work with the families of the former 
prisoners. 

6. Secure specialists in this field to speak to our Brotherhood meet- 
ings, Sunday School classes, etc. 

7. Encourage employment of the prisoners. 

8. Organize "Big Brother" clubs in our Sunday Schools. 

9. Co-operate with county Welfare Organizations in salvaging the 
prisoners. 

10. Urge the State to provide better supervision of probationers. 

11. Insist upon better enforcement of the compulsory school attend- 
ance law. 

12. Develop a more tolerant and sympathetic attitude on the part 
of our people toward the former prisoners. Let us teach them to "hate 
the sin but love the sinner." We must exercise something of the spirit 
of the Galilean and say to these human tragedies, "We are your brothers 
and your sisters, 'Go thou and sin no more'." 

35. In keeping with the order of Business the Convention at this 11:00 
o'clock hour, November 11, 1936 stood silently in a Memorial or Armistice 
Day Service with Mrs. Carpenter playing "Taps" at the organ. Cleveland 
Holland, World War Chaplain afterwards offered the prayer. 

36. Special musical selections were next offered by the Kennedy Home 
High School Choral Club under the direction of John Biggs Alderman. The 
numbers included "The King of Love My Shepherd Is", a reading "I Am 
Music" by Miss Elizabeth Smith, and closed with "Holy Is the Lord". Miss 
Bertha Earp and Mrs. J. C. Pate assisted at the organ and piano, respectively. 

37. The regular order now appeared with B. W. Spilman, Kinston repre- 
senting Eastern North Carolina, B. E. Morris, the Piedmont section of the 
State and Wayne Williams, Western Carolina, who assisted the General 
Secretary in discussing State Mission Opportunities. 

38. "Hymn of Love", was the song here sung by the forty-eight boys 
and girls from the Kennedy Home. 

Song : "When I Survey the Wondrous Cross". 

39. O. T. Binkley, Chapel Hill, preached the noon hour sermon and his 
theme was "The Church at Worship." 

40. Adjourment followed after prayer by R. N. Simms, Raleigh. 

WEDNESDAY— Afternoon Session 

"The Church In Service to Those In Need'' 

41. "Pass Me Not" was the opening song of this session and E. H. 
Potts, Elizabeth City, led the devotions. 

42. Vice-President B. E. Morris was presiding at this time and announced 
the latest registration at 738. 

43. In keeping with the will of the 1935 Convention (See page 55, 
section 80) the Convention heard the Committee report, being an amendment 
to the Constitution changing the Convention's date of meeting. Chairman 
T. H. King, Clinton, read and moved the adoption of the amendment which 
upon vote became a part of the Constitution as follows : 

That in Article III, Section 1, the word second in the second line 
be omitted and the word third be inserted.* 

44. There was received, with President Wall now presiding, from another 
special Committee named at the 1935 Convention, (see page 57, section 88) 
a report IN Re The Biblical Recorder. This report follows, read and upon 
the motion of J. L. Peacock, Tarboro, accepted : 

* Under Constitutional Authority, Article VII, Section 6 the 1937 Convention will 
meet on Tuesday after the second Sunday in November. 



Annual of Session 1936 29 

REPORT OF BIBLICAL RECORDER COMMITTEE 

The Biblical Recorder Committee cannot make a complete report 
to the Convention this year. 

Your committee was unfortunate in having its chairman, Dr. Charles 
H. Durham, resign two months ago. Up to that time no meeting of the 
committee had been held. When a new chairman had been appointed, 
steps were immediately taken to call the committee together. Three 
meetings have been held, one of which was held in conjunction with the 
Directors of the Biblical Recorder Publishing Company. 

At that meeting a proposition was made that will require further 
consideration. 

Your committee would, therefore, ask that the committee be permitted 
to continue for another year and that any vacancy which may occur be 
filled by the president of the Convention, keeping the number of the 
committee at seven. 

Your committee endorses the Triple Plan for increasing the number 
of subscribers to the Biblical Recorder and urges the pastors and 
churches of the Convention to adopt the plan as outlined by the field rep- 
resentative, R. F. Terrell, that the paper may accomplish its purpose in 
disseminating information concerning the work of the Convention and 
our missionary enterprises at home and abroad to the Baptists of 
the state. 

Respectfully submitted for the Committee, 

J. L. Peacock, Chairman. 

45. Superintendent I. G. Greer read the Orphanage Report (see page 84, 
section 133) and moving its adoption offered first a quartet of Mills Home 
girls, Ruby Byerly, and Alary Belle Jarrell, Davidson County, Elma Harward, 
Wilkes County, and Delia Mae Watson, Johnston County, who sang "The 
Heart that was Broken for Me", and then introduced Johnson J. Hayes, Greens- 
boro, who discussed the orphanage report to be adopted in due course by 
the Convention. 

46. Again the Kennedy Home High School Choral Club sang, using the 
song, "The Holy City'. 

47. A discussion of the Baptist Hospital Report (see page 86, section 
134) read by Smith Hagaman, Superintendent, was opened by Miss Myrtle 
Barnette speaking primarily on the opportunity of the Nurse, followed by 
Mrs. Mae Matthews and J. A. McKaughan, recent Winston-Salem patients, 
who happily endorsed this report here adopted with great praise for the 
attention and relief they received while confined in the hospital. 

48. The Relief and Annuity work was received here when B. Frank Hasty, 
Field Representative of the Annuity Board, made his appointed speech. The 
discussion was carried further by A. D. Kinnett, Burlington and C. E. Baucom, 
Concord. An extra period of time was voted the guest speaker to touch on 
the National Social Security Law as it relates to the Relief and Annuity plan. 

49. A special resolution in the interest of Calvary Baptist Church, Raleigh, 
accepted by the General Board and not now included in the Advance Report of 
the General Board, was offered here as a matter of information and referred 
to the Committee to Report on General Boards Report. (See page 94, 
recommendation 7). 

50. Chairman J. F. Carter, Winston-Salem, made the report for the com- 
mittee on Place and Preacher and received the approval of the Convention 
to-wit : 

Place: To be determined by the General Board or its executive Committee. 
Preacher: Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem. 
Alternate: A. D. Kinnett, Burlington. 

51. A. J. Barton, moving adjournment, prayer was offered by R. L. Lemons 
and the session closed. 



30 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

WEDNESDAY— Evening Session 

The Church In Service To The People of America 

52. After singing "Faith of Our Fathers" the convention heard devotions 
as offered by C. E. Baucom, Concord to be continued with the choir of the 
host church singing under the direction of J. T. Holland. 

53. Other committees from the Committee on Committees were here named 
and by motion of A. D. Kinnett, Chairman, accepted. (See page 22, sec- 
tion 22). 

54. President Wall, Shelby, recognized his townsman and North Carolina's 
next Governor and a prominent Methodist, Layman Clyde R. Hoey, who was 
welcomed to the platform while the audience stood in greeting and acknowl- 
edgement from Mr. Hoey. 

55. Under the presiding offices of Vice-President W. D. Poe, Oxford, 
and thereafter with President Wall in the chair, Charles E. Brewer, Ra- 
leigh, as Chairman read the report from the Committee on Social Ser- 
vice and Civic Righteousness, and upon motion to adopt by the Com- 
mittee, Chairman Eugene Olive, North Wilkesboro, offered certain amend- 
ments. A prolonged discussion followed, to be ended after M. A. Huggins 
moved that the report and amendments be carried to the Thursday morn- 
ing session for disposition ; moreover such motion was withdrawn in favor 
of J. A. McKaughan's motion to be adopted which referred the amendment? 
back to the Committee to the end that a revised or new report be submitted 
Thursday Morning at 9:15. President Frank Graham, of the University of 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, upon invitation then spoke on the general theme 
of Social Service. 

56. The Choir of the host church again sang, this time "Seek Ye the 
Lord". 

57. In presenting the regular order Ira D. S. Knight, Durham, State Repre- 
sentative of the Home Mission Board read the Board's report to be adopted 
upon his motion following the Home Mission Address by Noble Y. Beall, 
Atlanta, Board Missionary to the Negro. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSION BOARD 

The missionary movement among our churches sets before us the task 
of making real the vision of Jesus Christ concerning the Kingdom of 
God. It desires to bring all people into a conscious relationship to God 
. and to one another, living together in Christian and brotherly love. 
The Home Mission Board is one of the several agencies of Southern 
Baptists engaged in this comprehensive enterprise of exalting God and 
Jesus Christ. 

The Home Mission Board is delighted to report real progress 
during the past year. Two years ago this Board had 200 missionaries. 
Today they have 313. This is great progress but we should have 1,000 
missionaries in the field during the next several years. 

General advancement is necessarily dependent upon financial increase. 
The income of the Home Mission Board during 1936 has been nearly 
11 per cent above the amount of money received during the previous 
year. All interest on the indebtedness has been paid and $91,151.20 
has been paid on the principal of indebtedness. All financial obligations 
have been met with cash during this year. This encouraging financial 
statement does not mean that ample funds are being received. Much 
more money is needed to carry forward this imperative work. But 
this encouraging financial situation does mean that the Home Mission 
Board is determined to carry on its work within its income on a cash 
basis. By this same policy the Home Mission Board will continue to 
conduct its work. 

The budget adopted for 1937 calls for the expenditure of $407,999. 
This Board will continue the established policy of not making any 
direct and specific appeals for designated funds. Designations that are 



Annual of Session 1936 31 

made without solicitations, but given as the response of the heart to the 
appeals of great spiritual needs, will be received and accredited as 
among the highest type of missionary giving. 

In all of our consideration of the Home Mission Board finances, 
especially when we think of debt, we should not fail to remember that 
this Board has a Church Building loan fund of approximately one and 
one-third million dollars. 

The greatest appeal of our Home Mission Board is not an appeal for 
money only. It is an appeal to our people to realize that we are living 
in a changing and rapidly growing Southland. Industry, with its chang- 
ing social complex, is rapidly making a new South. The foreigners 
in our midst are a mighty challenge to our missionary zeal. These will 
not have a chance to know Christ if we do not enlarge our missionary 
program. This foreign problem in our midst should be realized. 
Within the bounds of the Southern Baptist Convention there are thirty 
million people of native white parentage. The foreign and alien peoples 
within our Southern boundaries are approximately 5,000,000. Our Home 
Mission work also includes the four western provinces of Cuba, wherein 
live two and one-half million people, and also the fifty thousand 
living in the Panama Canal Zone. 

The foreigner in our midst is one of our greatest Home Mission 
opportunities. Last year, for the first time in our national history, 
more foreigners left the shores of our nation than came into the 
United States. More than one hundred thousand went back ; only 
forty-six thousand came. Every one of the one hundred thousand who 
returned to his native land, returned as a missionary. But did we send 
them back as Christian missionaries? Much of our foreign mission 
problem can be solved by the Home Mission Board being given the 
means whereby they can save the foreigner in our midst. 

A brief report cannot include extended reference to the work among 
our deaf mutes, Indians, Jews and Negroes, nor the work done through 
our City Missions and Good Will Centers, nor the helpful work among 
the mountaineers. This vast missionary enterprise cannot continue upon 
the Christian zeal and momentum of the past. Each rising generation 
must be fired with new zeal. The successes of the past demand increas- 
ing activities in the present. 

The immediate expression to the increasing activity of the Home 
Mission Board is the recent election of Dr. Roland Q. Leavell as Super- 
intendent of Evangelism. He will begin his work January 1, 1937. This 
new work will be done in co-operation with the Sunday School Board. 
His salary is being provided by the Bottoms Trust Fund, of the Home 
Mission Board. It should be the prayer of all Southern Baptists that the 
leadership of Dr. Leavell will be used for a new evangelistic awakening 
within our borders which shall overflow to the uttermost parts of the 
earth. 

We thank God for the sane, aggressive, Christian leadership of 
Dr. J. B. Lawrence. We rejoice in the crown of success which is placed 
upon the labors of all the faithful Home Mission workers. Gratitude is 
given to the W. M. U. for the work they have made possible through 
the Annie W. Armstrong offering each month of March. Praise is also 
given to the debt payments made possible by the One Hundred Thousand 
Club. But every individual Baptist should realize that the chief financial 
support for all of the mission work of our denomination comes through 
the individual offering of every individual Baptist, every week of the 
year, to the comprehensive Co-operative Program. 

58. Clyde R. Hoey, Shelby, offered prayer thereafter and this session 
ended. 

THURSDAY— Morning Session 

The Church Training Christian Leaders 

59. Horace Eason led with the Convention singing "Take Time to 
Be Holy". 



32 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

60. C. E. Ruffin, Ellerbe led the devotion. 

61. President Wall recognized J. M. Hilliard, High Point one of the 
Convention's oldest and most faithful messengers from year to year. 

Song : "Come Thou Almighty King." 

62. J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro offered a special prayer for the program 
of this day. 

63. A. J. Barton, Wilmington, moved and the Convention instructed the 
Secretary to forward to W'm. D. Upshaw, Asheville, a message and associated 
with this thought a prayer was offered by Brother Barton. 

Durham, N. C. 
November 12, 1936. 
Wm. D. Upshaw, 
Asheville, N. C. 

North Carolina Baptists in One Hundred Sixth Annual Session recalled 
today your remarkable and praiseworthy life and prayed for your early 
return to good health. 

Charles B. Deane, 
Recording Secretary. 

64. The Convention received from Charles E. Brewer, Chairman, under 
a previous order (see page 30, section 55) the report of the Committee 
on Social Service and Civic Righteousness, together with the amendments to 
it referred. This report again provoked extended debate and after the Con- 
ventions vote on the amendments not included in the report the original 
report with the approved amendments were accepted as follows : 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL SERVICE AND 
CIVIC RIGHTEOUSNESS 

Thoughtful observers note with growing apprehension certain tendencies 
of our time. One of these is the world-wide large-scale preparation for war. 
Nothing like it has ever been known. Former optimism has given place to 
gloom and fear. Although in recent years our own country has avoided the 
threat of war, we look with growing concern upon our warlike preparations. 
And we express the conviction that our leaders should cultivate mutual under- 
standing with all nations so as to make war less probable. Particularly do we 
voice our concern over such facts as those revealed by the Senate investiga- 
tion of munitions manufacturers, and we urge that effective steps be taken to 
curb their sinister influence. 

*[We voice strongly the conviction that as Christians we can have no part 
in the crossing of International Boundaries in war. We protest vigorously 
against compulsory military training of our youth, and we urge the nationaliza- 
tion of the manufacture of all munitions.] 

Another cause for apprehension is the great increase of crime. Recent dis- 
closures show that criminals are highly organized and that they operate on a 
scale hitherto unknown. In the decade from 1924 to 1934 the number of per- 
sons confined in penitentiaries and reformatories more than doubled, their being 
158,000 in 1934. The average jail population in the United States is 200,000. 
The cost of fighting crime and protecting society against criminals is said to 
reach the staggering annual total of $14,000,000,000. It is of grave importance 
that so little is done to reclaim criminals while in prison, or to rehabilitate them 
after release. We believe that efforts along these lines should be encouraged. 

*[1. At the earliest possible moment employ a paid worker who would: 

(a) Do personal work among the former prisoners. 

(b) Co-ordinate the work of the churches on this problem by associations. 

(c) Contact parole and penal authorities. 

* Amendments in brackets agreed upon by the Convention and edited at the request of 
the Secretary, by Charles E. Brewer, Committee Chairman, Eugene Olive, presenter of 
amendments, and A. J. Barton. 



Annual of Session 1936 33 

2. Urge the State to broaden the held of vocational training for our 
prisoners. 

3. Give fuller support to the parole system. 

4. Make an appeal to the public at large to help us in this challenging 
task— through the Press, other denominations and civic clubs. 

5. Encourage our churches to work with the families of the former 
prisoners. 

6. Secure specialists in this field to speak to our Brotherhood meetings, 
Sunday School classes, etc. 

7. Encourage employment of the prisoners. 

8. Organize "Big Brother" clubs in our Sunday Schools. 

9. Co-operate with county Welfare Organizations in salvaging the prisoners. 

10. Urge the State to provide better supervision of probationers. 

11. Insist upon better enforcement of the compulsory school attendance law. 

12. Develop a more tolerant and sympathetic attitude on the part of our 
people toward the former prisoners. Let us teach them to "hate the sin but 
love the sinner". We must exercise something of the spirit of the Galilean 
and say to these human tragedies, "We are your brothers and your sisters, 
'Go thou and sin no more'."] 

The administration of justice is of prime importance to social welfare. 
Laws are made for the general good. Most persons are law-abiding. A small 
part of the population is actually lawless. We commend certain of our judges 
for their impartial and effective handling of cases tried before them and their 
manifest concern for society. We believe that heavier penalties should be ad- 
ministered for such crimes as drunken driving, driving after revocation of 
license, and for violation of the liquor laws. We hope that greater efforts will 
be made to insure certain and swift penalties for guilty persons. In line with 
this, we strongly deprecate legal malpractice which obstructs justice by unneces- 
sary delays, gross abuse of the right of appeal, and the use of legal technical- 
ities to clear the guilty. We believe that such revision of court procedure as 
will check abuses and provide for more effective administration of justice is 
highly desirable. 

The present liquor situation in America is tragic in the extreme. By the 
free use of money, by false propaganda, and by campaign promises, soon to be 
forgotten, the prohibition amendment was repealed. The United States govern- 
ment then became the advocate of the liquor business, openly fostering the use 
of alcoholic liquors for the sake of revenue. In our own state, the last legisla- 
ture in its closing days, overriding the will, of the people as expressed by 184,- 
000 majority in the last election, treacherously destroyed our temperance legis- 
lation and provided for the operation of liquor stores in several counties of the 
state. The results of this unwarranted action are seen in the great increase of 
drunkenness, particularly in the wet counties. In the past year over six thou- 
sand drivers' licenses have been revoked, most of them for drunken driving. 
The menace of the roads is due in some degree to beer sold in hundreds of 
places where even in the days of the saloon it was not found. A highly financed 
advertising campaign is keeping alcoholic beverages before the public. We 
deplore the fact that some of our daily papers in the state are a party to this 
effort at wholesale debauchery. Particularly do we condemn the deliberate 
effort to induce women and youth to drink. We urge our ministers and the 
denominational press to keep our people informed about the evils of drink and 
about the present issue. Especially do we commend the State Department of 
Education for its effort to provide suitable temperance instruction in the 
schools. The United Dry Forces of the state are carrying on their work under 
the leadership of Mr. Cale Burgess of Raleigh. We express to him our 
appreciation for his unselfish service in the cause of temperance and we urge 
our people to support his organization in its work. 

We note with satisfaction the improved quality of moving pictures. This is 
doubtless due to the efforts of certain agencies advocating reform. The im- 
provement came gradually as it appeared that the public appreciated clean 
shows. We believe that all Christians should discourage the production of 
salacious plays and those that feature crime. This can best be done by not 



34 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

patronizing them. We also believe that they should co-operate in all practical 
ways to secure further improvement in the quality of screen plays. 

The secularization of the sabbath is a matter of grave concern. Indirectly it 
is of great social importance. Christian citizenship is the highest citizenship. 
The best Christian citizenship depends on worship and active support of the 
church and its activities. Sabbath desecration interferes with these, thus 
handicapping the church in its efforts to Christianize the social order by de- 
veloping Christian personalities to function in society. We strongly urge our 
people both by precept and by example to help save the sabbath for its God- 
given purpose. 

We believe that, on the whole, race relations are improving. The right of 
Negroes to act as jurymen is now definitely conceded. Participation in court 
procedure will be beneficial to them and will tend in time to overcome hurtful 
race prejudices. We condemn mob action, especially that which involves lynch- 
ing. If national action in this matter is to be long deferred, the states must 
handle the lynching problem more effectively. The success of the G-men in 
dealing with crime shows what could be done in dealing with lynchers. We 
urge our officials and officers to put forth every possible effort to stamp the 
blot of lynching from our civilization. 

We are chiefly concerned with the moral and spiritual phases of our life. 
But these are closely related to economic conditions. A large percent of our 
population have too little income to allow them to develop personality in whole- 
some ways. The poor and defenseless are put at great disadvantage by the 
economically powerful. This is a matter of serious concern to Baptists.* [We 
believe that this condition will persist until our social order can be brought 
under control of the Christian stewardship motive. We believe that Baptists 
should give this matter serious consideration in an effort to find a more 
Christian economy.] We are still largely rural. Our country churches depend 
on the quality of country life. Whatever seriously affects farm life affects 
our churches. We view with alarm the growth of tenancy, enhancing as it does 
the problems of soil depletion, education of a mobile population, and the matter 
of church affiliation. We look with favor upon any efforts made to improve 
country life. 

We note with much interest the launching of a movement to combat venereal 
diseases in state and nation. Too long have Christians been indifferent to this 
evil, the extent of which was revealed for the first time in the selective draft 
for the World War. It has now reached such proportions as to be a real 
menace to our civilization. W T e hereby express to the State Board of Health 
our hearty approval of its work. 

' Our changing civilization and the lowering of moral ideals are working 
havoc with the American home. Some of the best features of the older family 
are gone, probably never to return. Regular worship and religious training are 
largely things of the past. Divorce, itself, a symptom of more radical evils, is 
rapidly increasing. The family as an institution is becoming more and more 
unstable. We affirm our conviction that Christian principles alone can save 
the family and the home for their high social purposes. 

Finally, we express our firm belief that these and all other social ills can be 
successfully dealt with only by the recognition of the saving power of Jesus 
Christ and hearty acceptance of Him by Christian people as Lord of their lives. 

Charles E. Brewer, Chairman, 

J. C. Hough, 

R. H. Satterfield, 

W. K. McGee, 

E. M. Harris, 

F. A. Bower, 
Mrs. D. C. Martin, 



* Amendments in brackets agreed upon by the Convention and edited at the request 
of the Secretary, by Charles E. Brewer, Committee Chairman, Eugene Olive, presenter 



of amendments, and A. J. Barton. 



Annual of Session 1936 35 

65. In keeping with proper notice W. H, Moore, Wadesboro, moved and 
the Convention accepted this additional amendment to the Constitution. 

That Article VI, Section 1, be amended by the addition of the fol- 
lowing paragraph, to be designated as paragraph G, to-wit : That no 
individual shall serve on any Board or Institution who is at the same 
time holding membership on any Board or Institution. 

66. At this hour W» Perry Crouch, Secretary of the Department of Chris- 
tian Education introduced the topic Christian Education, which first included 
a discussion of the Sunday School Board, Nashville, Term., by its General 
Manager J. O. Williams, afterwards Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro, and 
Nane Starnes, Asheville, spoke for the Baptist Bible Institute and Southwestern 
Baptist Theological Seminary, respectively. These speakers preceded J. B. 
Weatherspoon, of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, who addressed 
the Convention on Christian and Theological Education. 

Song: "Jesus, I My Cross Have Taken". 

67. Reports (see page 77), came from our Baptist Colleges at this time 
as General Secretary Huggins introduced these representative speakers : W. 
R. Cullom, Wake Forest ; Charles E. Brewer, Meredith ; Robert L. Moore, 
Mars Hill ; and Leslie H. Campbell, Campbell. 

68. The General Secretary made mention of Wingate Junior College and 
Boiling Springs, two additional State Baptist Schools, and recognized their 
Presidents : James B. Little and George Burnette. 

69. W. P. Few, President of Duke University, was recognized and warmly 
welcomed at this time. 

70. R. W. Simms read the following resolution to be adopted by the 
Convention. 

GOLDEN JUBILEE OF CAMPBELL COLLEGE 

Whereas, Campbell College has entered upon its Fiftieth Year of 
continuous service; and 

Whereas, the Golden Jubilee of the College will be celebrated in 
June, 1937; and 

Whereas, thousands of students have been the recipients of the educa- 
tional and character-building benefits made available to the sons and 
daughters of North Carolina ; and 

Whereas, the students and graduates of Campbell College are 
rendering conspicuous service in all walks of life ; in the vocations ; the 
professions and as workers in the life of the Baptist Denomination, and 
as inspirational leaders among the Baptist Clergy of the State and 
Nation ; and 

Whereas, the College with the vision of larger service to mankind is 
projecting its program of expansion and endowment for the future, — 

Now, Therefore, Be it Resolved by the North Carolina Baptist 
State Convention in its 106th Annual Session, convening in Durham, 
North Carolina, that the felicitations of the Convention are hereby ten- 
dered to Campbell College, not only for the Golden Jubilee Year, but 
for the future, that beckons to an enlarged and ever expanding service 
to the Denomination and to the Southland. 

Be it Further Resolved, That the State Convention which spon- 
sors and fosters the College as an important division of its educational 
life, with its congratulations on the half century, pledges its sympathetic 
interest and co-operation, as the spirit and ideals of Campbell go 
forward down into the Century. 

Submitted by 

T. H. King, Forrest C. Feezor, 

B. W. Spilman, Eugene Olive, 

S. N. Lamb, S. L. Morgan, 

Chas. B. Howard, John E. Lanier. 



36 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

71. In further recognition of this celebration. President Wall named R. 
N. Simms, Raleigh ; D. B. Bryan, Wake Forest ; and Eugene Olive, North 
W'ilkesboro as a committee to attend the Golden Jubilee of Campbell as 
personal representatives of the Convention. 

72. "Christian Education and the World Situation" was the subject address 
that closed the discussion on Christian Education by Sankey L. Blanton, Wil- 
mington and afterwards upon motion by J. S. Farmer, Raleigh the report of 
Christian Education was adopted. 

73. M. A. Huggins under miscellaneous told of efforts put forth by 
Charles H. Dickey and himself in securing an option on the George W. 
Truett Homestead, of 80 acres, in Western North Carolina and solicited the 
interest of the Convention in the acquisition of the property for North Carolina 
Baptists. A collection was received toward the purchase price of $2,500.00 and 
upon motion by J. S. Farmer, the Convention instructed the General Secre- 
tary to take such additional steps as necessary that title to the property be 
perfected in the Convention.* 

Song : "Stand Up for Jesus". 

74. The sermon coming at this noon hour was preached by Ralph A. 
Herring, Winston-Salem whose subject was "The Home, the Source of 
Christian Leaders." 

J. W. Lynch, Wake Forest prayed and the session ended. 

THURSDAY— Afternoon Session 

The Church Enlisted In World Wide Service 

75. A. Lincoln Fulk, led the devotion accompanied by Mrs. Carpenter at the 
organ after Horace Easom led in the singing of "I Gave My Life for Thee". 

76. On behalf of the Publicity Committee, Chairman Charles H. Dickey 
read and on his motion the report that follows was approved. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PUBLICITY 

During the past conventional year this department has had access 
to nearly all of the one hundred and fifty newspapers in this State, 
together with the two great press associations. Items of interest have 
constantly gone out over the wires and through the mails to these 
mediums of news dissemination. It may be fairly said that the State 
has been kept rather well informed about what the Baptists of North 
Carolina have been doing. 

The news gathering organizations in this State have been most gen- 
erous with the space which they have constantly placed at the disposal 
of our denomination. It can be said as of today that we have reached 
that place in our publicity work where the newspapers of this State 
are glad to publish anything when we have anything to say. Their treat- 
ment of this convention has demonstrated that. 

For the year that lies out ahead of us it may be said that one hun- 
dred and fifty newspapers, two big press associations and all the radio 
broadcasting stations in the State are at our reasonable disposal. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles H. Dickey. 

77. In keeping with the positive position of North Carolina Baptists, 
Johnson J. Hayes, Greensboro, read and upon his motion the following reso- 
lution which was unanimously passed. 

Believing as we do that legalizing liquor in any form — under what- 
ever device or name — will inevitably result in increased consumption of 
liquor with all its attendant evils, and will neither stop nor check 
bootlegging, we the messengers in attendance at the Baptist State 

* Deed of acquisition tiled for recordation Clay County, North Carolina. 



Annual of Session 1936 37 

Convention, most respectfully and earnestly petition the General Assem- 
bly of North Carolina, in accordance with the expressed will of the 
voters of the State, to make it unlawful to manufacture or sell in- 
toxicating beverages within this State. It is our considered judgment 
that revenue to be derived from legalizing the traffic is unworthy 
to be compared to the wealth wasted, lives marred, character im- 
paired, homes molested, and spirits crushed. 

A copy of this resolution shall be sent by the Secretary of this Con- 
vention to the President of the Senate and Speaker of the House of 
our next General Assembly. 

78. W. D. Poe offered the report for the Needy, Aged, and Infirm 
Committee and confirmed hereafter by his motion. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON AGED AND INFIRM 

Your Committee desires to re-emphasize the suggestions made in its 
1934 report to the effect that we owe a distinct duty to render helpful 
assistance to the Aged and Infirm. In view of the unsettled situation 
as to the governmental pension program, we deem it unwise to make 
any specific recommendation upon this question at this time. This further 
delay is, in our opinion, the best course to pursue, lest there should be a 
duplication or a conflict in plans and purposes. We do urge, however, 
that the local churches give special attention to their needly old people 
so that their last days may be made as happy as possible. 

It is our further opinion that this subject should be kept before the 
Convention until the situation is more settled and a definite program 
can be adopted. 

Our investigation discloses that more than 400 homes for the Aged 
and Infirm are now operated in 40 states by 25 different denominations. 
The Baptists have 20 such homes. 

Some of these homes are small, sheltering less than 25 persons ; 
some have more than 200 people each ; and a number of the homes are 
maintained solely for ministers and their widows, and other church 
workers. Our Methodist brethren have 45 such homes, but none of 
them are exclusively ministers' homes. 

More than half the homes have no entrance fee. Some have a fee, 
but do not refuse admission to any worthy person when resources permit. 
About half the homes have a provision for life members, with a fixed 
payment made by the applicants or by others for them. More than 
27,000 aged people are cared for in these homes at a cost of more than 
eight million dollars annually. 

One Home describes its benefits as follows : 

"Each person is given a cheerful, well-furnished private room, 
with furnace heat and electric lights. Also, the use of the pleasant 
living rooms, freedom of the grounds, and every privilege that 
goes with real family life. Each member is guaranteed comfort- 
able support, wholesome food, competent medical care and nurs- 
ing, and at death, Christian burial . . . unless interment is other- 
wise provided." 

North Carolina Baptists waited a long time before they undertook 
the care of the orphan child. Many fatherless and friendless children 
were bound out by the Courts and countless others went hungry and 
cold and unlettered. Now everybody is interested in the orphan. We 
have been made richer in soul by the love and money we have given to 
these children. 

Equally helpless with the orphan are the worn out and penniless 
men and women of our land. And we cannot claim soul honesty until 
we have volunteered our assistance to these silent old people who are 
too feeble to work, too poor to live decently, and too proud to beg. A 
Baptist in a poor house, by whatever name it is called, raised a question 
that is difficult for us to answer. We cannot divide the Gospel into 



38 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

evangelistic and social. The Gospel is for the whole man, it matters not 

where or when his need is. 

We recommend, therefore, that: 

The Convention name a Committee to confer with life Com- 
mittees to be appointed by the Orphanage Trustees and by the 
Hospital Trustees and that this joint Committee report with recom- 
mendation on this subject at the next Convention. 

79. At the request of Secretary Huggins the Convention advised that this 
order be observed In Re the recommendations of the General Board. 
In lieu of Recommendation 6, that there be inserted the special resolution 
for the refinancing of the Convention Indebtedness ; that the resolution in the 
interest of Calvary Baptist Church, Raleigh be Recommendation 7 and that the 
goals of the Convention come as the last recommendation. 

80. Following immediately Chairman B. A. Bowers, Gastonia, reported 
for the Committee to report on General Boards Report and was upon motion 
passed : 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE REPORT 
OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

The progress made along all lines as indicated in the report of the 
General Board is most gratifying. The committee wishes to express 
appreciation of the fine spirit of co-operation existing in our churches. 
The above is shown in the increase in contributions and accessions to 
the churches. 

Mr. Huggins and those associated with him have rendered most 
excellent service to our denomination in the Master's cause. 

We recommend the adoption of the eight recommendations presented 
in the advanced report of the General Board as appearing on page 
93 ff as revised by the Convention. 

B. A. Bowers, Chairman, 

T. H. King, 

W. F. West, 

John T. Coley, 

W. H. Baucom. 

81. Adoption of the report from the Committee to nominate Trustees of 
the Convention, its Institutions and members of the General Board followed 
the reading of the report by E. Gibson Davis, Chairman and his motion to 
accept. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE TRUSTEES OF 

THE CONVENTION, ITS INSTITUTION AND 

MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

I. General Board — Members 

Term Expiring 1937 : Sankey L. Blanton, Wilmington, to succeed 
J. M. Kester, deceased; Dr. C. G. Powell, Ahoskie, to succeed Oscar 
Creech. 

Term Expiring 1938: R. E. Wall, Sanford, to succeed A. B. 
Wood, Maxton ; Broadus Wall, to succeed J. B. Grice. 

Term Expiring 1939 : LeRoy Martin, Raleigh ; Claude Gaddy, 
Raleigh ; Vance Browning, Bryson City ; Hugh A. Ellis, Wilson ; 
B. E. Morris, Durham ; S. F. Hudson, Red Springs ; H. S. Benfield, 
Lenoir ; E. S. Summers, Concord ; A. D. Kinnett, Burlington ; B. A. 
Bowers, Gastonia ; R. A. Kelly, Belmont ; Luther Little, Charlotte ; 
T. C. Johnson, Kinston ; R. M. Squires, Wake Forest ; Earl James, 
Elkin. 

II. Baptist State Convention — Trustees 

R. L. McMillan, Raleigh ; William Louis Poteat, Wake Forest ; 
F. H. Brooks, Smithfield. 



Annual of Session 1936 39 

III. Baptist Foundation — Directors 

Term Expiring 1938: Guy Carswell, Charlotte, to succeed J. R. 
Morgan. 

Term Expiring 1941 : J. R. Weatherspoon, Raleigh, to succeed Z. 
M. Caveness ; Irving Carlyle, Winston-Salem ; George Pennell, Ashe- 
ville. 

IV. Baptist Hospital — Trustees 

Term Expiring 1937 : Paul Johnson, Winston-Salem, to suc- 
ceed Dr. Wingate Johnson. 

Term Expiring 1940: Thurman D. Kitchin, Wake Forest; T. W. 
Blackwell, Winston-Salem ; B. F. Bray, Marion. 

V. Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina — Trustees 

Term Expiring 1939: Mrs. F. A. Bower, Kannapolis, to succeed 
Mrs. Fannie Moore. 

Term Expiring 1940: Zeno Wall, Shelby; H. S. Stokes, Winston- 
Salem; Mrs. Byron C. Scott, Charlotte; Robert A. Mclntyre, Lum- 
berton ; Glenn Choate, Salisbury. 

VI. Campbell College — Trustees 

Term Expiring 1939 : W. C. Downing. Fayetteville, N. C, to suc- 
ceed A. P. Stephens. 

Term Expiring 1940: D. T. Dickie, Henderson, to succeed Miss 
Mattie Bain : Santford Martin, Winston-Salem ; D. H. Senter, Chaly- 
beate Spring; W. H. Upchurch, Oxford; D. R. Perry, Durham. 

VII. Chowan College — Trustees 

Term Expiring 1940: J. L. White, Elizabeth City; Mrs. R. P. 
Morehead, Weldon ; P. J. Long, Jackson ; W. D. Boone, Winton ; 

B. H. Ward, Sunbury. 

VIII. Mars Hill College— Trustees 

Term Expiring 1937 : D. C. May, Durham to succeed G. H. Jones. 

Term Expiring 1938: C. M. Palmer, Albemarle to succeed W. C. 
McConnell ; W. T. Myers, Winston-Salem, to succeed J. R. Morgan. 

Term Expiring 1939 : T. L. Cashwell, Gastonia, to succeed R. K. 
Redwine, of Hickory. 

Term Expiring 1940: J. E. Efird, Charlotte; W. L. Griggs, 
Charlotte; C. M. Wall, Lexington; E. F. Watson, Burnsville; W. 
H. Wray, Gastonia ; Mrs. Rush Troup, Shelby. 

IX. Meredith College — Trustees 

Term Expiring 1937 : F. A. Bower, Kannapolis, to succeed B. A. 
Bowers. 

Term Expiring 1938: Henry Edwards, Shelby, to succeed Mrs. 
Lillie Morehead, Mebane. 

Term Expiring 1939 : Eph Whisenhunt, Elkin, to succeed William 
Dowd Poe. 

Term Expiring 1940 : Zebulcn Marvin Caveness, Raleigh ; Foy 
Johnson Farmer, Raleigh ; Annie Kitchin Josey, Scotland Neck ; 
James Yadkin Joyner, LaGrange ; Daniel Harris Penton, Wilmington ; 

C. T. Council, Durham. 

X. Wake Forest College — Trustees 

Term Expiring 1940 : Johnson J. Hayes, Greensboro ; A. J. Hut- 
chins, Canton ; John A. Oates, Fayetteville ; Herbert Peele, Eliza- 
beth City ; J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro ; A. D. Ward, New Bern ; 
B. M. W'atkins, Durham; J. C. Watkins, Winston-Salem; J. B. Willis, 
Hamlet; W. L. Wyatt, Raleigh. 

Signed : E. Gibson Davis, Chairman, J. T. Riddick, B. F. Bray, 
V. M. Dorsett, G. H. Jones, E. F. Hardin, Claude F. Gaddy, Jno. 
T. Coley, Mrs. W. W. Parker, and Mrs. W. K. McGee. 



40 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

82. Prior to the election of Convention officers President Zeno Wall sub- 
mitted this statement : 

Today "brings to a close my fourth year as President of this Con- 
vention, and a conviction that I should not permit you to nominate me 
for re-election. 

During these busy years I have tried to do at least four things : 

(1) Keep this great Convention together as "one body in Christ", 

(2) Run it on time, 

(3) Have a cheerful spirit in all of its sessions, and 

(4) Point out attainable goals. 

What success I have had, you will have to say. 
As I retire, I do so with sincere thanks to each and every one who 
has helped in carrying forward our programs and in writing the history 
of our denomination during these trying years. My appreciation of your 
honor and hearty co-operation is both deep and genuine, and my prayer 
is that the Holy Spirit will lead you to a more capable man than I 
have been, and into bigger and better days and years. 

Fraternally, 

ZENO WALL 

83. For Convention President J. T. Riddick nominated Ira D. S. Knight, 
Durham ; L. R. O'Brien, placed A. J. Barton, Wilmington ; E. Gibson, Davis, 
submitted R. N. Simms, Raleigh, and the nominations closed upon R. H. 
Satterrield's motion after Eugene Olive had nominated Wm. Louis Poteat, 
Wake Forest. 

84. President Wall named Hugh A. Ellis, E. Norfleet Gardner, Eph 
Whisenhunt, E. N. Royal and J. L. Jenkins as tellers to canvass the returns and 
that Forrest C. Feezor offer a prayer as the Convention elects its Twenty- 
ninth President. 

85. Leonard L. Morgan, Raleigh, became Convention Statistical Secretary 
upon the statement from Perry Morgan, Ridgecrest that his duties would pre- 
vent him serving, and upon motion by B. E. Morris, Durham.* 

86. A resolution was read by J. P. Harris, Maysville and his motion to 
adopt carried. 

RESOLUTION 

Whereas, many announcements and appeals to support special meals, 
promoted by various institutions and groups, consume so much valuable 
time of the convention and ofttimes dissipates the main thought of the 
convention. 

Therefore be it Resolved, that the Program Committee for each 
convention, working with the local church committee, make plans for 
the special meals by arranging time and place and publish same on a 
supplement to the program to be distributed to the Convention delegates, 
and that all such announcements and appeals be eliminated from the floor 
of the Convention. 

Song : "Jesus Savior Pilot Me". 

87. Clifton J. Allen, Statesville, addressed the Convention on the topic 
"A Worthy Financial Program for the Local Church." 

88. It was announced at this point that Wm. Louis Poteat, Wake Forest had 
received the majority vote of the Convention, and his election to the Presidency 
was made unanimous upon the motion of L. R. O'Brien. 

89. The Convention Vice-Presidents were named under one vote when 
nominated in this order : J. Ben Eller named R. N. Simms ; W. D. Early, 
Hoyt Blackwell, and E. N. Johnson, A. J. Barton. 



* Perry Morgan resigned as State Sunday School Secretary to assume on February 
1st, 1936, the Secretaryship of Southern Baptist Assembly work with immediate duties 
as Manager, Southern Baptist Assembly Grounds, Ridgecrest, North Carolina. 



Annual of Session 1936 41 

90. Resolutions from the standing Committee 'was heard and unanimously 
adopted upon motion by S. N. Lamb : 

RESOLUTION 

Resolved, That the Convention express by rising vote its hearty 
thanks : 

First, To this church and its pastor, and to the other Baptist Churches 
and pastors of this city, for the ample provision they have made for our 
comfort and convenience during these days. 

Second, To the daily papers for the splendid publicity given to the 
proceedings of the Convention. 

Third, To the police officers who have served so faithfully in front 
of the Church. 

Fourth, To all who have contributed towards the success of the 
Convention. 

J. Clyde Turner, Chairman, 
Ralph A. Herring, 
S. N. Lamb. 

91. As a special order R. X. Simms read the following resolution for 
the re-financing of the Convention Indebtedness and was duly adopted after 
motion by R. X. Simms. 

*A RESOLUTION 

Resolved by the Baptist State Convention of Xorth Carolina that 
for the purpose of refunding certain outstanding bonded and note in- 
debtedness of the Convention, in accordance with the report and recom- 
mendation of its General Board pertaining thereto, which is made a part 
hereof, and which was adopted at this session of the Convention, the 
Trustees of the Convention be and they are hereby authorized and em- 
powered to issue a note or notes in the name of the Convention to the 
Wachovia Bank & Trust Company in the principal amount of $350,000, 
same to bear interest at 4%, and to be payable over a period of five 
years ending not later than December 31, 1941; and further that the 
Trustees of the Convention be and they are hereby authorized and em- 
powered to issue in the name of the Convention bonds or notes to the 
Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Company, or other lending source, 
in the principal amount of $450,000, same to bear an interest rate of not 
over 5%, and to be payable over a period of fifteen years, with how- 
ever no principal payments to be made during the five year period end- 
ing December 31, 1941 ; 

And for the full and prompt payment of the principal and interest 
of such notes and bonds herein authorized to be issued when and as due, 
the full faith, credit and resources of the Convention are hereby irrevo- 
cably pledged ; 

That the General Board be and it is hereby fully authorized and em- 
powered to do all things whatsoever that may be necessary to perfect 
the said notes and /or bonds as to substance and form, the maturities 
thereof to be in accordance with said report and recommendation of the 
General Board adopted at this session ; and that the General Board is 
hereby instructed to allocate and appropriate from the receipts and ex- 
pected receipts on January 1 of each year, during which any of the 
bonds and /or notes herein authorized are outstanding, a sum sufficient to 
pay the interest and principal payments on such refunding notes and /or 
bonds falling due for the then current year ; 

That the Trustees of Meredith College be authorized and instructed 
to secure the notes and /or bonds to the Jefferson Standard Life Insur- 
ance Company or to some other lending agency with a first mortgage or 
deed of trust on the physical property of Meredith College, exclusive of 



See recommendation 6 under General Boards Report. See page 93. 



42 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

endowment, and exclusive of lands acquired in connection with endow- 
ment funds, and exclusive of a portion of the campus property suitable 
for professors' homes, if such portion of the campus property is not 
necessary to be included in order to obtain and secure the loan ; 

That the Convention hereby pledges to the Wachovia Bank & Trust 
Company and to the Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Company, or 
other lending source, that all sums thus allocated and appropriated shall 
constitute and enjoy a first claim upon the incomes and revenues, received 
or to be received, by the convention, excepting only incomes and revenues 
designated for other specific purposes. 

92. The Co-operative Program of Southern Baptists occupied the remainder 
of the afternoon session with General Secretary Huggins presiding and calling 
upon Eugene Olive, Chairman of the Promotion and Enlistment Committee 
for the Committee report and thereafter J. C. Pipes, W. Perry Crouch, M. O. 
Alexander, and Walter L. Johnson brought most encouraging statements from 
our North Carolina Baptist Field of Activity. 

93. Following, J. E. Dilliard, Nashville came speaking upon the subject 
"Why I Believe in the Co-operative Program," and thereafter the Convention 
sang "Break Thou the Bread of Life" and adjourned when J. C. Powell prayed. 



THURSDAY— Evening Session 

The Church In Service Beyond the Seas 

94. This last session opened with the singing of 'We're Marching to Zion" 
and G. T. Mills, Apex, leading the devotions. 

95. A final announcement came at this time from Enrollment Chairman 
W. G. Hall who reported a total registration of 896. 

96. A. D. Kinnett, Chairman, announced with the approval of the Con- 
vention the Laymen's, Promotion Enlistment, and Needy, Aged and Infirm 
Committees. See Page 22, (Section 22). 

Song : "The Great Physician". 

97. At this hour William Harrison Williams, Charlotte, brought the first 
address of the evening and his topic was "Luther Rice". 

Song: "Must I Go an Empty Handed?" 

98. A motion carried authorizing the President, Secretary, and General 
Secretary to approve the Journal. 

99. To Horace Easom, Director of Music and Mrs. W. T. Carpenter, Con- 
vention Pianist, the Convention voted its thanks and also to those people fur- 
nishing flowers during the session. 

100. Prior to the presentation of the Foreign Mission report Forrest 
Feezor suggested and the Convention requested the President and Secretary 
to send this message : 

Durham, N. C. 
November 12, 1936. 
Mrs. J. M. Kester, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

The Baptist State Convention feels keenly the loss of your beloved 
companion, and extends to you and your children deepest sympathy and 
assures you and them of earnest prayers. 

Zeno Wall, President, 
Charles B. Deane, Secretary. 

101. Proceeding, State Representative of the Foreign Mission Board, Forest 
Feezor, Raleigh, requested Missionaries J. C. Powell and Mrs. Powell and 
W. D. Herring, to take brief parts in presenting Foreign Missions to be 



Annual of Session 1936 43 

followed by Board Representative R. S. Jones, Richmond, who made the 
feature address of the evening. 

102. As the closing scene of the One Hundred Sixth Annual Convention 
retiring President Zeno Wall called the incoming President to the Chair and 
President-elect Wm. Louis Poteat commented that this Convention was one 
of the greatest of his lifetime and quietly thereafter Zeno Wall offered the 
closing prayer. 

Zeno Wall, President, 
Charles B. Deane, Secretary. 



PROGRAM 

PRESENTED BY 

NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST PASTORS' 
CONFERENCE 

AT THE 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
Durham, N. C. 

November 9-10, 1936 

Subject: "The High Calling of God" 

MONDAY AFTERNOON 

Rev. and Mrs. Chas. Jollay in charge of Music 

2 :45 — Praise and Prayer 

3 :00 — Devotional Walter L. Johnson, Mount Airy 

3:15— The Divine Call J. C. Powell, Warsaw and Africa 

3 : 45— The Pastor W. F. West, Roxboro 

4:15 — The Preacher John Link, Belcross 

4 :45 — Adjournment 

MONDAY EVENING 

7 :30 — Praise and Prayer 

7 :45 — Devotional David E. Bobbitt, Cherryville 

8 :00 — Roger Williams : Spiritual and Social Pioneer 

O. T. Binkley, Chapel Hill 
8:30 — The Subject of Preaching Jesse W. Weatherspoon, Louisville, Ky. 

9 :00 — Adjournment 

TUESDAY MORNING 

9 :00 — Praise and Prayer 

9 :15 — Devotional Yancey Elliott, Clayton 

9 :30 — Miscellaneous Business 

9 :45 — Report of Committee on Pastoral Relations 
10:00 — The Conditions of a Fruitful Ministry 

Ralph Herring, Winston-Salem 

10:30— The Preacher as Prophet Walt N. Johnson, Mars Hill 

11:00 — The Object of Preaching Jesse W. Weatherspoon, Louisville, Ky. 

11 :45 — Adjournment 

Hexry B. Anderson, President, Durham, 
J. Louis Price, I'icc-Presidoit, Siler City, 
Trela D. Collins, Secretary, Durham. 



[44] 



Annual of Session 1936 



45 



®uv Home <§oerg 


H. L. ARNOLD 
Raleigh 


W. R. JOHNSON 
Wilmington 


L. A. BANGLE 
Lincolnton 


J. B. KELLY 
Wadesboro 


J. T. BEAVER 
Burnsville 


J. MARCUS KESTER 
Wilmington 


S. J. BETTS 
Raleigh 


C. G. LOWE 
Rocky Mount 


M. A. BLEVINS 

Winston-Salem 


W. E. LOWE 
Shelby 


W. J. BUMGARNER 

Taylorsville 


j. c. McGregor 

Rocky Mount 


E. P. BUTLER 

Whiteville 


J. L. MARTIN 

Pineola 


T. A. CAUDLE 
Yadkinville 


H. REID MILLER 
Littleton 


A. L. COFFEY 
Caroleen 


C. MILLIKEN 
Nakina 


B. R. CROWDER 
Winston-Salem 


A. T. PARDUE 
Roaring River 


R. N. DEITZ 
Green's Creek 


A. C. QUEEN 
Webster 


W. E. DUNNAGAN . 
Durham 


J. R. QUISENBERRY 
Wake Forest 


N. M. FELTS 
Union Grove 


W. H. SCOTT 

Selma 


DAVID GREEN 
Bakersville 


A. J. SPRINKLE 

Weaverville \*i 


ISAAC GRINDSTAFF 
Toecane 


W. L. SHERRILL 

Bryson City 


*j R. P. GROGAN 
Canton 


K. L. STANLEY 
Whiteville 


T. J. HOOD 
Goldsboro 


L. A. WILSON 

Boone ■)• 


W. A. HOUGH 

jj New London 





LIST OF MESSENGERS BY ASSOCIATIONS 

REPRESENTATIVES FROM HEADQUARTERS (18)— M. O. Alexander, Ora Alford, 
Mary Ayscue., W. Perry Crouch, Mary Currin, Charles H. Dickey, J. S. Farmer, Mrs. 
Edna R. Harris, M. A. Huggins, Hugh Johnson, Mrs. Roger P. Marshall, Bessie 
Morgan, L. L. Morgan, Margie Murchison, Velma Preslar, Mabel Starnes, R. F. 
Terrell, Mrs. J. E. Tharrington. 

ALLEGHANY (2)— Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Fender, Whitehead. 

ATLANTIC (13)— T. N. Cooper, Richlands; M. Leslie Davis and M. Leslie Davis, Jr., 
Beaufort; J. P. Harris, Maysville; M. L. Mintz, Swansboro; Mrs. Jemima Ringgold, 
Pollocksville; W. B. Sprinkle, Marshallberg; Rev. and Mrs. J. F. Stegall, Pollocks- 
ville; A. P. Stephens, Morehead City; R. A. Thompson, New Bern; R. T. Willis, 
Morehead City; R. T. Willis, Jr., Oriental. 

BEULAH (21)— Mrs. T. M. Allen, Semora; Mrs. Molly Strum Barrett, Roxboro; Mary 
Clay Coley, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Coley, Longhurst; Rev. and Mrs. L. V. Coggins, 
Semora; Miss Lucille Davidson, Roxboro; Mrs. S. O. Garrett, Mrs. Carrie Hollo- 
man, Mrs. Horton. Somora; Rev. and Mrs. F. L. Israel, R. 4. Danville, Va. ; Mrs. 
W. W. Morrell, Longhurst; Mrs. E. Y. McAden, Semora; Rev. and Mrs. K. D. 
Stukenbrok, Roxboro; N. J. Todd, Roxboro; Rev. and Mrs. W. F. West, Roxboro; 
Mrs. R. L. Wilburn, Roxboro. 

BLADEN (3)— Rev. and Mrs. W. O. Biggs, Elizabethtown; R. J. Hall, Bladenboro. 
BLUE RIDGE (4)— M. A. Adams. West Marion; B. F. Brav, Jr., Marion; W. R. 
Grigg, Marion; R. L. Smith, Old Fort. 

BRUNSWICK (1)— R. E. Sentelle, Southport. 

BRUSHY MOUNTAIN (4) -A. M. Church. Wilkesboro; J. F. Jordan, Wilkesboro; Rev. 
and Mrs. Eugene Olive, North Wilkesboro. 

BUNCOMBE (19)— W. R. Burrell. Asheville; William H. Covert. Weaverville; G. C. 
Cox, Asheville; E. Gibson Davis, Asheville; Paul Forsythe, Ridgecrest; B. F. Gehring, 
Biltmore; J. B. Grice, Asheville; Lewis E. Ludlum, Asheville; D. C. Martin, Ashe- 
ville; Mr. and Mrs. Perry Morgan, Ridgecrest; E. V. Plemmons, Candler; J. C. Pipes, 
Asheville; Mrs. W. M. Pate, Ridgecrest; Otto Parham, West Asheville; Rev. and 
Mrs. Nane Starnes, Asheville; Wayne W. Williams, Oteen; Wyman E. Wood, 
Swannanoa. 

BURNT SWAMP (2)— Rev. and Mrs. M. C. Lunsford, Pembroke. 

CABARRUS (8)— Clyde E. Baucom, Concord; C. A. Canup, Concord; Grady J. Haynes, 
Concord; Wade H. James, Kannapolis; C. R. Johnson, West Concord; M. L. Ross, 
Concord; J. A. Seymour, Concord; E. S. Summers, Concord. 

CALDWELL (15)— Rev. and Mrs. W. R. Beach, Lenoir; Rev. and Mrs. J. G. Benneld, 
Granite Falls; R. D. Carroll, Hudson; W. D. Early, Granite Falls; Richard E. Harda- 
way, Lenoir; Wilbert Lynes, Lenoir; Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Palmer, Lenoir; G. G. 
Steele, Lenoir; G. C. Teague, Granite Falls; LeRoy Thomas, Rhodhiss; Mr. and Mrs. 
Will Watson, Lenoir. 

CAROLINA (1)— Broadus E. Wall, Hendersonville. 

CATAWBA RIVER (5)— R. L. Councilman, Morganton; J. R. Greene, Drexel; M. I. 
Harris, Valdese; Rev. and Mrs. O. K. Webb, Morganton. 

CENTRAL (37)— Charles E. Brewer, Raleigh; John T. Biddle, Franklinton; Rev. and 
Mrs. H. O. Baker, Wake Forest; J. G. Blalock, Wake Forest; Mrs. D. B. Bryan, 
Wake Forest; Rev. and Mrs. R. N. Childress, Raleigh; W. R. Cullom, Wake Forest; 
I. M. Deaton, Raleigh; Dr. and Mrs. J. Allen Easley, Wake Forest; W. C. Francis, 
Wake Forest, Mrs. Robert J. Griffin, Raleigh; F. B. Hamrick, Raleigh; Mrs. Wesley 
N. Jones, Raleigh; B. E. Kinton, Youngsville; Thurman D. Kitchin, Wake Forest; 
Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Lawrence, Creedmcor; Jesse. McCarter, Wake Forest; Mrs. J. T. 
Moore, Cary; C. L. Ousley, Wendell; Mrs. M. L. Phillips, Cary; J. O. Purnell, 
Franklinton; W. L. Poteat, Wake Forest; R. E. Royall, Wake Forest; Mrs. W. A. 
Smith, Raleigh; Mrs. Alma Short. Wake Forest; H. R. Starling, Wake Forest; John 
A Sheets, Raleigh; Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh; J. P. Tucker, Raleigh; Mrs. J. G. 
Vann, Raleigh; Mrs. J. W. Whitfield, Creedmoor; William L. Wyatt, Raleigh; A. 
Y. Arledge, Raleigh. 

CHOWAN (10) — Rev. and Mrs. A. A. Butler, Hertford; D. S. Dempsey, Hertford; Ira 
S. Harrell, South Mills; H. B. Hines, Manteo; W. D. Morris, Elizabeth City; A. H. 
Outlaw, Elizabeth City; E. H. Potts, Elizabeth City; T. L. White, Jr., Elizabeth City; 
W. F. Woodall. Gatesville. 

COLUMBUS (8)— C. R. Hinton, Tabor City; S. N. Lamb. Whiteville; I. T. Newton, 
Whiteville; W. G. Russell, Brunswick; W. J. Russell, Whiteville; R. J. Rasberry, 
Hallsboro; G. M. Singletary, Whiteville; M. C. Wilkinson, Whiteville. 

DOCK (1)— A. T. Cain, Bladenboro. 

EASTERN (16)— J. Herman Barnes, Rose Hill; Mrs. Joe R. Best, Clinton; H. G. 
Bryant, Clinton; R. C. Foster, Warsaw; Ethel Hudson, Turkey; Elbert N. Johnson, 
Mt. Olive; T. H. King, Clinton; Rev. and Mrs. R. F. Marshburn, Salemburg; H. 

146 1 



Annual of Session 1936 47 

M. Middleton, Warsaw; Oscar O. Peterson, Clinton; A. Phillips, Warsaw; J. L. 

Powers, Beulaville; Mr. and Mrs. J. Sebron Royal, Clinton; G. T. Wallace, Clinton. 
FLAT RIVER (21) — Mrs. Ben H. Averett, Mrs. L. D. Blackwell, M. L. Bannister, Mrs. 

J. M. Blalock, Mrs. Sterling Carrington. Oxford; Joe B. Currin, Roxboro; Rev. and 

Mrs. Edwin R. Harris, Virgilina, Va.; F. D. Hancock, Mrs. A. T. Knott, Mrs. Len 

Knott, Charles O. Mainor, Mrs. T. O. Mullins, Oxford; J. H. Perry, Creedmoor; 

Rev. and Mrs. W. D. Poe, Oxford; G. Van Stephens, Mittie Lee Taylor, Oxford; 

J. U. Teague, Henderson; Rev. and Mrs. E. G. Usry, Oxford. 
FRENCH BROAD (6)— Hoyt Blackwell, Walt N. Johnson, Rev. and Mrs. W. L. 

Lynch, Dr. and Mrs. R. L. Moore, Mars Hill. 
GASTON (14)— B. F. Austin, Gastonia; M. L. Barnes, Mt. Holly; Dr. and Mrs. B. A. 

Bowers, Gastonia; David E. Bobbitt, Cherry ville; G. W. Davis, Gastonia; P. A. Hicks, 

Belmont; W. Arthur Hoffman, Gastonia; E. V. Hudson, Cramerton; A. C. Lovelace, 

Gastonia; Mxs. J. D. Moore, Gastonia; Maude Lee Keys, Belmont; Mrs. S. M. 

Stroupe, Alexis; D. C. Wesson, Mc Aden ville. 
GREEN RIVER (3)— Edward B. Jenkins, Rutherfordton; Rev. and Mrs. Charles B. 

Trammel, Columbus. 

HAYWOOD (8)— H. W. Baucom, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Burgin, Mr. and Mrs. W. G. 
Byers, Waynesville; A. V. Joyner, Canton; Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Morgan, Waynesville. 

JOHNSTON (16)— G. A. Bain, Dunn; F. H. Brooks, Smithfield; J. E. Carter, Selma; 
D. M. Cle.mmons, Selma; Theo. B. Davis, Zebulon ; Yancey C. Elliott, Clayton; Rev. 
and Mrs. C. L. Gillespie, Smithfield; Mjr. and Mrs. Geo. E. Lovell, Clayton; W. O. 
Rosser, Smithfield; Rev. and Mrs. C. W. Teague, Selma; Mrs. L. A. Westbrook, 
Smithfield; Rev. and Mrs. Forrest L. Young, Benson. 

KINGS MOUNTAIN (14)— Rev. and Mrs. Wade D. Bostick, Shelby; George J. Burnett, 
Boiling Springs; Horace Eason, Rev. and Mrs. W. A. Elam, Rev. and Mrs. R. P. 
Hamby, Shelby; J. L. Jenkins, Boiling Springs; B. P. Parks, Shelby; Mrs. M. A. 
Spangler, Mrs. Rush Stroup, Zeno Wall, D. G. Washburn, Shelby. 

LIBERTY (28)— L. A. Bruton, R. D. Covington, Hattie Edwards, Thomasville; Louis 
S. Gaines, Lexington; Mrs. R. S. Green, Mr. and Mrs. I. G. Greer, Mrs. R. G. 
Jennings, Sallie L. McCracken, Mary Ellen McCredie, W. K. McGee, C. C. McKoin, 
John Arch McMillan, Thomasville; L. J. Matthews, Wallburg; G. W. Miller, Lexing- 
ton; E. F. Mumford, High Point; Rev. and Mrs. J. A. Neilson Thomasville; H. T. 
Penry, Southmcnt; Rev. and Mrs. E. C. Roach, Erlanger; Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Sharpe, 
Lexington; Miss Roxie Sheets, Lexington; L. E. Teague, Mrs. T. H. Tomlinson, 
Thomasville; C. M. Wall, Walter L. Warfford, Lexington. 

LITTLE RIVER (9)— Leslie H. Campbell, L. E. Dailey, Buie's Creek; E. Norfleet 
Gardner, Dunn; R. F. Hall, Lillington; Charles B. Howard, Buie's Creek; Lizzie 
Jones, Fuquay Springs; John W. Lambert, Broadway; W. M. Thomas, Broadway; 
George R. Wells, Varina. 

MECKLENBURG (17)— R. H. Black, North Charlotte; Sam K. Brazil, Charlotte; 
George W. Burch, Paw Creek: Zeb Caudle, C. W. Durden, Mrs. O. L. Faber, W. L. 
Griggs, Charlotte; George L. Hocutt, Matthews; W. Walter Jones, Robert L. Lemons, 
Luther Little, Raymond Long, J. D. Moose, Charlotte; W. W. Rimmer, Cornelius; 
Edward E. Rutledge, Dr. and Mrs. Win. Harrison Williams, Charlotte. 

MONTGOMERY (1)— W. M. Williamson, Biscoe. 

MOUNT ZION (69— J. F. Adams, H. B. Anderson, Durham; Mrs. R. Homer Andrews, 
Burlington; S. W. Andrews, Chapel Hill; C. E. Baker, Durham; Dr. and Mrs. 
Olin T. Binklev, Chapel Hill; L. B. Bonev, Durham; Mrs. B. P. Bowling. Rouge- 
mont; H. S. Boyce, Leo Bridgers, C E. Bvrd, W. E. Byrd, Durham; C. A. Caldwell, 
Hillsboro; Mrs. O. S. Chandler, Burlington; A. K. Cheek, L. G. Cole, Trela D. 
Collins, Durham; R. P. Ellington, Graham; R. S. Ellis, Durham; R. A. Eubanks, 
Bob Eubanks, Chapel Hill; Thurston Evans, Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Ferguson, Mrs. D. 
R. Garrett, W. G. Hall, Durham; Rev. and Mrs. A. C. Hamby, Mebane; P. P. Hart- 
sell, Durham; George N. Harward, Chapel Hill; C. L. Hagwood, Durham; J. B. 
Hocutt, John Hocutt, Chapel Hill; Charles F. Hudson, Durham; W. Wilbur Hutchins, 
Apex; Charles Jollay, Durham; Rev. and Mrs. W. O. Kersey, Rev. and Mrs. A. D. 
Kinnett, Burlington; R. G. Kendrick, Dr. and Mrs. Ira D. S. Knight, Durham; 
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Lee, Mebane; L. C. Lee, R. S. Lindsey, Durham; Miss Lena 
Melton, Burlington; James P. Morgan. B. E. Morris, Durham; Roy A. Morris, Carr- 
boro; Mrs. J. C. Myrick, Durham: Luther A. Nail, Burlington; Hugh L. Nichols, Rev. 
and Mrs. C. S. Norville, Durham; W. P. Phillips. Jr., West Durham; L. J. Rainey, 
Durham; J. C. Revels, Graham; J. T. Riddick, George H. Ross, Durham; Mrs. T. L. 
Sellars. Burlington; W. E. Stanlev, Durham; G. W. Swinnev, Burlington; Z. B. 
Teel, East Durham; George T. Watkins, Tr., W. O. Williams, Durham; W. M. 
Wilson, Chapel Hill. 

NEUSE (13) — B. G. Early, Kinston ; Sam A. Hines, Seven Springs; J. C. Hough, T. C. 
Johnson, Kinston; Ethel Lyles. Goldsboro; Mrs. B. Martin, Kinston; G. A. Norwood, 
Goldsboro; Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Powers, Kinston; Rev. and Mrs. A. J. Smith, Golds- 
boro; B. W. Spilman, Martha Watson, Kinston. 

NEW SOUTH RIVER (11)— G. N. Ashley, Salemburg; A. L. Brown, Benson; Otis 
Hobbs, Roseboro; Joel S. Johnson, Fayetteville; Troy Jones, Stedman; W. J. Jones, 
Salemburg; John A. Oates, Mrs W. H Powell, Joel S. Snyder, Fayetteville; John 
L. Williams, Julia C. Williams, Dunn. 



48 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

PAMLICO (4)— Carl E. Gaddy, Columbia; J. Jeter Johnson, Belhaven; G. A. Martin, 
Creswell ; E. R. Stewart, Fairfield. 

PEE DEE (21)— Mrs. W. C. Barrett, Laurinburg; Bruce Benton, A. R. Brothers, C. B. 
Deane, Mr. and Mrs. Claude Gore, Mrs. Betty Seawell, Rockingham; J. I. MGill, 
Lilesville; Miss Jewell Mcintosh, Rockingham; Rev. and Mrs. O. W. McManus, 
Gibson; Ethel Meacham, Rockingham; W. H. Moore, Wadesboro; Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Pearce, Hamlet; C. E. Ruffm, Ellerbe; Miss Geneva Seago, C. O. Funderburk, 
Rockingham; Charles E. Stevens, Morven; Aubrey S. Tomlinson, Laurinburg; J. 
B. Willis, Hamlet. 

PIEDMONT (40)— Thomas E. Baber, J. T. J. Battle, Greensboro; James N. Bowman, 
High Point; Tom W. Bray, Pleasant Garden; Mrs. W. O. Burnham, Greensboro; A. B. 
Conrad, High Point; A. Wayland Cooke, J. Ben Eller, Greensboro; A. Lincoln Fulk, 
High Point; John U. Garner, Greensboro; James C. Gillespie, Reidsville; W. J. 
Goldsmith, J. M. Hilliard, High Point; Mrs. Nettie Hoge, Greensboro; G. H. Jones, 
High Point; J. E. Kirk, Mrs. Eugene McLarty, Greensboro; Hughey O. Miller, High 
Point; Mrs. F. S. Miles, Cleo Mitchell, J. S. Moore, Mrs. C. W. Moseley, Greensboro; 
D. W. Overby, Reidsville; Frank L. Pschal, Greensboro; Edna Phillips, Rev. and 
Mrs. Grover C. Phillips, Altamahaw; Mrs. R. E. Ebey, Greensboro; C. N. Royal, High 
Point; Rev. and Mrs. T. L. Sasser;, Tom Sasser, Reidsville; Mrs. Ben Spencer, 
Greensboro; A. E. Tate, High Point; Mrs. Charles Tucker, Dr. and Mrs. J. Clyde 
Turner, A. A. Walker, B. G. Whitley, Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro. 

PILOT MOUNTAIN (35)— R. E. Adams, Mayodan; J. C. Ammons, Leaksville; Exum 

F. Baker, Kernersville; Mabel Beeker, Leaksville; J. F. Carter, Winston-Salem; Paul 
P. Davis, Yadkinville; Mrs. A. W. Dunn, Leaksville; Robert A. Gardner, Madison; 
Mr. and Mrs. Smith Hagaman, V. H. Harrell, Winston-Salem; E. X. Heatherley, 
Leaksville; Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem; Rev. and Mrs. D. H. Ives, Leaks- 
ville; Raymond Lanier, Mount Airy; Cora Lee, Mrs. G. T. Lumpkin, Winston-Salem; 
T. C. McCuiston, Kernersville; B. K. Mason, S. F. Morton, W. T. Myers, S. L. 
Naff, Sue Noell, Charles E. Parker, Rev. and Mrs. Charles H. Stevens, C. V. 
Strickland, J. Ned Taylor, N. C. Teague, Winston-Salem; N. A. Thompson, Jr., 
Draper; Mrs. S. A. Tredway, Leaksville; J. C. Watkins, Rev. and Mrs. D. H. 
Wilcox. 

RALEIGH (30)— Rev. and Mrs. W. O. Andrews, Raleigh; C. M. Beach, Cary; E. B. 
Booker, Apex; Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Broughton, Raleigh; Ford A. Burns, Fuquay 
Springs; C. H. Cashwell, Wendell; G. N. Cowan, Apex; Mr. and Mrs. Willard L. 
Dowell, Raleigh; Lucius R. Evans, Knightdale; Forrest C. Feezor, L. E. M. Free- 
man, Raleigh; R. H. Herring, Zebulon; T. S. Lawrence, Cary; Mr. and Mrs. G. E. 
Lineberry, W. P. McGehee, Raleigh; G. T. Mills, Apex; J. Andrew Morgan, Cary; 
Leslie Newman, Wendell; C. H. Norris, Wake Forest; S. W. Oldham, Cary; Edwin 
McNeill Poteat, Jr., Raleigh; O. L. Riggs, Durham; C. C. Seagraves, Fuquay Springs; 
R. N. Simms, Sr., R. N. Simms, Jr., Raleigh; Marva Leigh Stephens, Holly Springs. 

RANDOLPH (8)— O. P. Dix, Randleman; J. C. Edwards, Staley; R. E. Heath, Steeds; 
Hoyle Love, High Point; Rev. and Mrs. L. R. O'Brian, Mrs. C. W. Scott, Asheboro; 
H. M. Stroup, Ramseur. 

ROANOKE (39) — Mrs. Frank Armstrong, Nashville; Emily S. Austin, Tarboro; William 

B. Batts. Rocky Mount; Mrs. Z. T. Brewer, Roanoke Rapids; John T. Coley, 
Rockv Mount; Mrs. P. A. Cook, Roanoke Rapids; R. L. Evans. Farmville; 
Dr. and Mrs. Hugh A. Ellis, Wilson; J. R. Everett, Washington; Mrs. W. D. 
Farmer, Rocky Mount; A. W. Fleischmann, Greenville; Mrs. J. L. Fleming, Green- 
ville; Richard S. Fountain, Weldon; Mrs. C. B. Foy, Rev. and Mrs. J. F. Gaddy, 
Rockv Mount; W. E. Goode, Scotland Neck; J. E. Hoyle, Whitakers; Dr. and Mrs. 
T. W. Kincheloe, Mrs. H. Z. Luper, Rev. and Mrs. O. N. Marshall, Rocky Mount; 

G. W. Mav, Red Oak; Mrs. W. F. Metcalfe, Rocky Mount; J. L. Peacock, Mrs. 
Nina B. Powell, Tarboro; Mrs. R. S. Powell, Rocky Mount; Mrs. J. G. Raby, 
Tarboro; E. C. Shoe, Robersonville; J. H. Smith, Williamston; Mrs. J. B. Spil- 
man, Greenville; Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Tripp, Sharpsburg; Emma Ruth Weeks, Tar- 
boro; E. G. Willis, Nashville; Rev. and Mrs. J. L. Willis, Roanoke Rapids. 

ROBESON (12)— W. T. Baucom, St. Pauls; I. P. Hedgepeth. Lumberton; C. P. 
Herring, Fairmont; C. R. Hester, W. H. Howard, St. Pauls; Sam F. Hudson, Red 
Springs; W. O. Johnson, St. Pauls; John R. Miller, Raeford; E. A. Paul, T. P. 
Powers; Rev. and Mrs. C. S. Smith, Lumberton; Rev. and Mrs. C. V. Brooks, Rowland. 

ROWAN (6)— Earle L. Bradley, Spencer; Arch C. Cree, Rev. and Mrs. E. F. Eagle, 

C. A. Rhyne, Salisbury; Miss Louise Smith, Granite Quarry. 

SANDY CREEK (19)— E. W. Bverly, Bonlee; Mrs. T. J. Brooks, Sanford; V. M. Dor- 
sett, Siler City; Mrs. E. L. Gavin, Sanford; B. L. Gupton, Pittsboro; E. M. Harris, 
Aberdeen; Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Harward, Moncure; W. T. Hurst, Victor R. Johnson, 
Pittsboro; A. H. Jones, Siler City; O. A. Keller, Jonesboro; A. H. Porter, Bonlee; 
J. Louis Price, Siler City; Charles P. Rogers. Dr. and Mrs. Ronald E. Wall, Sanford; 
Rev. and Mrs. R. H. Weaver, Bonlee. 

SANDY RUN (6)— T. A. Brock. T. M. Hester, Spindale; J. A. Hunnicutt, Cliffside; 
Charles T. Plybon, Forest City; Dean Smith, Chesnee, S. C; Charles B. Vause, 
Spindale. 

SOUTH FORK (15)— Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Bandy, W. P. Biggerstaff, Lincolnton; W. R. 
Bradshaw, Hickory; J. R. Cantrell, Newton; Elbert F. Hardin, Lincolnton; L. L. 



Annual of Session 1936 49 

Hatfield, C. H. Henderson, Hickory; W. C. Laney, Brookford; Rev. and Mrs. 

Richard K. Redwine, Hickory; S. A. Stroup, Catawba; E. F. Sullivan, Fred Womack, 

Hickory; Ruth Young, Vale. 
SOUTH MOUNTAIN (1)— James R. Huffman, Connelly Springs. 
SOUTH YADKIN (10) — Clifton T. Allen, Statesville; Walter H. Dodd, Mocksville; Frank 

Carter Hawkins, Rev. and Mrs. H. Fletcher Lambert, A. C. McCall, Statesville; C. H. 

Myers, Mooresville; Mrs. R. L. Poovey, Statesville; Rev. and Mrs. A. T. Stoudenmire, 

Cooleemee. 
STANLY (9)— Rev. and Mrs. F. A. Bower. W. S. Caudle, M. L. Dorton, T. W. Fore- 
man, W. B. Holmes, Albemarle; J. D. Marler, Crawford W. Poplin, New London; Z. 

W. Rotan, Albemarle. 
SURRY (4)— J. S. Bray, Walter L. Johnson, A. V. West. Mount Airy; Eph Whisenhunt. 

Elkin. 
TAR RIVER (14) — Mrs. J. T. Alderman, Henderson; J. Edward Allen. Warrenton ; 

Ernest Y. Averett, Spring Hope; R. E. Brickhouse, Warrenton; Mrs. W. B. Daniel. 

Sr., Henderson; John Edwards, Louisburg; A. S. Hale. Henderson; John H. Harper, 

Louisburg; E. R. Nelson, Henderson; A. A. Pippin, Zebulon; Joseph W. Riggan, 

Macon; Joe F. Roach, Norlina; Mrs. W. C. Stainback, Henderson; F. G. Walker, 

Castalia. 
TENNESSEE RIVER (2)— Vance A. Browning. Brvson City; W. F. Sinclair, Robbins- 

ville. 
THREE FORKS (2)— J. C. Canipe, Bcone; J. A. McKaughan, Winston-Salem. 
TUCKASEIGEE (3)— Rev. and Mrs. H. M. Hocutt, Sylva; H. T. Hunter, Cullowhee. 
UNION (9) — C. C. Burris, Wingate; Harrv Gamble, Waxhaw; H. F. Goodwin. Monroe; 

James B. Little, Marsh ville; Mr. and Mrs. Ernest M. Smith. J. A. Snow, Wingate; 

E. C. Snyder, Monroe; John T. Wayland, Monroe. 

WEST CHOWAN (16)— Rev. and Mrs. H. F. Brinson. Lewiston; John H. Bunn, 
Murfreesboro; Oscar Creech. Ahoskie; L. M. Dixon, Colerain; Mrs. Herbert Jenkins, 
Aulander; John R. Link, Windsor; Roy R. McCulloch, Murfreesboro; C. B. Morris, 
Colerain; Mrs. D. L. Myers. Ahoskie; Mrs. J. D. Parker, Aulander; C. M. Pegram, 
Pendleton; D. J. Robinson, Winton; Lonnie Sasser, Aulander; W. V. Tarlton. Rich 
Square; C. H. Trueb'.ood, Seaboard. 

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA (2)— J. L. Underwood. Mary Underwood. Hayesville. 

WILMINGTON (12)— Arthur J. Barton, Rev. and Mrs. Sankey L. Blanton, H. P. 
Briggs, Wilmington; Flora Cavenaugh. Wallace; Eleanor M. Grant, Wilmington; L. 
L. Johnson, Magnolia; J. L. Jones, Wilmington; Rev. and Mrs. John E. Lanier, 
Wallace; R. H. Satterfield, H. S. Strickland, Wilmington. 

YADKIN (2)— J. P. Davis, F. M. Woodhouse, Boonville. 

YANCEY (1)— R. E. Powell, Burnsville. 

VISITORS (133)— Mrs. J. M. Arnette, Raleigh; Currie F. Arnold, Tarboro; Mrs. J. M. 
Barbee. Mrs. D. C. Barbee, Durham; Myrtle Barnette, Winston-Salem; Mrs. D. W. 
Batchelor, Sharpsburg; Mrs. Fred Battle, Raleigh; Mrs. R. E. Batton, Smithfield; 
Noble Y. Beale, Atlanta, Ga. ; Frank W. Bennett, Durham; T. H. Biles, Charlotte; 
Mrs. Z. C. Bissette, Wilmington; Mrs. J. C. Blanks, Pembroke; Mrs. Henrv Bowling, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Broadwell, Durham; El Dora Bryant, Mrs. Paul J. Bryant, Clin- 
ton; Ruby Byerly, Thomasville; Mrs. A. J. Byrd, Henderson; H. U. Byrd. Durham; 
Mrs. L. E. Candler, Henderson; Mrs. W. T. Carpenter, Durham; Mrs. C. P. Cates, 
Mrs. S. H. Cates, Mebane; Mrs. Nannie B. Cheek, Durham; Mrs. Whitfield Cobb, 
Winston-Salem; Mrs. P. B. Comer, Greensboro; Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Covington, Jr., 
Winston-Salem; F. T. Cox, Columbia, S. C. ; Mrs. W. Perry Crouch, Raleigh; Mrs. 
John Daughtery, Goldsboro; Mrs. Charlie Davis, Durham; Mrs. Jasper M. Dean, 
Winston-Salem; Mrs. Charles H. Dickey. Raleigh; Mr. and Mrs. I. H. Dunlap, 
Bonlee; Mrs. J. A. Eason, Selma; Nina Everett, Smithfield; J. O. Fulbright, Clarks- 
ville, La.; Helen Gibson, Nashville, Tenn.; Mrs. Benj. Giveans. Warwick, N. Y. ; 
Mrs. Felix W. Graves, Mebane; Luther B. Grice, DeLand, Fla. ; George W. Griffin, 
Washington, D. C. ; Elma Harward, Thomasville; B. Frank Hasty. Greenville, S. C. ; 
Oscar Hay ward, Mt. Gilead; J. T. Henderson, Knoxville, Tenn.; Mrs. D. D. Hocutt, 
Henderson; Thomas C. Holland, Mooresboro; Maude Holler, Sanford; Mrs. M. A. 
Huggins, J. Rufus Hunter, Raleigh; Mrs. F. A. Hyatt, Goldsboro; Dwight Ives, Jr., 
Leaksville; Mary Belle Jarrell, Thomasville; T. Neil Johnson, Waynesville; Horace E. 
Jones, Buie's Creek; Mrs. Lehman Jones, Smithfield; Ernest C. Kolb, Cheraw. S. C. ; 
Mrs. W. T. Lee, Oxford; Mrs. C. A." M.cKeei, Greensboro; Mrs. A. E. Martin, Clayton; 
Ross G. Martin, Raleigh; Mrs. Maye. T. Matthews, Winston-Salem; Mrs. Sarah 
Maynard, Mrs. Rosa C. Maynard, Mrs. A. H. Maynard, Durham; Rev. and Mrs. J. 
Gray Murray, Cary; Annie M. Myatt, Smithfield; Mrs. R. E. Myrick, Henderson; Mrs. 
W. H. Nelson, Clinton; W. E. Oglesby, Thomasville; Mrs. John H. Orr, Rocky 
Mount; Clarence J. Owen, Washington. D. C. ; G. G. Page, Buie's Creek; Rev. and 
Mrs. J. M. Page, Raleigh; Mrs. W. L. Parks, Winston-Salem; Grady S. Patterson, 
Wake Forest; Mrs. E. A. Pearson, Clinton; Mrs. A. C. Perry, Winston-Salem; C. C. 
Perry, Louisville, Ky.j M. G. Perrv, Charlotte; G. A. Phillips, N. A. Phillips, War- 
saw; Mrs. W. B. Pittard, Oxford; Alfred L. Pollock, Chester, Pa.; Rev. and Mrs. 
W. Gordon Poole, Cavendish, Vermont; Carl H. Ragland, Oxford; Mrs. W. P. 
Reed, Fayetteville; C. H. Robertson, Leaksville; Zon Robinson, Mrs. C. N. Rogers, 
Wake Forest; Mrs. M. A. Shaver, Goldsboro; Mrs. Elliott G. Shaw, Henderson; 



50 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Charles C. Smith, Durham; John J. Snow, Wingate; Mrs. J. H. Spaulding, Durham; 
R. F. Staples, Asheville; Edith Steele, Lenoir; Mrs. Beulah Stephens, Raleigh; Clyde 
P. Stinson, Goldston; Mrs. David L. Strain, Durham; Mrs. Neva Taylor, Rocky 
Mount; Mrs. Paul Taylor, Kinston; Mrs. W. L. Taylor, Semora; Mildred Thomas, 
Durham; Mrs. R. W. Thomas, Henderson; Mrs. W. C. Timberlake, Charles H. 
Utley, Durham; Mrs. J. A. Wales, Brookhaven, Miss.; Mrs. Griffin G. Wall, Winston- 
Salem; Demming Ward, D. E. Ward, Jr., Mrs. D. E. Ward, Durham; Charles H. 
Warren, Raleigh; Mrs. A. V. Washburn, Goldsboro; Mrs. R. C. Watkins, Oxford; 
Delia Mae Watson, Thomasville; E. B. Weatherspoon, Durham; Mrs. W. H. Wells, 
Oxford; Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Whaler, Durham; Lily Mae Wilkerson, Buie's Creek; 
Mrs. W. V. Williams, Winston-Salem; Mrs. T. C. Williams, Burlington; Mrs. P. 
H. Winter, Scranton, Pa.; Mrs. Beulah S. Worley, Smithfield; Mrs. George C. Yar- 
borough, Winston-Salem. 



REPORT OF 
THE GENERAL BOARD 



Compiled by 

M. A. Huggins, General Secretary 

Raleigh, N. C. 



51] 



REPORT OF THE GENERAL BOARD 
103. INTRODUCTION 

In making this report, which is the fifth report of the Board prepared by the 
present General Secretary, we express our deep thanksgiving to God for His 
unfailing blessings upon us. Our faith in Him grows continuously, and our 
confidence in the Baptist people has never been greater. 

We rejoice to be able to record in this report some of the achievements 
of the year. We believe that these achievements have been more substantial 
than in any recent year. Gracious revivals have been held in hundreds of 
our churches, and many members have been added. The progress in Sunday 
school \vork, as revealed in this report, has never been more marked, while 
the work of all other departments, B. T. U., B. S. U., work among our men, 
etc., has produced gratifying results. Our institutions are crowded with 
students. Moreover, we have been reducing our obligations to our creditors ; 
at the same time we have been meeting our obligations, in part at least, to the 
people of the state, the southland, and the world. It appears now that we shall 
reduce our obligations to our creditors around $50,000 during the current year, 
and at the same time increase our gifts to all mission and benevolent causes. 

It* appears that our income will be some eight to ten per cent in advance of 
the income of 1935. While this advance is not as great as we had hoped, it 
will be remembered that during the early months of the year we had an un- 
usually severe winter. The result was that for the first three and a half 
months of the.] year we made no gain over 1935. We undertook an enlarged 
budget for this year ; and that is what should have been done. Present indica- 
tions are, however, that we shall come to the end of the year without a deficit 
anywhere along the line. 

We rejoice to record the passing of the financial depression. We know that 
God has wonderfully smiled upon North Carolina. As a token of gratitude and 
as an expression of our abiding interest in the great causes we cherish and 
foster, we ought to, and must, make a great advance during the year that is 
ahead. We speak here not only of a financial advance but also a spiritual ad- 
vance. Are we out of the financial depression? The answer is, yes. A more 
important question is : Are we coming out of the spiritual and moral depression 
into which we slumped prior 1 to the financial depression in 1929 and 1930? No 
more important question faces our churches and Convention now than this. 

While we point with pardonable pride to substantial achievements all along 
the line, we know that our gains are small in comparison with what we ought 
to be doing. We must go forward with a great program of evangelism here 
in the state, in the south and in the world. We must win men and women who 
are outside of our churches and who are lost to God. An equally important 
task is winning the men and women in our churches who are now lost, appar- 
ently completely lost, to His Kingdom. When we think of the great tasks ahead 
of us there is no place for pride, but rather of humility and a deep resolve to 
seriously undertake the challenging tasks that await us. Evangelism and 
stewardship must go hand in hand in our thinking, in our planning, and in our 
activities. 
[52] 



Annual of Session 1936 53 

In 1933 the Convention adopted twenty-two objectives. We can measure, at 
least in part, our progress in terms of these objectives. This procedure will 
enable us to get a fairly accurate glimpse of many phases of our work, as 
well as the progress which we are making. 

104. I. OUR OBJECTIVES 

In parentheses we give the figures for last year and for the years preceding, 
in so far as this is possible. The figures in the first parentheses are for the year 
immediately preceding ; and in the second parentheses the figures for the 
next preceding year, etc., are given. 

1. Every church with a pastor. 

It is estimated that on October 1, 1936, 150 (160) (175) (200), 
churches were without pastors. Probably there are at all times at least 
150 pastorless churches. 

2. A revival in each church — at least one each year. 

Accurate figures are not available, but the Minutes of 1935 show that 
1,783 (1,797) (1,792), churches reported baptisms, while 653 (613) (593) 
did not. Taking the state as a whole, 18,768 baptisms were reported in 
1935, 19,670 in 1934, 20,038 in 1933 and 23,342 in 1932. The 653 churches 
reporting no baptisms have a combined membership of 76,210. It is in- 
teresting also to note that these 76,210 members gave to denominational 
causes $49,522, or a per capita of 67 cents a year. In other words, the per 
capita gifts of the churches reporting no baptisms is only about one half 
of that for the state as a whole. 

3. Every church with a Sunday school enrollment at least as large as the 
church membership. 

For the year 1935 854 (863) (810) (912) of the 2,430 Sunday schools 
in the state met this requirement. 

4. Every church with a B. T. TJ. 

As of October 1, 1936, 950 (1,050) (1,043) (975) of the 2,436 churches 
had a B. T. U. organization. (This would indicate that we had fewer 
B. T. U. organizations than last year, but the drop in number brought about 
by revision of the mailing list, and all organizations not heard from over a 
given period are being dropped from the list.) 

5. Every church with a W. M. S. 

As of October 1, 1936, 1,156 (1,153) (1,100) (1.118) of the 2,436 
churches had a W. M. S. 

6. At least 500,000 members by 1940, with all church rolls corrected. 

The Minutes of 1935 show a membership of 458,517 (450,770) (440,- 
602) (433,046). The net gain in membership is not quite one half of the 
total baptisms. It is known that many churches, more than formerly 
perhaps, are correcting their rolls. 



54 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

7. Every Association with a representative Promotion-Executive Committee, or 
its equivalent, that functions throughout the year, led by the Moderator 
or the Chairman of the Promotion-Executive Committee, who will visit and 
encourage the churches. 

Probably about 45 (40) (33) of the 70 associations are reefing this 
requirement in whole or in part. Only a few moderators, however, visit 
the churches. 

8. A ten days school, or schools, for Christian workers held each year with an 
attendance of at least 1,000. 

In the three pastors' schools provided at Meredith, Chowan and Mars 
Hill about 250 (225) (192) pastors were enrolled. 

9. At least 2,500 college students enrolled in our Baptist colleges. 

For the year ending June, 1936, there were enrolled 2.419 (2,415) 
(2,229) college students. This does not include 1,029 (691) (651) which 
were enrolled in the Wake Forest-Meredith summer school at Wake For- 
est and Mars Hill. 

10. Two general state missionaries giving their full time 1 , to the development 
of our churches, missionary instruction, forming fields, et cetera, especially 
in the rural churches. 

The Board now has three general missionaries, M. O. Alexander, 
J. C. Pipes, and Charles H. Dickey. 

11. A club of Charity and Children in every Baptist Sunday school. 

For the calendar year 1935 733 (772) (678) (781) Sunday schools had 
a club of Charity and Children. 

12. Twenty-five thousand subscribers to the Biblical Recorder, including every 
pastor, every Sunday school superintendent, every W. M. S. president or 
leader, and every B. T. U. leader or director. 

As of the last week of October, 1936, the circulation of the Biblical Re- 
corder was 13,200 (10,500) (10,400) (8,000). Of the 1,182 ordained 
ministers who were pastors 625 (605) (727) (582), were taking the Re- 
corder; 105 (97) (97) (78), of the 525 ordained ministers not in the 
pastorate were taking it; 440 (410) (396) (317) of the 2.430 Sunday 
school superintendents, and 425 (393) (377) (302) of the 1.156 W. M. S. 
presidents were taking it. 

13. Every institution and agency of the Convention living within its income. 

Chowan, Meredith and Wake Forest had small deficits. They are so 
small, however, it may be said that all institutions are living within their 
incomes. 

14. No borrowing by the Convention, or its institutions or agencies, of any 
funds for any purpose, except in anticipation of current income. 

No funds for current support have been borrowed this year. 

15. A fifty-fifty division of distributable or undesignated funds as between 
State and Southwide objects. 

For 1936 the Cooperative Program (Undesignated), receipts are divided 
on the 60-40 basis, 60 for State and 40 for Southwide objects. 



Annual of Session 1936 55 

16. An annual income, designated and undesignated of $450,000 for the fiscal 
year 1934: $500,000 for 1935; $550,000 for 1936; $600,000 for 1937; 
$660,000 for 1938; $725,000 for 1939 and $800,000 for 1940. 

Our total income for 1935, designated and undesignated, was $493,- 
785. 51-ji. Thus we fell short of our goal by only about $6,000. With real 
effort we can reach our goal of $550,000 for 1936. 

17. Every church contributing through the Cooperative Program, including 
both designated and undesignated funds. 

For 1935 1,877, (1,796), (1,648), (1,607) of the 2,436 churches re- 
ported funds given through the Cooperative Program or to some object 
in the Cooperative Program, leaving 559 (614), (737), (767) that made 
no contribution. 

18. Every church and Sunday school contributing to the Orphanage. 

For 1935 1,944 (1,920), (1,728), (1,686) churches made some con- 
tribution to the Orphanage, leaving 492, (490), (657), (688) that did not. 

19. Every Sunday school contributing and remitting to the Orphanage once 
each month. 

During 1935 218 (269), (230), Sunday schools met this requirement, 
leaving 2,212, (2,115), (2,155) that did not. 

20. Every church making a Thanksgiving offering for the Orphanage. 

1,752, (1,659), (1,515), (1,056) churches or Sunday schools made a 
Thanksgiving offering in 1935 to the Orphanage, leaving 684, (751), 
(870), (1,348) that did not. 

21. Every church and Sunday school making an offering on Mother's Day for 
the Hospital. 

On Mother's Day 1936 about 1,508, (1,706), (1,308), (1,062) churches 
or Sunday schools made an offering to the Hospital. 

22. Every church making a remittance to the Convention Treasurer at least 
once a month. 

For the year 1935 328, (359), (215), (197) churches met this require- 
ment. 

105. II. REPORT OF GENERAL BOARD MEETINGS 

The Board has had two meetings during the year, one on December 16, 
1935, and one on June 11, 1936. In accord with the Constitution of the Conven- 
tion the important actions of the Board during the year are here recorded. 

1. The principal item which claimed the attention of the Board in its 
December meeting was the adoption of the budget for 1936. We do not pub- 
lish here the budget figures for the reason that actual expenditures for each 
department of the work will be published in the Convention Annual. Suffice 
it to say the budget was carefully and' conservatively made and we are living 
without our income. 

2. The last Convention ordered that all undesignated funds be divided 
sixty per cent for State objects and forty per cent for Southwide objects. 



56 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

The Board divided the sixty per cent for State objects as follows: Chris- 
tian Education, Debt Service 42 per cent; State Missions 13 per cent; Hos- 
pital 4 per cent ; Ministerial Education 1 per cent. 

3. A resolution was passed authorizing the borrowing of sufficient funds 
to retire the mortgage on the property of Boiling Springs College, the amount 
of the mortgage being $16,000. (Subsequently $16,000 was borrowed from 
the Wachovia Bank & Trust Company at an interest rate of 5 per cent, same 
to be paid during 1936, 1937 and 1938.) 

4. A resolution was adopted authorizing the restoration of salaries of the 
administrative and departmental staff to the 1932 level "as funds are avail- 
able and under the direction of the Executive Committee." (Due to severe 
weather during the first part of the year, which in turn affected seriously 
the receipts of the Convention, the salaries have not as yet been restored in 
accordance with the resolution. It is, of course, the definite policy of the 
Board to live within its income.) 

5. The Board accepted with regret the resignation of Perry Morgan as 
Sunday School Secretary, and appointed a committee to draw up suitable 
resolutions in recognition of his work. 

6. The matter of the selection of a Sunday School Secretary to succeed 
Perry Morgan was left open, a special committee being appointed to report 
at a later date. 

At the June 1936 meeting of the Board the following matters were de- 
termined upon. 

1. The Board heard the request of Wake Forest College for an appro- 
priation of $9,000 for current support ; also a similar request from Chowan 
College made through President Roy R. McCulloch. These requests were 
referred to the Education Committee of the General Board for study. 

2. Upon motion the following recommendation from the Executive Commit- 
tee was adopted : 

The Executive Committee of the General Board of the Baptist State Con- 
vention recommends the appointment of a Secretary of Christian Education, 
under whose supervision shall be promoted the activities of the Sunday 
School, Baptist Training Union, Baptist Student Union, and the enlistment 
of our men. 

3. Following this action Mr. Claude F. Gaddy of Raleigh was elected 
to this position, and L. L. Morgan was promoted to the position of Sun- 
day School Secretary. (Mr. Gaddy did not see fit to accept the position, 
and at a subsequent meeting of the special committee, to whom was given 
power to act, there was called to this position Rev. W. Perry Crouch, then 
pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church of Morganton. Mr. Crouch accepted 
and began his work with the Board on August 1.) 

4. A resolution was passed authorizing the borrowing of $15,000 for the pur- 
pose of reimbursing Southwide Objects for money due them. (Subsequently, 
$15,000 was borrowed, at an interest rate of 5 per cent and payable during the 
years 1936, 1937 and 1938, from the Wachovia Bank & Trust Company of 
Raleigh.) 

5. The Board adopted the general promotion plans for the fall. (These 
plans will be found outlined in another section of this report.) 



Annual of Session 1936 57 

III. DEPARTMENT OF MISSIONS 

106. A. HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONS 

During the twelve months ending September 30, 1935, we have forwarded 
for all Southwide objects $173,819.90. During a corresponding period ending 
September 30, 1935, we forwarded $148,803.53, a gain of $25,016.37. For the 
year ending September 30, 1934, we forwarded $120,208.34. Undesignated funds 
for Southwide objects, after deducting $25,000 annually for Southern Baptist 
Convention Bonds, are divided as follows : 

Per Cent 

Foreign Mission Board 50 

Home Mission Board 23 1/3 

Relief and Annuity Board 7 

Education Board 3 1/3 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 4 1/5 

Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 4 1/5 

Baptist Bible Institute 3 9/10 

W. M. U. Training School 8/15 

American Baptist Theological Seminary 1 

New Orleans Baptist Hospital 2 1/2 

100 

Of course all designated funds, without any deduction whatever, go directly 
to the object specified. 

107. B. STATE MISSIONS 

We rejoice to report that State Missions came to the end of 1935 not 
only with no debt but with a credit balance of about $12,000. This was made 
possible because of a greatly reduced budget during the past four years, and 
because the offering for this particular object was the largest since before 1927. 

We are operating during 1936 on an enlarged budget, by virtue of the 
action of the 1935 Convention. No debt, however, is anticipated. We 
make herewith a brief report concerning what has been undertaken, together 
with some brief comments upon the State Mission Program as a whole. 

We call attention to the enlarged and enlarging task of State Missions. We 
are now undertaking ten separate activities in the work. A glance at the 
outline of the work as recorded in the following" pages presents the varied tasks 
of State Missions. The report, however, shows one task of State Missions 
which, in reality, we have not as yet undertaken, viz. : A Ministry to the Prison 
Population. Surely at the earliest moment possible this work should become a 
definite part of our State Mission Program. 

The Convention of 1935 created a special committee to recommend a pro- 
gram for aiding former prisoners. Dr. M. L. Skaggs is the chairman of the 
committee. He has given much study to the subject, and we believe his report 
will be read with great interest and profit. 

It must be remembered, too, that State Missions is a sort of S. O. S., that 
is to say the Service of Supply for all other objects. Our failure to provide for 
an adequate and aggressive State Mission Program will soon result in our 
failure along all lines. 



58 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

108. 1. General Missionaries 

We record here with enthusiasm our appreciation of the effective and sacri- 
ficial service of the general missionaries, M. O. Alexander, J. C. Pipes and 
Charles H. Dickey. Mr. Alexander and Mr. Pipes have given their time largely 
to the churches, partly in evangelistic meetings but mostly in holding steward- 
ship revivals. For the first six months of the year Mr. Dickey gave his time to 
assisting the management of the Biblical Recorder in an effort to increase the 
circulation. A partial result of his efforts will be found in the increased cir- 
culation of the Recorder as given elsewhere in this report. During the second 
six months of the year he has been giving his time partly to publicity for the 
Convention and partly to stewardship revivals. 

Day and night these Convention servants have labored. We are advancing 
along all lines, and this advance is due in part to their efficient service. We re- 
cord not only our deep appreciation but also submit a summary of their 
activities during the year. 

109. (<7.) REPORT OF M. 0. ALEXANDER, GENERAL MISSIONARY 

Beginning with November 1, 1935, this report covers in outline my activities 
to October 31, 1936. 

In the fall of 1935 Stewardship Schools were conducted in eleven associa- 
tions, reaching definitely more than eighty churches. During the Convention 
year I have 

Assisted 16 churches in church revivals. 

Supplied pulpits for our pastors in 12 churches. 

Delivered 18 special addresses on our promotion work. 

Assisted in 9 Pastors' Conferences. 

Addressed 7 Men's Meetings. 

Assisted in 2 schools for pastors. 

Attended 6 meetings of associations in special conferences, visited 11 associa- 
tions in annual meetings. 

Attended meetings of 3 special committees with reference to our Statewide 
work and 2 with reference to Southwide work. 

Attended 3 conventions, the General State Convention, the State Sunday 
School Convention and the Southern Convention. 

Spent one week in conference of all state secretaries of the south at Ridge- 
crest. 

Visited many of our state missionaries on their fields and assisted 6 of them 
in special meetings. 

Worked in 14 associations with promotion committees in preparation for 
Stewardship Schools this fall. These schools are in progress as this report is 
written, having been completed in 3 associations. 

I suggest that all of our pastors use James 2:14-20 in their preaching. The 
least of all of our problems is the problem of finances. 

110. (b.) REPORT OF J. C. PIPES, GENERAL MISSIONARY 

Your General Missionary, J. C. Pipes, came with us on September 1, 1935. 

Since then he has been engaged in varied work. 



Annual of Session 1936 59 

He has held four meetings : One of 6 days at Brookford, three of 10 days 
each at Pine Branch, Roan Mt. and West Canton. 

Attended four Men's Meetings : Marion, Asheville, Bryson City and Boone, 
respectively. 

Attended 3 Pastor's Conferences of 2 days each ati Bryson City, Andrews, 
and Boone. 

Attended 13 Preliminary Associational meetings in the spring. 

Attended one Pastors' School at Mars Hill. 

Supplied in 15 pulpits. 

Held personally or supervised 128 Stewardship Revivals in 12 associations. 

Visited and spoke in 11 associations. 

Delivered 278 sermons and addresses during the year and held innumerable 
conferences with groups arranging for Stewardship Revivals, etc. 

In the four meetings held there were 165 professions of religion and re- 
newals. 

The Board has received from the churches helped as a direct result of 
meetings $264.98. 

111. (f.) REPORT OF C. H. DICKEY, PUBLICITY DIRECTOR 

Came with the Board September 1, 1935, and began work of publicity and 
field undertakings. After the Convention at Asheville spent the remaining 
part of the weeks until the holidays in holding Stewardship Schools, doing 
the Convention's publicity work and visiting the churches and associations. 

For the first six months of 1936, the time was spent in the interest of the 
Biblical Recorder. Traveled almost constantly over the Statae between Char- 
lotte and Wilmington, between Winston-Salem and Elizabeth City, between the 
Virginia and South Carolina lines. During this time, promoted the club plan, 
spoke in many churches, interviewed scores of pastors and, at the same time, 
looked after whatever publicity matters we deemed advisable. 

Beginning with June, 1936, I have given my time exclusively to the Con- 
vention work. Attended many pastors' conferences, men's meetings and the 
Raleigh and Chowan College Summer Schools for pastors. In August, began my 
work in the 12 associations assigned me and since then have been holding prelim- 
inary meetings, visiting associations, and holding and promoting Stewardship 
Revivals. 

During the Convention year, reported the Asheville Convention to the State 
press and have, from time to time, furnished the daily press, the press associa- 
tions and the weekly press whatever items we deemed advisable. In addition, 
have edited a full page on the Biblical Recorder for much of this time. 

112. 2. Missionary Pastoral Assistance 

We give below a summary of the work done by our 63 missionary pastors 
from October 1, 1935, to September 30, 1936. Let us bear in mind we had 86 
''in 1930, 47 in 1931, 40 in 1932, 48 in 1933, 56 in 1934, and 70 in 1935. We are 
on the incline again. 

Number of Missionary Pastors 63 

Number Churches Served 133 

Sermons 6,208 



60 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Other Addresses 2,312 

Revivals Held 171 

Training Classes Conducted 307 

Visits made 19,960 

Conversions 1,501 

Baptisms 889 

Other Additions 687 

Churches Repaired or Being Built 56 

Subscriptions to Charity and Children 152 

Subscriptions to Biblical Recorder 330 

Subscriptions to Home and Foreign Fields 9 

The following amounts were reported as collected in the 
churches during the year : 

Building and Repair $ 15,311 

Pastors' Salaries 30,874 

Undesignated Cooperative Program 5,702 

State Missions 444 

Home Missions 239 

Foreign Missions 704 

Education 73 

Hundred Thousand Club 100 

Orphanage 2,885 

Aid in Evangelistic Meetings". 540 

Hospital 374 

Margaret Fund and Training School 24 

Oteen 6 

113. 3. Church Building Aid 

The Board is doing what it can to aid churches here and there in lifting 
debts on buildings, constructing new buildings and in repairing others. It is 
our hope that this year we shall be able to aid, in small amounts to be sure, about 
twenty-two churches. A list of those approved so far follows : 

Forest Avenue Piedmont 

Boone Three Forks 

Arlington Street Roanoke 

Murf reesboro West Chowan 

Wingate Union 

Gold Hill Rowan 

Hilliard Memorial Piedmont 

West Marion Blue Ridge 

Cullowhee Tuckaseigee 

Nine Mile Atlantic 

Center View Gaston 

Front Street South Yadkin 

Deep Creek Montgomery 

Mt. Elim Robeson 

Ephesus Tennessee River 

Victory Gastonia 

Deaver View Buncombe 

Murphy Second Western North Carolina 

West Jefferson Ashe 

Carolina Avenue Liberty 

Lemon Springs Sandy Creek 

Pleasant Grove Green River 



Annual of Session 1936 61 

114. 4. The Work with our Indian Brothers 

We report the continuance of Rev. and Airs. M. C. Lunsford as workers 
among the Indians of Robeson County, and record our appreciation of the 
splendid work they have done and are doing there. 

It will be remembered that some years ago the Home Mission Board found 
itself unable to carry on the work among the Cherokees in Swain County. At 
that time our General Board came to the rescue. During that period W. F. 
Sinclair and W. H. Fitzgerald served under our Board, after the resignation 
of J. N. Lee. At the first of this year the Home Board informed us that they 
were ready to assume the responsibility for the work there. Brother Fitzgerald 
was retained and is carrying on the work in a fine way. 

115. 5. The Work with our Negro Brothers 

Rev. W. C. Somerville, who made his first report to the Convention last 
year, has done a most effective and far-reaching work during the current year. 
We record our joy because of the progress which the Negroes are making under 
his excellent leadership. His report, a summary of which follows, is encourag- 
ing to us all. His task has been : 

1. To awaken and vitalize the Christian consciousness of the Negro Baptists 
of North Carolina in the Kingdom of God. 

2. To frankly and sincerely face the present-day problems which confront 
the ministers of Christ, the membership of our churches, and the larger prob- 
lems of the Kingdom. 

3. To establish good-will and confidence among our churches in the Con- 
vention program. 

4. To develop the spirit of racial good-will throughout the state. 

5. To inculcate the spirit of consistent giving by the churches to the Con- 
vention objects. 

6. To develop denominational love and pride. 

7. To unify all of our work into a regular consistent organization. 

8. To enlarge and make more effective a consistent program of religious 
education, missions, and evangelism. 

9. To organize Daily Vacation Bible Schools, Leadership Training Courses, 
and Teacher Training Courses. 

10. Make periodical visitations to the various ministers in order to inspire 
them in Kingdom Building. 

During the past twelve months I have : 

Directed a Baptist Conclave in August which brought more than 3,500 
church representatives to Raleigh. 

Preached 146 sermons. 

Delivered 253 lectures. 

Attended 27 Associations. 

Visited 326 ministers. 

Spoken to approximately 23,000 persons at various meetings and traveled 
27,635 miles. 

With the continued support of the Baptist State Convention of North Caro- 
lina, I hope to achieve the following objects during the future: 



62 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

1. To bring to fruition a program of unification among our various organ- 
izations. 

2. To enlarge our program of religious education throughout the state: 

a) Hope to secure the service of an assistant who will give his full time to 
Sunday school and B. Y. P. U. work. 

b) To have a commission appointed to study religious educational needs in 
each section of the state. 

3. To urge a continuous growth in regular and consistent support of Mis- 
sions and Christian Education. 

4. To continue a ceaseless effort to raise the moral, educational, and spiritual 
development of our clergy and laity. 

5. Plan for our Baptist Conclave of 1940. 

6. To conduct a ministers' school at Shaw University during the month of 
June. 

116. 6. The Oteen Mission 

We record again our appreciation of the distinguished work which Brother 
Wayne W. Williams continues to do at Oteen, both in the hospital and in the 
church. Moreover, his contacts and influence with the pastors in the western 
part of the state is wholesome and helpful to the whole State Mission enter- 
prise. Concerning the work at Oteen, we rejoice to report that other states ap- 
preciate the work he is doing to the extent that they are having some share in 
its maintenance. A brief report from Mr. Williams follows : 

In the mountains of Western North Carolina, six miles east of Asheville, 
is located the U. S. Veterans Administration Hospital for the treatment of 
tuberculosis among World War veterans. Situated on a sunny plateau, with 
"Hemorrhage Hill" in the background, and surrounded on all sides by the em- 
purpled hills, it is beautiful in its setting. 

Eight hundred brave men and women, wards of a grateful nation, are con- 
fined in this great institution. They are fighting now a greater battle than that 
of Flanders Fields. Daily, hourly, the drama of life and death goes on. Some- 
where in America, the sun sets every evening on the fresh-made grave of 
some World Waf veteran who has "gone West" in one of Uncle Sam's hos- 
pitals. 

For fifteen years, first under the Home Board and more recently under our 
State Board, Baptists have been ministering to these men and their families, 
many of whom live hard by the reservation, in the name of the Great Physician. 
Visiting the sick, burying the dead, saving sinners, comforting saints, preach- 
ing the word, distributing Christian literature, corresponding with loved ones 
back home — these and many other activities have kept us busy and happy dur- 
ing this, the tenth, year of our sojourn on Oteen Hill. 

117. 7. Aid to the Deaf 

We have provided/ for a ministry to the deaf in our state. The program, 
as well as the appropriation, is small, but we record our appreciation to W. R. 
Hackney of Charlotte and G. C. Wilder of Asheville for their efforts. The 
amount expended provides only about enough to cover traveling expenses. 
These men, however, have touched a great many points in the state during the 



Annual of Session 1936 63 

past year, and the reports which they send in are most encouraging. We should 
by all means continue this work. Mr. Hackney says : 

The reception and attendance has been fine. The deaf attend the meetings 
with enthusiasm often coming long distances. They seem to get great joy 
and blessings out of the meetings, and feel that the Church is interested in them. 

The need is great for more permanent work in this field. 

It is said that there are some three thousand of these people in the state. 
It would be conservative to say that not more than five hundred of these peo- 
ple are ever contacted by church meetings and their various kinds of assem- 
blies. Herein we can say "where are the ninety and nine?" 

A great number of these people are Baptist by inclination, coming directly 
or indirectly from Baptist families. 

Up to October 1st, your Missionary has held seventeen services with an at- 
tendance of 610. In these services, seven have been converted. 

We are hoping and praying that this work will be enlarged, and be made 
permanent. 

118. 8. Sanatorium and Samarcand 

We record our appreciation to Rev. E. M. Harris, pastor at Aberdeen. An 
appropriation was made this year to enable Brother Harris to visit as often as 
possible Sanatorium and Samarcand. His work there has been highly signifi- 
cant. A good start has been made, and it is hoped that we can carry this work 
on even more successfully. A brief report from Brother Harris follows : 

The work at Sanatorium and Samarcand is different from all other State 
Mission work. There is no church organization of any denomination at either 
place. Both institutions are maintained by the state but are quite different in 
their purpose and service. They are mentioned here in the same report because 
the same pastor ministers at both places. 

At the Sanatorium there are 500 tubercular patients and they come from all 
sections of North Carolina. Possibly most of them are church, members and 
some were quite active in their churches back home. They greatly appreciate 
the efforts of your representative to bring a little sunshine and Gospel cheer 
into their lives. Two Sunday schools are maintained by the institution and 
some minister preaches there every Sunday. It is hard to tabulate your repre- 
sentative's work but he preaches at the Sanatorium every month, has prayer 
service in rooms and wards occasionally and makes many visits to individual 
patients. There are frequent requests for personal visits to loved ones. We 
welcome such requests. 

At Samarcand there are 170 girls from 9 to 18 years of age. These girls 
are all wards of the state, sent there by the courts of North Carolina. We 
preach there regularly every month and make special visits when an occasion 
presents itself. Our Woman's Missionary Society has asked the privilege of 
organizing a Y. W. A. among the Baptist girls. Birthday greetings are sent 
to each Baptist girl. An unusually large percentage of the girls are either 
Baptist or Baptist inclined, placing a great responsibility upon us. This is in- 
deed first-hand mission work. The vital need here is for some one to show 
a real interest in them. 



64 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

119. 9. The Pastors' Circulating Library 

In this library we now have about 500 books. We have continued to send 
out books on request all during the year, thus rendering the pastors a very 
valuable service. We had hoped to make an expenditure for some new books, 
but have not been able to do it. 

We would urge the pastors to send to the office in Raleigh any books they 
can spare which they think would be helpful to their brother pastors. We 
would urge them also to avail themselves of this service. The office in Ra- 
leigh agrees to send two books to any pastor requesting them. The Board will 
pay the postage. The only expense to the pastor is postage for returning the 
books to the Raleigh office. A card| to the General Secretary will bring full 
information. 

120. 10. Pastors' Schools and Conference 

We are happy to report that about a dozen Pastors' Conferences were held 
early in the year. These are quiet two day meetings, and in our opinion no 
more effective meetings are held during the year. We trust the Convention 
will continue these, and urge all pastors to attend them. The meetings 
this year were attended by about three to four hundred pastors. 

In accordance with the authority and plans provided by the last Convention, 
we had three Pastors' Schools, one at Meredith College, one at Mars Hill Col- 
lege, and one at Chowan College. The program directors were T. H. King, 
G. C. Cox and J. L. Garrick. To these men the thanks of the Board are due 
in generous measure. At Mars Hill Dr. Hersey Davis and Dr. B. W. Spilman 
led the group in New Testament interpretation and expository preaching. The 
attendance was larger than ever before, about one hundred in fact. It is hoped 
that at least two hundred will be at Mars Hill next year. At Meredith and 
Chowan Dr. E. M. Poteat, Sr., and Dr. Spilman composed the faculty. 

The platform hours at Meredith were superb, with such speakers as Dr. 
Frederick W. Norwood of London, Dr. Sun of China, our own Dr. Sampey 
and Dr. Yates and Dr. Franklin of Crozer. 

We trust the Convention will authorize the continuance of these schools, 
and that the pastors will attend them in increasing numbers. 

121. IV. DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

We are beginning to see Christian Education as one great task whether it is 
undertaken by churches in their church buildings, or whether it is undertaken 
by Christian colleges on their campuses. . Moreover, it is the same task, 
whether it is carried on by the agency of the Sunday school, the B. T. U., 
the B. S. U., the W. M. U. or the Brotherhood. Then also it is becoming in- 
creasingly clear that we have in our educational efforts much duplication. In 
fact the work of some of the agencies which have grown up overlap at several 
points. We believe the time has come to make a start in an effort to avoid 
this overlapping. There is urgent need for coordination, simplification, and cor- 
relation. 

With this in mind the General Board in its June meeting announced a 
change in the present set up of our work and provided for a secretary of 
Christian Education, whose duties it would be to think in terms of and work 



Annual of Session 1936 65 

out a program, gradually of course, in line with the ideas stated above. To 
this position Rev. W. Perry Crouch, then pastor of Calvary Church in Mor- 
ganton, was called. He began his work with the Board on August 1. He 
has a fine appreciation of the task involved and has given himself to it with 
abandon, although for sixty or ninety days he has given his time in large 
measure to stewardship revivals in the churches. It is proposed that he shall 
have general oversight of the Sunday school, B. T. U., B. S. U., and men's 
work ; or in other words, that part of the whole Christian education program 
which must take place in the churches themselves. It is not proposed that 
he devote his energies to the administrative and financial problems of the 
colleges. 

122. A. CHRISTIAN EDUCATION IN THE CHURCHES 

The first of August, at the request of the General Board, I came to the 
work of Secretary of the Department of Christian Education. I came to the 
work with the consciousness of the enormous opportunities that are ours to 
serve in this capacity. I pledge to North Carolina Baptists my best in a pro- 
gram which we hope will reach and help every Baptist church in North Caro- 
lina. 

The reports from the different divisions of our work will follow in detail. 
We hope you will read them carefully. 

The Sunday School work suffered a distinct loss in the resignation of the 
beloved Perry Morgan. Mr. Morgan had served North Carolina Baptists 
long and well, and they loved him. However, Mr. L. L. Morgan has been 
elected Secretary of our Sunday school work and has brought a great report 
to the Convention this year. Particularly is the Summer Campaign work 
notable. We hope to add a field worker to this division of our work soon. 

The Training Department has likewise suffered a loss in the resignation 
of Miss Winnie Rickett. For four years she had been B. T. U. Secretary and 
was loved by people all over North Carolina. However, Miss Mabel Starnes 
was named Associate Secretary and has carried on the work most effectively. 
At least one other worker is needed in this department at once, and we hope 
to take care of this need soon. The B. T. U. Department under Miss Starnes' 
leadership has had a splendid year as her report will indicate. 

In addition to the workers in Sunday school and B. T. U., Miss Velma 
Preslar is office Secretary and will also do field work in these two depart- 
ments and in Baptist Student work. 

Miss Cleo Mitchell continues in the work as Student Secretary at 
the Woman's College of the University, at Greensboro. Meredith employs a 
full time Student Secretary, and we are helping in the support of Mr. Lon 
Robinson, Student Secretary at Wake Forest. Student workers are greatly 
needed at Cullowhee, Boone, East Carolina Teachers' College, Chapel Hill, and 
State College, Raleigh. It is our hope that we can add these workers soon. 

We are outlining a program among the men of our state for the spring 
of 137. Through group meetings of various kinds, we hope to reach at least 
25,000 laymen during next year. 

In all of this work we hope to bring a closer spirit of cooperation and 
where possible, correlation. Some definite plans for correlation of work, par- 
ticularly meetings involving Sunday school, B. T. U., and Promotion are now 



66 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

being tried in some of our Associations. We hope that this will be the be- 
ginning of a vitalized and coordinated program of education in our churches. 
The reports of the different divisions of our work follow: 

123. 1. DIVISION OF SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

L. L. Morgan, Secretary 

It is with a deep sense of gratitude to God that we come to make this 
annual report of our stewardship of the matters entrusted to our care. God has 
been good and our people have been kind and cooperative in all of our work. 
Interest in Bible Study and teaching has grown steadily throughout the year, 
and progress has been made along many lines. For lack of help we have 
had to say no to many challenging calls from needy places throughout the state. 

We express our thanks : 1. To our General Secretary, the General Board 
and to the Sunday School Board for the financial assistance which made 
a great year possible. 

2. To that loyal and capable group of summer workers, and to the hun- 
dreds of volunteer workers who have so faithfully helped us during the year. 

3. To the Biblical Recorder for space in the paper where week by week we 
keep before our people interesting facts about our work. 

Workers in the department: Sunday School Secretary, L. L. Morgan, is 
now in his eleventh year with the Department and in his first year as Secre- 
tary. Air. Perry Morgan's leaving February 1st has more than doubled the of- 
fice responsibility. However, it has been possible for us to conduct twenty- 
two Sunday School Revivals, attend eight Conventions and make more than 
forty speeches at Associational meetings and rallies. 

Office Secretary, Miss Bessie Morgan, now in her tenth, year, is a devout 
Christian worker. Her task is to run die office in the absence of the Secre- 
tary, and while he is here cooperate in the work. She has handled nearly 17,000 
awards and literally hundreds of pieces of mail during the year. 

Approved and qualified workers: For a number of years, by courtesy 
of the Sunday School Board, we have been permitted occasionally to use 1 Ap- 
proved and Qualified workers in the different departments. They receive pay 
for only the weeks they work. The workers now are as follows : Mrs. C. D. 
Bain, Dunn, Approved Elementary Worker ; Mrs. A. V. Washburn, Goldsboro, 
and Mrs. F. A. Bower, Albemarle, Qualified Elementary Workers; Mrs. W. 
Perry Crouch, Raleigh, Approved Intermediate Worker ; Mr. James Morgan, 
Durham, Approved Young People's Worker, and Mrs. M. D. Herndon, Gas- 
tonia, Approved Extension Worker. 

Promotional projects : State Sunday School Convention. January 21-23 
at the First Baptist Church, Charlotte, more than 2,000 of our people from ev- 
ery section of the state gathered for a great Sunday School Convention. The 
personnel of the program was the best in the Sunday School field, and our 
people were greatly helped in solving their problems. 

Associational Officers Training Conference. By courtesy of the Sunday 
School Board, 800 of our Associational leaders met at Hickory for a two- 
day training conference March 19-20. Under the same plan our 1937 confer- 
ence will be held January 21-22. The place will be announced later. 



Annual of Session 1936 67 

Ridgecrest Conference. The South-wide Sunday School Conference at 
Ridgecrest, July 19-26, was well attended by our North Carolina folks, and 
almost every section of our state was represented. We are fortunate to have 
this conference in our state each year, and we urge that more of our people 
attend next year. 

Vacation bible schools : We now have a record of approximately 180 
Vacational Bible Schools that were held during June, July and August. This 
is a good increase over last year's record when we were crippled by the in- 
fantile paralysis epidemic, and also over our 1934 total of 102. With the finan- 
cial assistance of the Sunday School Board we secured the services of Mrs. 
John B. Lane, Mrs. A. V. Washburn and Mr. M. L. Jones for the promotion 
work in March and April. To them is due most of the credit for such a fine 
record. 

Teacher training awards : The most encouraging thing about our work 
is the fact that 16,678 awards have been issued from October 1, 1935, to Oc- 
tober 1, 1936. This is a gain of 10,922 over last year and the largest number 
of any year in the history of our department. 

Associational training schools : J. W. Costner of Lawndale, Superin- 
tendent of Sunday School work in the Kings Mountain Association, conducted 
a week of simultaneous training in forty-three churches, September 13-20, 
using volunteer teachers within the association. Fifteen hundred people were 
enrolled in the classes and more than six hundred awards were given. 

Miss Ruth Tucker conducted a similar project in the Randolph Association 
with twenty-two churches participating and William B. Batts conducted one 
in Nash County with seventeen churches taking part. We really seem to be 
on the threshold of a new era in training work. The Associational organiza- 
tion is our greatest avenue of approach. 

Young people's-adult and extension conference: Mr. William P. 
Phillips and Miss Verda Von Hagen of Nashville, Tennessee, assisted us in 
a City-Wide Young People's Adult and Extension Conference at the First 
Baptist Church, Charlotte, October 4-9 More than three hundred and fifty 
people were in our conferences and nineteen churches were represented. 

Other work : Aside from our regular force and our summer workers, 
others have been called in at different times during the year to the extent 
that sixty-five extra weeks' work have been given to our department through 
the courtesy of the Sunday School Board and volunteer workers. 

We request: 1. That the Sunday School Department be given a field 
worker as soon as financial conditions will permit it. 

2. That the plan of conducting Sunday School Revivals be continued, 
and that sufficient appropriations be made to finance at least ten projects in 
1937. 

3. That Pastors and Superintendents join us in a concerted effort to en- 
large our Sunday School space, improve our teaching, and train our leaders. 

Summer workers in the east: The following associations were assisted 
by twenty-one of our finest and most efficient young people during the weeks 
of June 13-August 16 : Atlantic, Miss Ramona Brock ; Bladen, Mildred Brooks ; 
Brunswick and Dock, Zula Rogers ; Cape Fear-Columbus, Ethelene Cain ; 



68 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Central and Raleigh, Elma Currin ; Chowan, Lewis E. Ludlum ; Eastern, A. T. 
Usher ; Johnston, Katherine Martin ; Little River, Neva Harper ; Neuse, Ruth 
Yates ; New South River, Bill Dancey ; Pamlico, Charles Wagner ; Randolph, 
Ruth Tucker ; Roanoke, Mr. and Mrs. O. Jack Murphy ; Robeson, Flora Mae 
Cavenaugh ; Sandy Creek, John Lambert ; Tar River, Louella Brown ; West 
Chowan, Ann Downey ; and the Wilmington, Maude Jones. 

The service rendered by these faithful workers cannot be tabulated except 
in part. The vision, encouragement, inspiration and organizations, cannot be re- 
corded. We report a few facts : 

Number of classes taught or directed 214 

Number of people reached 9,885 

Number of awards given '. 1,649 

Summer work in the west: Perhaps the most effective work of the 
year was accomplished through our Sunday School Revivals west of Asheville 
during the time of June 13-August 16. Here, too, it is impossible to record 
fully the valuable service rendered by these faithful servants. The following 
table partially tells the story : 



Annual of Session 1936 



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70 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

124. 2. DIVISION OF BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 

Miss Mabel Starnes, Associate Secretary 
Mrs. J. E. Tharrington, Office Secretary 

This is the first report to be made by the Associate Secretary, who has 
served for four years as field worker in the Baptist Training Union Depart- 
ment. Miss Winnie Rickett, Secretary of the Department, was married June 
2, 1936, to Rev. J. Winston Pearce. The department lost by her resignation 
one who has for eleven years rendered invaluable service to the young people 
of North Carolina. Constantly alert, deeply consecrated and zealous in her 
work, she was worthy of the trust imposed in her by the Baptist State Con- 
vention. Airs. J. E. Tharrington, who has been the capable and efficient office 
secretary for eleven years, has been indispensable during these days of extra 
work and strain. 

We herein give an account of our work for the past year. The first half 
of the year's work, however, is not complete, because of the sudden resigna- 
tion of the secretary of the department. 

General objectives : Many in our state do not yet fully appreciate the 
real purpose of the Training Union work in our churches, so we herein quote 
the general objectives for which our Training Union exists and for which we 
are striving. 

1. To establish the Baptist Training Union more thoroughly in the think- 
ing of our people as the church program for training all church members, 
and as an essential element in the Christian educational program of every 
Baptist church. 

2. To make substantial progress in the enlistment of all our people in all 
our church and denominational life through a permanently effective means of 
enlistment, namely, the training process. 

3. To present God's challenge to our young Christians to meet the de- 
mands of the new day with a complete dedication of lives to the Master 
in any life calling into which He might direct them, and to be ready at all 
times to respond to His call to preach the Gospel at home or in the uttermost 
parts of the earth, or to enter any other field of Christian service as a vocation. 

4 To fortify our people with the truth and to equip them better through 
Christian training to meet the issues — social, racial, economic, political and 
religious — of the complex age in which we live. 

Evidences of enlargement and growth — Associational Enlargement En- 
deavors: January 26-31 was given to an Associational- wide study course at 
Gastonia for the Gaston County Association. Mr. W. A. Harrell of Nashville, 
Tennessee, assisted the State leaders in this project. Inclement weather condi- 
tions defeated the plan for enlargement, but about thirteen churches partici- 
pated with an attendance of approximately two hundred. The week was con- 
sidered most helpful, especially in laying a foundation for future development. 

March 1-6 an Associational study course was held in Buncombe Associa- 
tion. Approximately thirty churches participated and the attendance ran to 
around five hundred. Mr. E. E. Lee and Mr. W. A. Harrell from the Sunday 
School Board at Nashville, Tennessee, assisted in this project also. 



Annual of Session 1936 71 

March 22-27 a district school was held for the churches of the Burlington 
■district of Mount Zion Association. The State leaders were assisted by local 
talent. Several churches were reached and the week's work registered a suc- 
cess. 

September 27-October 2 a City-Wide Study Course and Enlargement Week- 
was directed by C. Aubrey Hearn of the Sunday School Board. Nashville, 
Tennessee. It proved to be a great success and during the week more than 
eight hundred young people were enrolled in the classes in various churches. 

November 1-6 an Associational-Wide Study Course will be held in Robeson 
Association. The services of Mr. J. E. Lambdin of the Sunday School Board 
were secured. More than sixty churches of the association will participate and 
hundreds of young people will be enlisted. 

Summer Extension Work: For six weeks during the summer the Associate 
Secretary tried an experiment never attempted before by the department. The 
volunteer services of twelve college students were secured for six week's work 
in six mountain associations. A week's work was given to each of the fol- 
lowing associations : Surry, Avery, Liberty, Three Forks, Alexander and 
Brushy Mountain. During these six weeks the young people taught 85 study 
courses in 37 different churches, but contacted about 60 churches, organized 
35 new organizations, visited in 250 different homes and reached more than 
2,500 young people during this time. It was a noble service they rendered 
and the department wishes here to again express deep gratitude for the serv- 
ices rendered by this group, who were: Fred Lipe, Asheville ; James Brown, 
Asheville; Ted Jollay, Durham; Daphne Penny, Raleigh; W'ila Marks, Rock- 
ingham; Edith Johnson, Murfreesboro ; Eloise Guy, Statesville ; Helen Melton, 
Hendersonville ; Mrs. John Cashion, Wilkesboro, and Zubie Ingle, Statesville. 

Twenty workers were placed in twenty associations in the eastern section 
of the state for nine weeks. These workers reported 74 study courses taught, 
691 awards, and 2,074 people reached. This was another great step in en- 
largement. 

State Leadership Conference: On July 3rd, the First State Leadership 
Conference for Associational officers was held at Ridgecrest. Approximately 
five hundred associational leaders and officers attended from the sixty-one 
associations organized in Baptist Training Union work in North Carolina, 
leaving only two organized associations not represented in the conference. 

It would be impossible to estimate the value of this conference. The South - 
wide leaders, Air. and Mrs. J. E. Lambdin, Mr. W. A. Harrell, Mr. Aubrey 
Hearn and Dr. Clay I. Hudson, were present and conducted conferences and 
worked very definitely with our state leaders and associational leaders con- 
cerning their problems and making plans for greater growth and development. 
The Sunday School Board furnished free transportation for all associational 
offcers, which enabled so many to come. We are grateful for this help from 
•our Sunday School Board. 

The following goals for the next five years were set by the leaders attend- 
ing the State Leadership Conference : 



72 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

North Carolina Goals for Five Year Program 

Goals for New 
No. in Organizations 

N. C. on and New Members 

Jan. I, 1936 by Jan. 1, 1941 

1. Training Unions, with at least a director.... 469 1,000 

2. Enrolment Training Unions 62,116 109,000 

3. Junior B. Y. P. U.'s 649 500 

4. Junior Enrolment 16,691 7,500 

5. Intermediate B. Y. P. U.'s 678 500 

6. Intermediate Enrolment 16.206 7,500 

7. Senior B. Y. P. U.'s 897 700 

8. Senior Enrolment 23,466 14,000 

9. B. A. U.'s 198 800 

10. B. A. U. Enrolment 4,340 14,000 

11. Associational Training Unions 57 13 

12. Organizations to be A-l at least one quarter 
each year 

Total in Goals for Goals for 

X. C. 1935 Totals, 1936 Totals, 1940 

(1) Training Unions 4 15 100 

(2) Junior B. Y. P. U.'s 47 75 200 

(3) Intermediate B. Y. P. U.'s 28 75 200 

(4) Senior B. Y. P. U.'s 37 75 250 

(5) B. A. U.'s 8 25 200 

(6) Associations — 6 30 

Goal for 
-V . Issued Goal for Five Years 

in 1935 1936 1936-1940 

13. Study Course Awards 13,645 15,000 75,000 

College Engagements: Baptist Student Union presidents. Baptist Training 
Union directors and college presidents have been most cooperative in planning 
and encouraging the study courses on the various college campuses. The Asso- 
ciate Secretary has given a week to each of the following colleges: Campbell, 
Western Carolina Teacher's College. Appalachian State Teachers' College, 
Mars Hill and Chowan colleges. Conferences and training camps have been 
held on other campuses. During these engagements some 900 students have been 
enlisted in the classes, representing about 600 different Baptist churches. 

The Regional Tours: Beginning on April 26 the Associate Secretary started 
on a tour of all twenty-one associations of the Southern and Central Regions, 
and contacted 107 churches with associational leaders, pastors and young peo- 
ple's leaders. At North Wilkesboro, Erlanger and Concord, 36 other churches 
of the 20 associations of the West Central Region were met. The main object 
of the tour was to stimulate interest in the Training Union work ; to see that 
every association was completely organized, to help with problems and to bring 
inspiration. Delegations to the State Leadership Conference were planned and 
detailed instructions given to associational officers. Approximately 1,200 pas- 
tors, leaders and officers attended these meetings. 

Local Church Engagements: Local church engagements have been empha 
sized. Many weeks have been given to this phase of the work. The object has 
been not only to strengthen the work of the local church, but to prepare it for 
leadership in doing extension work in the association. 

Regularly scheduled meetings : The annual meeting of the State 
B. T. U. Convention Assembly was held at Ridgecrest, July 5-10. The at- 
tendance ran about a thousand, and those who registered numbered six hundred. 
The program consisted of a series of study courses, a Bible study hour, con- 



Annual of Session 1936 73 

ferences dealing with social justice, war and peace, home ideals, economics, 
and similar issues, inspirational messages, and supervised recreation in the after- 
noons. Great hours of consecration were experienced and hundreds of young 
people dedicated their lives to the service of the Lord. 

Mr. Perry Morgan says: "It was one of the most deeply moving, most 
helpful assemblies I have ever attended." 

Dr. C. J. Allen wrote : "The young people came away with a stronger con- 
viction as to the reality of Christ, the urgency of His work, the supremacy of 
His church, and the sufficiency of His Spirit." 

First Regional Conventions: The Regional Conventions held in the spring 
showed an increased attendance and set new high standards for better pro- 
grams. The Eastern convention met in Goldsboro, the Southern at Rocking- 
ham, the Central at High Point, the West Central at Shelby, and the Western 
at Sylva. The average attendance at these meetings was about three hundred. 

The Regional Conventions for 1937 are scheduled as follows: Eastern at 
Elizabeth City, March 12-13; Southern at Lumberton, .March 19-20; Central 
at Burlington, March 26-27; West Central at Mount Airy, April 2-3; West 
ern at Hendersonville, April 9-10. 

A word of appreciation should be expressed here for the Regional presi- 
dents who work so faithfully and so earnestly the year round in promoting the 
interest of the Training Union work, traveling hundreds of miles at their own 
expense to speak in associational meetings, to teach study courses and to or- 
ganize new unions. These gallant young men who serve as regional presidents 
are: Eastern, Rev. James Smith, Williamston ; Southern, Mr. Truby Powell, 
Lillington ; Central. Mr. James Morgan, Durham ; West Central, Mr. Wyan 
Washburn, Shelby ; Western, Rev. Nathan Brooks, Bryson City. With the 
very limited state force the work would have been terribly handicapped had it 
not been for the service rendered by these officers. 

Associational Conventions: In the Baptist Training Union organization of 
the State there are 72 associations, two of these being Indian, Burnt Swamp 
and Cherokee. Sixty-one of this number have Baptist Training Union associa- 
tional organizations which function in varying degrees. All have held annual 
conventions, a majority hold quarterly district meetings. In many of them 
the officers are endeavoring to reach every church with a training union, teach- 
ing study courses and setting up goals for enlargement and growth. 

Office: The most rigid economy has been practiced in the use of literature, 
stationery and postage, but at the same time we have sought not to weaken the 
effectiveness of our work. There has been much to do getting out necessary 
periodic material, and free literature mailed to new unions and others on re- 
quest. Thousands of letters; of personal correspondence have been sent. The 
Baptist Training Union page of the Biblical Recorder has been edited each week 
by the department. 

The vear's record: Owing to the fact that Training Union officers are 
usually reelected ever}- six months and young people do not send lists of new 
officers, it is hard to keep an accurate record of unions in the state. The mail- 
ing list was revised very recently and unions from which we had received no 
reports for the past three or four years were dropped from the list. Therefore, 



74 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

we make the following report, which may suggest a falling off in our work 
but which is not really the case : 

Associational Baptist Training Unions 61 

Baptist Training Unions 501 

Baptist Adult Unions 203 

Senior Unions 923 

Intermediate Unions 703 

Junior Unions 677 

Story Hours 28 

Grand total of new organizations in North Carolina 75 

Study Course Awards 14,545 

Conclusion : We are grateful to our Heavenly Father for the great year 
he has given us in Training Union work. To the Convention, to the Baptist 
Sunday School Board and to the General Board we are grateful for the finan- 
cial support received from them. We appreciate, too, more than we can ex- 
press, the hearty cooperation, the fellowship and loyal support given by the 
pastors and Training Union friends throughout the state. Mr. Huggins has ex- 
hibited the finest spirit of interest in our young people, proving to be a wise, 
consecrated leader and a real friend. 

We express the most earnest urge and burden of our heart in the desire that 
the time will soon come when the contributions to the Cooperative Program 
will increase to the extent that the Baptist Training Union Department of 
North Carolina may be equipped with a leadership adequate to meet our pos- 
sibilities throughout the state. 

125. 3. DIVISION OF BAPTIST STUDENT UNION 

Cleo Mitchell 

"The development of student religious work in the South as well as through- 
out the nation," according to Frank H. Leavell, Executive Secretary of the De- 
partment of Southern Baptist Student Work, "is decidedly by the various de- 
nominations whereas in former decades inter-denominational leadership was 
largely responsible for the promotion of student religious work. We find today 
that the various denominations are promoting their own programs, putting into 
it an investment of money and life which was formerly unthought of. Within the 
past year there has been a gratifying activity on the part of State Mission Boards 
in establishing, for the promotion of Baptist Student Union Work in their 
states, a B. S. U. Department of State Mission activity." In North Carolina a 
department of Christian Education, of which student work is a part, has been 
established with W. Perry Crouch as Secretary. Two new Student Secretaries 
on local campuses have been placed — Miss Mildred Kichline at Meredith Col- 
lege, and Zon Robinson at Wake Forest College. The Student Secretary, or 
"Spiritual Coach,' r on the local campus is truly the arm of the church reach- 
ing the students and always linking them to Christ and His church. Our goal 
is such a coach on each campus in North Carolina. 

In cooperation with the department of Southern Baptist Student Work, 
emphasis has been laid within our program in North Carolina on certain prin- 
ciples. We "approach the students through the churches in college centers, 
making the church the central unit of activity in and through which all pos- 
sible religious activity is directed." Emphasis is laid on local church member- 



Annual of Session 1936 75 

ship and a normal church life while in college. In the denominational program 
we are seeking "to match the physical and intellectual development of students 
with a corresponding spiritual development." The Baptist Student Union, 
which serves as a connecting link between the church and the campus, is com- 
posed of the same unit organizations as found in the local church ; namely, Sun- 
day School, Baptist Training Union, and Young Woman's Auxiliary. On many 
campuses we find, for the promotion of spiritual development, students, who 
plan to do full time religious work, having regular meetings of that group 
for practical discussion and for inspiration. On our campuses where there is 
a B. S. U. we find prayer mates — two or more students — meeting daily for 
prayer that the will of God may be done in their lives, on the campus, and in 
the world. The Baptist student leaders of our colleges are sufficiently con- 
cerned about the religious conditions on the campus to come to college several 
days before the opening of the fall session to plan and pray definitely for 
the year's program. Such pre-session Council retreats are held where there is 
a B. S. U. In each year's program personal evangelism and training in all phases 
of Christian activity are included. In North Carolina we have Baptist Student 
Union organizations on fourteen campuses. 

Last April the Baptist Student Union of Woman's College, Greensboro, was 
hostess to all the Baptist Student Union Councils in the state for a day of in- 
tensive training — and in September a state retreat of B. S. U. presidents and 
adult leaders was held for the first time in Raleigh. The entire denominational 
program was presented so that these interested leaders might promote such on 
the college campuses of North Carolina. 

During the summer, there were functioning Baptist Student Unions on the 
campuses where summer sessions were held. In this way teachers became in- 
formed of the denominational program for college students and can interest 
high school seniors in such aj program before they enter college ; and regular 
college students are kept in close touch with the church during the summer 
months. 

At Ridgecrest Southwide Student Retreat in June representatives from 
North Carolina colleges, to the extent of our assigned quota, found new zeal, 
instruction, and inspiration for advancing Kingdom work. In the five year 
program of the Sunday School Board, North Carolina students have gladly 
pledged their services. During the past summer scores of our choice, trained 
college youth served churches of our state by teaching study courses, conduct- 
ing Vacation Bible Schools, helping in organizing training and missionary 
organizations and teaching Sunday school classes. This host of volunteer work- 
ers proved a decided asset to Kingdom work through our denominational 
agencies. 

A dependable state B. S. U. organization has been maintained throughout 
the past several years. Al Martin, student at Wake Forest College, has served 
most efficiently during the past year. The annual convention held in Greens- 
boro, October 23-25 set a new mark in student work in our state by placing em- 
phasis in student living on seeking to know and live the keynote, "The Will of 
God." 

At Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, we have more 
than four hundred Baptist and Baptist preference students this year. Already 



76 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

half of them are actively enlisted in our church organizations. About a fourth 
have placed their letters in local Baptist churches and plans are under way for 
at least half to definitely pledge to missions and the support of the B. S. U. 
program on the campus. Daily personal evangelism is another goal for the 
year. Already one conversion and baptism have taken place among our group. 
The year's program comprises Student Sunday School Classes, B. T. U., 
Y. W. A., daily prayer meetings, study courses in each unit organization, Chris- 
tian recreation, promotion of Foreign Mission and Home Mission Offerings, 
group discussion of present youth problems, and daily help to students in spirit- 
ual development. 

To answer the quest of the thousands of our eager, earnest, Christian youth 
in North Carolina colleges, our denomination is seeking to give the highest 
and best in Christian training and development. The present and future will 
reveal the results of our program through the service of the Christian leader- 
ship being trained today. 

126. 4 - REPORT OF BAPTIST MEN'S CONVENTION COMMITTEE 

R. N. Simms, Chairman 

In 1935, it will be recalled, we had one general meeting for men in Greens- 
boro. The attendance was around seven hundred. In 1936 there were provided 
nine regional meetings. The attendance at these meetings was in the neigh- 
borhood of two thousand. We feel that the program was unsurpassed, and 
while we were somewhat disappointed in the attendance upon these meetings, 
we feel that on the whole they were well worth while and resulted in getting 
a great, great number of our men to think more seriously upon matters per- 
taining to God's Kingdom. 

As we look to 1937, we are inclined to favor a program which will provide 
for a great men's meeting in each association in the state, or as nearly that as 
possible. We would suggest that these meetings be held on Sunday in some 
church located near the center of the Association, and that an effort be made 
to reach hundreds of our men who cannot come to one central state meeting, 
or even a regional meeting. We have found that many of our men cannot pos- 
sibly get away from their duties during the week and it is for this reason we 
are suggesting that these meetings for 1937 be held on Sunday. It is believed 
that in sixty meetings of this sort we can reach possibly 25,000 men. 

We cannot speak with certainty, but plans are under way to provide for 
Laymen's Week on the Ridgecrest program. In the event this is worked out, 
we would urge hundreds of our men to avail themselves of this opportunity 
next summer. We would not allow ourselves to get away from the idea of a 
great state-wide meeting for our men. but in view of the prospect of a week 
at Ridgecrest we suggest the associational meetings instead of the one central 
state meeting. In other words, the week at Ridgecrest would provide an op- 
portunity equivalent to the opportunity our men would have in a state-wide 
meeting. 

We record again the faith we have in our men once they are brought to 
get a wider Kingdom vision. We do know that the great task ahead of us is 
to reach our men so that they will be led to release the power they now con- 
trol for the support of every Kingdom interest. 



Annual of Session 1936 77 

127. b. christian education in the colleges 

1. Report of the Colleges 
(a.) wake forest college 

For the academic year 1935-1936 Wake Forest College reports: (1) An en- 
rollment in the regular session of 995. (2) An enrollment in the combined 
units of the summer session of 981, an increase over last year. (3) Admission 
of the Law School to membership in The Association of American Law 
Schools, and approval of the Law School by the American Bar Association. (4) 
Alterations, excavation, additional structures, and improvement of the Gore 
Athletic Field and the street approaching it. 

The internal organization of the College presents two rather definite achieve- 
ments for the year : 

1. The recognition of the growing demands upon instruction in the junior 
and senior classes. As a result of large numbers of junior college transfers 
the registration of courses in the last two years of the college has been in- 
creased. The departments have been very conscious of these demands and have 
modified their organization accordingly. This larger opportunity in the jun- 
ior-Senior years is regarded favorably. 

2. For the first time the enlargement of the physical plant has made pos- 
sible definite organization of the departments of instruction around centralized 
offices as headquarters and adjacent classrooms for the use of each department. 
Each department is now located with definite conveniences. This unity is prov- 
ing to be highly satisfactory to the departmental staffs as well as the conven- 
ience of students. This has been accomplished in some instances by assigning 
an entire building or entire floors or definite areas to the several departments. 

Additions and replacements to the faculty for the ensuing year are 
as follows : 

In medicine — Dr. R. P. Morehead and Dr. Herbert C. Tidwell ; in English — 
Dr. Edgar E. Folk and Dr. Guy A. Cardwell ; in physics — Dr. Sherwood 
Githens; in biology — Instructor Bruce Perry. Mr. Zon Robinson has been 
added as assistant to the chaplain and secretary of religious organizations. 

128. (/'.) MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Up to date there have been enrolled for the session of 1936-1937, 528 
students. Of these 35 are specials, 427 are boarders. The student body in- 
cludes five daughters of ministers on the Foreign Field. There are 13 states 
represented. Students come from 72 counties of North Carolina. 

After ten years of service in our office of Dean of Women, Miss Caroline 
Biggers resigned to accept a like position at Mars Hill College. The work of 
Miss Biggers was done with wonderful fidelity and efficiency and the students 
who came under her care will long remember her with unfailing affection. To 
rill the vacancy thus created Miss Mary Susan Steele was elected. Miss Steele 
is a graduate of Meredith, taught here for five years, holds the degree of Doc- 
tor of Philosophy from Cornell University, and was head of the English de- 
partment of Judson College for ten years, being also academic dean for the 
last three years. She has taken up with real enthusiasm the duties of the of- 
fice and we anticipate for her a highly successful administration. 



78 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Prof. Edgar H. Henderson succeeds Miss Florence Hoagland, resigned, as 
Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. Mr. Edgar H. Alden succeeds Miss 
Charlotte Armstrong, resigned, as Associate Professor of Violin. Miss Louise 
Lanham fills the vacancy made in the resignation of Miss Elizabeth Foster as In- 
structor in English. Mrs. H. A. List has been employed to carry on the work be- 
gun by Miss Hoagland in Oral English and Dramatics. Miss Mildred Kichline 
takes the place vacated by the resignation of Miss Marguerite Mason as Reli- 
gious Secretary. Miss Lucile Johnson is beginning the work of Registrar as a 
separate office. Miss Lois Byrd is directing our News Bureau. Miss Virginia 
Branch returns as Instructor of Piano, after leave of absence) for a year. All 
of these who have left us rendered excellent, service and made great places for 
themselves in our life. Those who come bring the best of credentials and 
we give them hearty welcome. 

There is a delightful spirit on the campus — enthusiastic and cooperative. 

129. (C.) CHOWAN COLLEGE 

At the close of the school year 1935-36 Chowan College was facing the ab- 
solute necessity of entering into a program of improvement and expansion. 
Such a program was demanded in order to do efficient work, to meet the needs 
of the youth of northeastern North Carolina, and to meet the accepted standards 
of schools and colleges. 

The enrollment on October 15, 1936, was 113, approximately the same that 
it was one year ago. This enrollment has been maintained in spite of the fact 
that Chowan College changed its financial policy to the effect that financial 
inducement is not offered to any student to attend college, with the exception 
of a sixty-five-dollar valedictorial scholarship. Students are required to pay 
their expenses in advance. No student gets in debt to the College. 

The faculty of Chowan College has been increased and strengthened. Dr. 
Athey G. Gillaspie, who holds the Ph.D. degree from Duke University, has suc- 
ceeded Miss Sara K. Liggett as head of the department of science. Dr. George 
W. F. Stripling, who holds the Ph.D. degree from the University of Illinois, 
has succeeded Miss Sara E. Martin as head of the department of modern for- 
eign languages. The following additions have been made to the faculty : Mr. 
London A. Sanders, who holds the M.S. degree from the University of Tennes- 
see, and who has had advanced training in commercial work, has been secured 
as commercial teacher. Mr. Ray Frank Fehrman, who holds the M.A. degree 
from the University of Kentucky, has become the assistant in the departments 
of science and history. Miss Sara Ann Bruce, graduate of Coker College, who 
has done considerable advanced work in physical education, has been secured 
as physical education director. Miss Dorothy Evans, who holds the B.S. 
degree from the School of Library Science of Simmons College. Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts, has been secured as librarian. Miss Carolynne Gay, who holds the 
B.A. degree with a major in home economics and science from Blue Mountain 
College, Mississippi, has been secured as dietitian. 

Improvements have been made in equipment. The library has been rear- 
ranged and is being brought up to date. The kitchen has been renovated and 
new equipment secured. The main building has been rewired, many rooms 
renovated, and other repairs made on buildings. Definite progress is being 



Annual of Session 1936 79 

made; in the College's campaign to secure improved and! larger equipment. It 
is expected that the College shall, within three years' time, be equipped to 
take care of a student body of 275, and that it shall ultimately be equipped to 
accommodate a student body of 300 to 350. 

130. (d.) MARS HILL COLLEGE 

Enrollment : The present enrollment, October 1, 1936, is 615 — 565 college stu- 
dents, 40 academy, and 10 special department students. These come from 80 
North Carolina counties and from 25 states and foreign countries. Every county 
west of Raleigh except two are represented. There are 39 ministerial students. 

Workers: Two new members of our staff add strength to our group — 
Miss Carolyn Biggers becoming Dean of Women, a position similar to the one 
held at Meredith for the past eleven years, and Mr. Fred Dickerson, who has 
been coach at Lees-McRae for three years coming as assistant coach and teacher 
in the academy. Miss Ella J. Pierce has won the Ph.D. degree from Cornell 
and returns to her place in the English department. Mr. J. B. Huff, who was 
out most of last year on account of illness, is again at his post. For many years 
now there have been few changes in our teaching force. Seventeen of our 
teachers live in homes of their own. 

Needs: The College has outgrown its quarters. There is imperative need 
of a modern science building, a fire-proof dormitory to care for a hundred 
young women, and a dining room large enough to accommodate our group 
at one sitting. It is hoped to have one of these under way before the session 
closes. 

Summer Meetings: The Mars Hill division of the Wake Forest-Meredith 
summer school lasts nine weeks and reaches more than 300 students. The 
School for Ministers though lasting only a week reaches more than a hun- 
dred pastors, and the Retreat conducted by Dr. W. N. Johnson has for ten 
years helped scores of ministers. 

131. (<?.) CAMPBELL COLLEGE 

This year marks the close of a half-century of notable achievements. From 
a community school opening with twenty-one students on January 5, 1887, in 
a one-room building, the institution has grown into a junior college of wide 
reputation, known especially for its loyalty to fundamental Christian principles. 
In material equipment it has now a thirty-two-acre campus with eleven buildings, 
valued at $425,000, approximately. On October 15 we have 426 high school and 
college students, or approximately sixty more than last year on the same date. 
All standing indebtedness against the institution, save a small balance due by 
the Convention on the purchase price, has been paid and current bills are met 
promptly. With a rich heritage in equipment and friends, and with an en- 
viable reputation for providing well-rounded educational advantages, the ad- 
ministration faces the second half-century confidently. For many evidences of 
the full cooperation and moral support of the General Board of the Baptist 
State Convention and Secretary Huggins, we are deeply grateful. 

Outstanding developments during the past Convention year includes : 
(1.) New Department of Home Economics. This is one step in a pro- 
gram of vocational training to meet the needs of our constituency, largely ru- 



80 N, C. Baptist State Convention 

ral, for a fuller life. Registration in this department for the first year numbers 
forty. 

(2.) Campaign for $250,000 as Golden Jubilee Foundation for Endowment 
and Expansion, celebrating fiftieth anniversary. 

(3.) Religious emphasis. A major objective for the year is to direct stu- 
dents in a re-study of Christian principles as applicable to campus activities and 
subsequent life. 

(4.) New Teachers: Miss Mary Eliason, M.A., University of North Caro- 
lina, replacing Miss Evelyn Snider, on leave of absence; Miss Elma Black, 
M.A., Duke University, replacing Mrs. L. B. Reavis ; Miss Amanda K. Mar- 
tin, B.A., and graduate student of University of Tennessee, Home Economics ; 
Mr. Falk Johnson, M.A., Wake Forest, teacher of English, replacing Mr. Zon 
Robinson; Rev. Norfleet Gardner, M.A., Th.M., Bible, replacing J. F. Black - 
mon, resigned. B. P. Marshbanks, formerly Dean, has been made Business 
Manager; Mr. R. L. Poplin succeeds Mr. Marshbanks as Dean. 



Annual of Session 1936 



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82 X. C. Baptist State Convention 

3. Our Debts 

We are again grateful that we can report a substantial reduction in our 
educational debts. In 1935 we reduced the principal indebtedness by $38,000. It 
is expected that we shall reduce the debt in 1936 in the amount of about $50,000. 
We do not give here a full report as the auditor's account of the Debt Service 
Fund for the calendar year 1936 will appear in the Minutes of the Convention 
when they are printed. 

On December 1, 1936 the Convention will owe about $800,000. This is huge, 
but it will be recalled that at one time the debt was nearly $1,200,000; and in 
1932 and 1933, at the depth of the depression, the debt was about $950,000. 

We are happy to report also that steps have been taken and progress has 
been made toward a rearrangement, or refinancing, of our indebtedness so as to 
secure a lower rate of interest. We believe that this Convention should 
authorize and instruct the General Board and the Trustees of Meredith College 
to do all things that may be necessary to refinance our indebtedness so as to 
provide for a lower interest rate and to work out a plan of yearly payments so 
that all institutions and agencies may share in the program. We must not forget 
our obligations to our creditors, but at the same time we must not forget our 
obligations to the present generation. 

132. V. DEPARTMENT OF BENEVOLENCES 

R. T. Vann, Secretary 

A. RELIEF AND ANNUITY BOARD 

Aided during the past year, ministers 78 ; 

widows 66 — Total 144 

Dropped for cause during the year none 

Declined for cause none 

Died — men, 11 ; widows, 4 — Total 15 

On roll October 1, 1936— ministers, 67 ; widows, 62 — Total 129 

On waiting list 8 

Amount received from North Carolina for Relief 

benefits through the Cooperative Program $5,662.75 

Amount forwarded from North Carolina for this purpose 7,507.66 

Number ministers paying annuities under old plan 14 

Number persons receiving annuities : 

Ministers, from old age, 15; ministers, from disability, 

17 ; widows, 20 — Total 52 

These received during the year a total of $22,000.00 

Under two or three later Annuity Plans, seventeen, including missionaries, 
are now receiving pensions through the Relief Board. 

The above tabulation gives practically all necessary information as to the 
Board's relief work in the State and a few items with regard to its annuity 
operation. 

For the whole South, the Board aided last year 1,065 ministers and widows 
together with about 150 children. As usual, our State received from the Board 
more than it contributed. The average allocation for a whole year amounted 
to — guess what ? Around $70.00 ; not a month, but a whole year. And who 
are these men and women receiving this pitiful dole? They were all set apart 
according to what Baptists regard as the Scriptural plan namely, under the 
authority of Baptist churches to preach the Gospel and serve those churches. 



Annual of Session 1936 83 

Are they all worthy of assistance? Maybe not, but before any applicant is 
taken en for relief he must answer and sign on a printed form 38 questions 
on every conceivable fact bearing on the applicant's worthiness. Similar ques- 
tions are sent to the widows. 

This blank when properly filled out, must be signed by the applicant and his 
pastor, and then by the Executive Committee of the applicant's Association. 
Finally, if the present writer is not satisfied, he endeavors to investigate doubt- 
ful points by private inquiry. He is grateful to report that in all his years of 
connection with the Board he has found among the hundreds of applicants only 
two doubtful characters. 

From whence does money thus allocated come? From the Cooperative 
Program came last year $42,377.89 from the entire Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion, which alone would have averaged about $40.00 per applicant. But this 
sum was augmented by $17,678.69 from special designations, and $5,917.16 from 
the earnings of small invested funds in six of these states. The balance came 
from the Relief Board's Relief Endowment and Reserve Fund, which amounts 
to $7,512.13, making a total of $73,485.87 for all the needy veterans and their 
widows in the South. This amount, I am told, shows that Southern Baptists 
contribute per capita yearly and not monthly, two cents apiece, one postage 
stamp, for the care of their aged preachers. 

But you must not think that our leaders are satisfied with such a showing 
or that they are making no steps to improve it. After years of disjointed un- 
organized efforts in the several states individually the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention in 1918 organized a General Relief and Annuity Board, which during 
its seventeen years of service has paid out in Relief and Annuity to our veterans 
$2,656,000.82, and meanwhile accumulated total holdings of $4,212,678.89. But 
of this sum only $448,559.64 is available from its earnings for direct relief 
purposes. So discovering several years ago that the funds available for relief 
from all existing sources were wholly inadequate, yielding only $70.00 a year 
for an average allocation, our vigorous, virile and aggressive Secretary, Tom 
Watts, began to devise plans to increase the pittance now given. 

First were the two Annuity Plans, now known as the "Old" and the "New," 
whereby under the former ministers could be relieved from infirmities at the 
age of 68 and receive $500.00 a year, and their widows $300.00. Then came 
the second, the "New Annuity Plan" under which the age of retirement was 
reduced to 65, the general benefits, as I recall, being about the same. Under 
both these plans the minister unaided was to bear his share in creating the 
annuity which with prevailing salaries few pastors were able to do, although 
fifty-two pastors and widows are now annuitant in our state under those plans 
and are receiving yearly a total of $22,000.00. So the Board has devised several 
other plans only two of which — the most practical and promising to my mind 
and apparently to Dr. Watts — I mention here. These are called the "Two 
Contributory Plans." 

Under the former, called the "Service Annuity Plan," the pastor contributes 
2y 2 per cent of his salary and the church 8 per cent. This plan, Dr. Watts 
says, the pastors seem ready to accept but the churches have been very slow 
to undertake the 8 per cent of salary required. However, the plan is being 
pressed and is in operation. In fact, a small membership has been enrolled on 
a completely funded and actuarially sound basis with a small surplus. This 



84 X. C. Baptist State Convention 

amounted, December 31, 1935 to $49,209.59. This plan depends on age, length 
of service and salaries received, so that young men could not hope for full 
annuity at once and older men could not hope to receive much from it. 

The second of these plans, called the "Age Security Plan," which also in- 
volves the cooperation of the pastor and the church, requires that the pastor 
contribute 3 per cent of his salary and the church 3 per cent. Though the 
other plan is preferable of course to pastors, the second, says Watts, "will do 
better for our employees and their families." It is really a modified form of 
the Service Annuity and in some respects is complementary to the Federal 
Contributory Plan. 

It promises more than the latter in these respects : it provides for widow's 
pensions ; for orphans and for permanent and total disability ; and under it the 
annuitant has the privilege of withdrawal of individual dues, none of which 
promises are made by the government. 

It is earnestly hoped that all our pastors and as many of the laymen as 
have opportunity will study the details of these plans as they appear on pages 
223 and 224 of the minutes of the Southern Baptist Convention for 1936. 

There is space here to refer to only one other plan now under operation, 
that of the Gift Annuity, which is open to everybody. The proposed annuitant 
may turn over to the Board any amount, not as a gift but as a purchase price 
of an annuity, the Board to pay an agreed annual income to the annuitant and 
keep the gift after his death. This is a sort of investment which has two 
excellent points : first, the donor's gift is aiding the denomination while he 
lives ; and second, it pays a larger annuity than any other safe investment known 
to the writer. This the Board is able to do because it doesn't have to pay taxes 
on such funds. 

The Board is devoting much attention to plans for annuities to orphanage 
workers, and is considering a workable plan for pensioning workers in all 
denominational institutions. 

133 B. REPORT OF BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

I. G. Greer, General Superintendent 

Again we come to you to render an account of our stewardship. We will do 
this in a brief report of the year's work rather than in an extended discussion of 
child welfare. 

We have had another good year. Not one of your large family of adopted 
children has been taken by death. During the past five years you have min- 
istered to 1,025 children in your immediate family without the loss of a single 
child. Surely this unparalleled record should cause us to pause and lift our 
hearts in gratitude to the Great Physician. Your staff of workers, composed of 
consecrated men and women, have worked together with Him in safeguarding 
the health and lives of these children. They have had the advantage of the 
combined effort of medical science and love cooperating in their behalf. This 
has cost money, but there is not a Baptist in the state who loves the Giver of 
life and humanity that would change the record. 

While we are grateful for the preservation of the lives of the children, the 
Father did call home one of our efficient workers, Mr. T. H. Hilliard, who for 
27 years had looked after the water and lights of the Mills Home. 



Annual of Session 1936 85 

We report with deep sorrow the passing of one of our most loyal and help- 
ful trustees, Mrs. H. B. Moore, of Gastonia. This Convention never appointed 
a trustee who rendered a more unselfish and valuable service than Mrs. Moore 
gave to the Orphanage which she loved. 

Let me pause here to pay tribute to my fellow workers. Never has any one 
been surrounded by a more loyal and cooperative group of men and women. 
During my four years' connection with the institution there has never been the 
least discord to mar the harmony of the work which is our common task. All 
have proven themselves both ready and willing to sacrifice any personal ambi- 
tions or views in the interest of the child in the midst. 

Our farms have yielded a bountiful harvest this year. These crops, supple- 
mented by the generous gifts of produce from our friends will reduce the usual 
large outlay of money for these products. 

Your children have educational advantages equal to any in the state. We 
are offering courses in music, business, home economics and vocational training 
that will enable them to succeed after they have left the home that you are pro- 
viding for them. At the present time 22 of your boys and girls are in college, 
making good. 

The religious life of the Orphanage centers in and radiates from two well 
organized churches, one at Mills Home and one at Kennedy Home. The entire 
support of these churches comes from the membership which is made up ex- 
clusively of the workers and children on the grounds. Last year these churches 
gave nearly twice as much to outside objects as they did for local support. The 
pastors had the privilege of baptizing 146 children. 

North Carolina Baptists should honor the memory of those master builders 
in Orphanage work who inaugurated and defended the wise financial policy 
that we have pursued throughout the years. The once-a-month offerings in the 
Sunday schools, supplemented by gifts of produce and the Thanksgiving offer- 
ings in the churches, has enabled you to care for more children than the Bap- 
tists of any other Southern state. This policy has also made it possible for you 
to accumulate property now valued at approximately one and a half million 
dollars, without a cent of indebtedness except current bills which we hope to 
pay out of the Thanksgiving offering. A policy that has worked so well should 
not be invaded nor abandoned. The fact that once a month the giver has the 
opportunity of contributing directly to the orphan child has not only made 
possible the financial support of the Orphanage, but it has kept alive the spirit 
of giving in the hearts of our people, and stimulated them to support other ob- 
jects as well. As a denomination we should not permit any financial policy to 
obscure the child. 

Our thoughts are now beginning to turn towards the Thanksgiving season. 
It has been necessary to spend heavily this year in order to strengthen the 
physical equipment of your institution. A great Thanksgiving offering has 
never been needed more than it is needed now. Through me more than seven 
hundred children offer you the privilege of enriching your spiritual lives. You 
will, I am sure, accept the challenge, as you have always done, in the name of 
Him who said : "It is more blessed to give than to receive." 



86 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

134. C. NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST HOSPITALS, INC. 

Smith Hagaman, Superintendent 

Profoundly grateful to Almighty God and to its multitudes of friends, the 
Baptist Hospital at Winston-Salem is now closing its greatest year of service 
to sick and distressed humanity. 

During this Convention Year 4,000 patients have entered for treatment — the 
largest number in any year of its history. We have now reached the limit of 
its capacity. We estimate that we would have had a thousand more patients 
this year if we had had room. Of this total number treated 1,800 were part 
pay and free service, that is to say about 45% of patient days were free. These 
patients have come from practically every section of the State. 

At least 3,000 children have been gladdened this year by the return of the 
1,000 Mothers who have been cared for in our hospital. When we take into 
consideration the fact that each patient is in most instances but one of a family, 
then we have directly ministered to 20,000 people, and the further estimate that 
at least fifty kinsmen or neighbors have been anxiously interested in the re- 
covery of each patient : we conclude that the hospital has in a very vital way 
touched the lives of at least 200,000 people this year. 

During the year some changes were made in the personnel of our Staff- — 
Miss Beatrice O'Dell is now instructress in our School of Nurses. Miss Edna 
Heinzerling, who was Superintendent of Nurses during almost the entire life 
of the Hospital, was on account of her health forced to resign, and Miss Ruth 
Council was secured to take her place. 

We have enrolled in our Nurses Training School 32, and the Hospital has a 
staff of 66 well trained doctors and surgeons. 

During the first ten months of the calendar year we have received from 
the Cooperative Program $7,084.20. This was applied to the bonded debt of the 
Hospital. We have received from the Duke Endowment $14,218.00, and from 
Mother's Day Offerings $12,125.02, and still due us from Raleigh from 
Mother's Day Offering $6,000.00. (A more complete report of receipts and 
disbursements will be given at the close of the fiscal year when audit is made.) 

We are pleased to report receipts of quantities of hospital linens furnished 
by the W. M. U.'s and other church organizations. 

During the year we have been able to refinance our bonded debt, thereby 
saving $2,500.00, and a further saving by securing a lower rate of interest. We 
have further been able through favorable consideration of friends to reduce 
local indebtedness in the amount of $13,000. In addition to the above we paid 
on bonds and street assessments $9,276.00 thereby reducing the hospital in- 
debtedness this year in the amount of $24,776. 

We have added this year $2,000.00 worth of new equipment. 

As this report indicates, the hospital is in need of additional patient and 
other space. We are encouraged to believe that we shall have this in the near 
future, and without expense to the denomination. Sick people cannot be placed 
on a "waiting list." 

Our Mother's Day offering is largely the hope of our sick who are unable 
to pay for treatment. We trust that we shall have an enlarged service by our 
W. M. U.'s and other organizations in supplying hospital linen. 



Annual of Session 1936 87 

135. VI. CO-OPERATIVE PROGRAM 

A. DIVISION OF RECEIPTS 

As stated elsewhere in this report, the undesignated money of the Coop- 
erative Program is divided sixty per cent for state objects and forty per cent 
for southwide objects. We have been earnestly hoping that our income would 
increase to the point whereby we could divide fifty-fifty. At the moment we do 
not see that we can make any change in this sixty-forty division of funds for 
1937. Certain negotiations, however, are now pending which may make it pos- 
sible for us to increase the southwide share of the Cooperative Program receipts 
from forty to possibly forty-three or forty-four per cent. In December when 
the General Board meets to plan the work for next year, we shall be able to see 
further than we can now see. With this in mind we think it would be wise for 
the Convention to instruct the Board to raise the percentage from forty to forty- 
three or forty- four if at all possible. 

We must bear in mind, however, that other objects in the Cooperative Pro- 
gram, — all save Debt Service— receive during the year substantial designations. 
In 1935 the several objects received special designations as follows : 

State Missions $28,435.37 

Ministerial Education 1,355.87 

Hospital 16.462.71 

Foreign Missions 58,878.92 

Home Missions 16,511.62 

Ministers' Relief 2,587.97 

These designated amounts were sent to the several objects in addition to 
their per cent of the undesignated money. 

136. B. PROMOTION plans 

We are now in the midst of the most intensive effort we have made in years 
to promote the every member enrollment and canvass of our membership. From 
the mountains to the sea for the past few months we have sounded out the chal- 
lenge, "A Stewardship Revival in Every Baptist Church in North Carolina." 
We have hoped that with all our efforts there would be at least one thousand 
of these revivals held. The blue print of the plan contemplates the assembling 
of the church together for a week of study and meditation on the great themes 
of discipleship, stewardship and missions. We believe now that these revivals 
will be held in more than a thousand churches. We have kept away from the 
use of the term, "Mission Schools," inasmuch as that term fails to convey the 
complete idea which we have had in mind. We cannot get our people to go 
very far in the support of missions and other objects until they have made a 
committal of themselves as disciples and stewards. Moreover, we have urged 
the adoption not only of a worthy budget for the Cooperative Program objects 
but also an enlarged program for the local church. We do this because it is 
our conviction that at the present time fully seventy per cent of our pastors, 
particularly those in the rural churches, are not receiving an income sufficient 
to keep them fit for kingdom service. 

We have tried to sound out the challenge all over North Carolina this fall 
that the time has come for a great advance. By a great advance we mean an 
advance of at least 25 per cent. We know that prosperity has returned to North 
Carolina and that our people can do this if they will. Moreover, we have 



88 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

tried to keep certain definite objectives before the churches. We repeat the 
objectives here : 

1. A Stewardship Revival in each church sometime during the fall months. 

2. The purpose of this revival must be to lead all the members into vital 
touch with the living, reigning Jesus, and then to lead them to make a com- 
mittal of themselves to Him as Disciples and Stewards. 

3. These Disciples and Stewards must be brought to the point where EACH 
one of them on EACH Lord's Day will make a worthy offering — and do it as 
an act of worship — through the Cooperative Program, thus having a share in 
the support of EACH and all objects which Baptists cherish. 

4. These Disciples and Stewards must be led to tithe their income. At 
least let one objective be this, certainly as a starting point. 

"At least a Tithe from at least a Tithe of our resident church membership." 
In preparation for these Stewardship Revivals we have prepared certain 
material which we know is being widely used, (1) A booklet, "Baptist Working 
Together," revised and prepared by the General Secretary; (2) A chart for use 
in the churches; (3) A tract for use in preparation for the every member en- 
rollment with the title, "My Church and I, What Are We For?"; An enroll- 
ment card which challenges each church member to set for himself a program 
of spiritual living and scriptural giving. We know if churches will use this 
material correctly, and if they will major upon discipleship and stewardship 
and a worthy program, that our people will respond in far greater measure 
than they have been doing. 

It will be recalled that the Convention some years ago created a committee 
composed of one member from each association, known as the Committee on 
Promotion and Enlistment. In June of this year this committee had a very 
enthusiastic meeting in Thomasville, covering a two day period and with mem- 
bers present from about fifty associations. At this meeting the promotion 
plans, to which we referred above, were thoroughly discussed and adopted. 
Without going into detail we give here a resolution adopted by this committee, 
and which is now passed on to the Convention for its action. The resolution 
follows : 

Whereas our State Secretary finds it most difficult for him, his associates, 
and representatives of the Convention's institutions, to meet with the asso- 
ciations in annual meeting as they are now scheduled to be held, and Whereas 
we believe it will be most helpful to the work of our State Convention if certain 
associations would change their annual meetings from October to August and 
September and Whereas such a change would be economical both in time and 
money. Therefore be it resolved, that we the State Promotion Committee in 
meeting assembled on this the 10th day of July 1936, at Thomasville, North 
Carolina, do memorialize the Baptist State Convention to request the asso- 
ciations to so adjust the time of the annual meeting as to conform to a schedule 
to be worked out by our State Secretary which will assure our State Workers 
an opportunity of attending a larger number of the annual meetings of our 
associations in the state. 

D. H. Wilcox, 

E. F. Sullivan, 
R. J. Hall, 

Committee. 

At the meeting of the Board in June further steps were taken to provide for 
an intensive effort this fall in an effort to arouse our people to have a share 
in all the program. The plans adopted and carried out provided for a division 



Annual of Session 1936 89 

of the state into five regions. To these regions the general missionaries, M. O. 
Alexander, J. C. Pipes and Charles H. Dickey, together with Mr. Crouch, the 
newly appointed Secretary of Christian Education, were assigned. Moreover, 
the Executive Committee invited Mr. Hugh Johnson, a layman of Raleigh, to 
work in one of the districts during the fall months. These brethren have 
labored unceasingly in the associations and in the churches to provide for and 
hold Stewardship Revivals. 

Thus we have undertaken an intensive and far-reaching program. We be- 
lieve it is going to prove eminently successful. 

We call attention again to the fact that the Cooperative Program, broadly 
conceived, contemplates not only the giving of undesignated money, but pro- 
vides also for special days on which offerings are made for special objects. It is 
true that money given on these special days goes to the object specified, but 
at the same time these special days are observed as a part of our general 
Cooperative Program plan. These special days follow : 

Home and Foreign Missions — Some Sunday in March. 

Hospital — Mother's Day. 

Christian Education — Some Sunday in June. 

Old Ministers' Relief — Some Sunday in August. 

State Missions — Last Sunday in October. 

Orphanage — Thanksgiving. 

These days should be observed in all our churches, and the appeal should 
be made (1) to those who have made a subscription and who are contributing 
systematically. These should not be pressed, but merely asked to make an 
offering, and "over and above," if their hearts prompt them. But what of the 
sixty to eighty per cent of our members who make no pledge at all and con- 
tribute with no regularity? Even in our most progressive churches there is a 
group of twenty-five to fifty per cent of the membership who make no subscrip- 
tions. How are they to be reached for our Mission objects unless these Special 
Days are observed? It is, therefore, suggested that after the Canvass or En- 
rollment is completed a list of those members who will not make a subscription 
be made. We suggest the formation in each church of a Missions or Coop- 
erative Program Committee composed of the following: Chairman, the Superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school ; other members to include the chairman of the 
board of deacons, the president of the W. M. S., the president of the B. T. U., 
and the presidents and teachers of the larger classes in the Sunday school. The 
names of those who made no subscription, or who contribute irregularly, should 
be divided among the members of this committee. Then when the special days 
come each member who has not subscribed should be challenged to do some- 
thing for each of these objects. 

We must undertake a goal next year of at least $500,000 for Cooperative 
Program objects, plus $150,000 for the Orphanage. Surely we are well able 
to do this. For each of the years 1920-1924 inclusive about 300,000 Baptists 
in North Carolina gave nearly a million dollars each year. Surely with 450,000 
Baptists now we ought not to undertake anything less than this goal of $650,000. 
We can do it if we will. It is largely a question of providing a real Stewardship 
Revival in each church and making an honest effort to place a straightforward 
challenge on the heart of each and every church member. 



90 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

137. VII. REPORT OF THE BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

(Owned jointly by the Baptist Sunday School Board, Nashville, Tenn., 

and the North Carolina Baptist State Convention) 

Mrs. Roger Marshall, Manager 

Net sales for the year ending December 31, 1935 amounted to $40,471.51 with 
a net profit of $4,355.21. 

The amount paid out to the two boards owning the Book Store in dividends 
during the year amounted to $2,818.54, one-half of this amount having been 
paid to each board. 

It may be seen from this that the Book Store is operating on a paying basis. 
The total net worth at December 31, 1935 was $15,633.32, with no unpaid bills. 
During the eleven years under the present partnership a total profit of $27,305.92 
has been paid out to both boards. One-half of this amount, $13,652.96, has been 
paid the North Carolina Board, which means that the Book Store is a distinct 
asset and a denominational investment. 

The Book Store handles all supplies for every department of the church, 
as well as a complete line of general and religious books, song books, and 
Bibles. By means of the catalogues at our disposal, we can secure any book 
in print. 

It is our desire to serve North Carolina Baptists promptly and efficiently, 
and we covet your continued patronage and support. 

Write for free catalogues. 

138. 
VIII. REPORT OF THE NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST HISTORICAL 

COMMISSION 

The Commission is glad to report that there are many evidences of an in- 
creasing interest in matters of Baptist history in the State. Many churches are 
celebrating their centennial anniversaries which are made occasions for papers 
on the history of the churches ; these are often prepared with much care and are 
valuable contributions to our history. 

Important additions continue to be made to the "North Carolina Baptist 
Collection" in the library of Wake Forest College, which has now become one 
of the largest and most valuable libraries of Baptist books, documents and 
records in the world. During the past year 3,247 volumes were contributed to 
the Collection ; of these 627 were donated by Mrs. W. C. Tyree of Oxford, N. C, 
from the library of her lamented husband, and 987 volumes were donated by the 
family of the late Dr. Len G. Broughton from his collection, part of which was 
acquired during his pastorate in London and comprises many rare and valuable 
books. 

It should also be mentioned that to the Collection there have recently been 
added the books and pamphlets on the history of our own and other denomina- 
tions from the library of the late Judge T. M. Pittman, part of it, in accord 
with the desire of her husband, by donation from Mrs. Pittman. Judge Pittman 
had spent a life time of devoted and sacrificial labor in making this collection, 
which was probably the most valuable private library on Baptist history ever 
assembled. 

Scholars and others interested in our Baptist history are making larger use 
from year to year of our Collection. Its importance is indicated by the fact 
that by request a duplicate card catalogue of it has been placed in the Library 
of the University of North Carolina. 



Annual of Session 1936 91 

Your Commission would again urge upon the churches and their clerks and 
pastors the importance of collecting and depositing their church record books 
and documents and published articles and letters in the Collection in the Wake 
Forest College Library where they will be carefully preserved in a fireproof 
building and in steel cabinets, catalogues and made readily available for the 
use of members of the churches and all others who may be interested in our 
history. In this way they could preserve these same records which are now 
in constant danger of loss from fire, vermin and lack of proper care, and which 
cannot often be found when needed. Clerks of Associations are also urged to 
send to the Collection copies of their minutes year by year. Those who write 
sketches of churches also should send copies. These and other donations to the 
Collection should be sent to the Wake Forest College Library, care of Mrs. 

C. C. Crittenden, Librarian. 

139. IX. NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST FOUNDATION 

Theodore S. Johnson, Secretary 

The North Carolina Baptist Foundation on October 1, 1936, was administer- 
ing trusts as enumerated below in the aggregate amount of $133,829.88, a de- 
crease from the sum reported for the previous year of $185.83. This is partly 
accounted for by the fact that the report for this year covers only eleven months, 
and shows a decrease in income received, and therefore of cash income on 
hand, and otherwise by slight changes due to changes in the investments. 

The assets of the Foundation may be classified as follows : 

Real Estate $ 37,753.96 

Meredith College Bonds 7,322.50 

Baptist State Convention Bonds 10,885.00 

Notes secured by Deeds of Trust 46,988.08 

Federal Securities 4,647.47 

Stocks 23,448.00 

Other Bonds 847.80 

Cash Principal Balances 471.39 

Cash Income Balances 1,465.68 

Total Assets $133,829.88 

The following trusts have been administered : 

Donor Designation J'alne Net Income 

W. P. Carter Undesignated $ 900.00 $ 0.00 

Aged Ministers' 

Relief Fund Ministers' Relief 39,776.25 855.00 

Noah Biggs Mission Work 5.247.13 80.00 

Noah Biggs Church Edifice 5,044. 61 160.00 

Noah Biggs Ministers' Relief 2.811.58 135.00 

Noah Biggs Ministerial Education 2,500.00 125.00 

D. P. Bridges State Missions 10.000.00 0.00 

Anonymous Mills Home 1,139.08 0.00 

W. L. Carter Mills Home 1.800.00 0.00 

W. L. Carter Baptist Hospital 1,800.00 0.00 

Susan A. Hurdle . . . Mills Home 10,852.40 0.00 

Gaston Co. Association. .Boiling Springs College 761.00 42.53 

G. H. Church Mills Home and Foreign Missions 8,465.07 195.00 

Ida Y. Rogers Mills Home 24.701.14 1.160.00 

P. D. Camp Ministers' Aid and Education 15.000.00 1.700.00 

Y. M. Whisenhunt State Missions 100.00 0.00 

Nannie L. McLean Ministers' Relief 465.95 27.00 

D. P. Bridges Wake Forest College, Foreign Missions, 

Meredith College 1,000.00 0.00 

Total Income Distributed $4,479.53 

It will be noted from the above list that total income was received and dis- 
tributed to beneficiaries in the amount of $4,479.53, which represents a net 



92 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

return after all expenses of administration of slightly less than 4.3% on the 
value of income producing assets. 

The expenses of administration were as follows : 

Insurance Premiums $ 16.00 

Repairs 35.01 

General Administrative Expense 58.71 

Fiscal Agent's Commissions 217.01 

Paving Assessments 87.86 

Total Expense $414.59 

As shown on the statement of assets, there is on hand as of the date of the 
financial report, $471.59 uninvested cash principal and $1,465.68 cash income 
balance not yet distributed to beneficiaries. 

The last annual Convention authorized the enlargement of the Board of 
Directors, from five to fifteen members, and elected new members to these 
positions. One meeting of the whole Board was held in Raleigh on January 9, 
1936, with six members present. At this meeting, the By-Laws were amended 
to provide for an executive committee of five members, and elected Dr. Z. M. 
Caveness, Chairman, Dr. J. L. Peacock, Mr. J. D. Wilkins, Reverend A. J. 
Smith, and T. S. Johnson to that committee. 

The executive committee has held several meetings through the year, as 
required for the handling of routine matters in connection with the administra- 
tion of these trusts. The members of this committee have given careful atten- 
tion to their duties. 

It is a matter of very great regret that Dr. Z. M. Caveness, who has been 
a Director of the Foundation since its establishment and its Chairman for many 
years, finds it necessary to withdraw his name as a candidate for reelection to 
the Board. His long and faithful service has brought his fine business ability to 
the service of this important trust, and especially, through the years of the 
economic depression, he has meant very much to the progress of the work. He 
richly deserves the sincere thanks of the entire denomination for his fine ex- 
ample of unselfish service. His place will be difficult to fill. 

The Board of Directors of the Foundation will convene on Saturday, Octo- 
ber 24, 1936, for the regular annual meeting. 

From year to year, at the close of this report, the Secretaries and the various 
Boards of Directors have repeatedly urged upon the Convention, and upon the 
Baptists of the whole State, the great possibilities for service which may be 
realized through the means of the Foundation. At the risk of vain repetition, 
we dare again to assert that the Baptists of North Carolina should conduct a 
vigorous and continuous campaign to direct the attention of possible donors to 
the services available and the advantages that undoubtedly accrue to the de- 
nominational interests through the agency of the North Carolina Baptist Foun- 
dation. 

Sixteen years of service proves that through this means trusts will be safely 
and wisely administered, investments and funds will be faithfully handled, a 
reasonably high rate of return be secured, and regular incomes made available 
to the beneficiaries. Small trusts as well as large ones will be given equal 
attention, and, together with others, make an aggregate contribution to de- 
nominational activities, which will be most effective. 

One person, properly qualified, could in a few years secure additional be- 
quests and gifts, the return from which would soon repay the incident expense. 



Annual of Session 1936 93 

We repeat, the Convention should adopt and carry through an aggressive 
support of the Foundation work. 

XI. RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. That the division of undesignated funds as between State and Southwide 
objects be left to the decision of the General Board when it meets in December, 
with, however the instruction to the Board to increase the percentage to South- 
wide funds if it is at all possible to do so ; that the General Board be asked to 
divide the per cent allocated for State objects so as to properly safeguard our 
debt funding commitments and at the same time conserve and promote in the 
best manner possible all our work. 

2. That the Convention authorize the continuance of the work with our 
Negro brethren which has been so auspiciously begun. 

3. That the Convention authorize the continuance of the work among the 
Indians, and if possible inaugurate some work which we may call "A Ministry 
to the prisoners, whether in prison or on parole." 

4. That the Convention authorize the continuance of the work of the general 
missionaries, now being so ably done by M. O. Alexander and J. C. Pipes. 

5. That the work now being done at Oteen, Samarcand and Sanatorium be 
continued ; and that with reference to the work at Oteen we ask the other 
states of the Southern Convention, from which veterans come to the hospital 
at Oteen, to continue their cooperation in the support of Wayne Williams as 
our missionary there. 

*6. On December 31, 1936 the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
will owe bonds and other indebtedness in the amount of about $800,000. 
Of this total amount the bonded indebtedness, about $745,000, is represented 
by serial and sinking fund bonds and notes. 

As now financed our minimum debt requirements for the next five years are 
as follows: 1937, $98,405: 1938, $104,567; 1939, $88,516; 1940. $86,588; 1941, 
$79,540. 

The Board believes we could easily meet this schedule of debt payments. 
However, all the indebtedness carries an interest rate of 6% save two notes 
held by the Wachovia Bank & Trust Company which bear 5%. 

For some months past we have been negotiating in an effort (1) to secure 
a lower rate of interest and (2) to arrange our debt payments, if possible, so 
that we can meet our commitments without serious difficulty and at the same 
time include in our program those institutions which are now receiving 
nothing. 

This Board now comes with the proposal that the Convention authorize 
and instruct the General Board to proceed with the refinancing or rearrange- 
ment of our outstanding indebtedness. The proposal which we present provides 
for a loan from the Wachovia Bank & Trust Company of $350,000, payable 
over a five year period, with an interest rate of 4%, with the principal payable 
through said period of five years as follows: 1937, $60,000; 1938. $65, TOO ; 
1939, $70,000; 1940, $75,000; 1941, $80,000. 

The proposal further provides that the Convention borrow $450,000 from 
the Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Company, or some other source, at an 
interest rate not to exceed 5% per annum, payable over a period not to exceed 
fifteen years, with interest only to be paid during the first five year period, 
and while the loan to the Wachovia Bank & Trust Company is being repaid. 

* Convention resolution of authorization adopted. (See page 41. section 91). 



94 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

At the end of this five year period, and during the subsequent ten year period, 
the Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Company loan, or the loan from other 
source, may be called at such rate as may be agreed upon between the Execu- 
tive Committee of the General Board and such corporation. 

The proposal provides further that the Trustees of Meredith College give to 
the Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Company, or such other loaning cor- 
poration, a mortgage or deed of trust on the physical property of Meredith 
College to secure the loan. 

The proceeds from these two loans will enable the Convention to call all 
outstanding 6% bonds, notes and other indebtedness of the Convention and at 
the same time cancel the present mortgage on Meredith College. 

It is proposed that in the new arrangement the annual payments will be so 
arranged that they can be easily met out of Co-operative Program funds ; 
further that the loans shall be made with the understanding that they are call- 
able at such rate as may be agreed upon after giving of sufficient notice by 
the Convention, said notice not to exceed six months. 

We recommend that the Convention adopt this report, and in so doing adopt 
a resolution authorizing and instructing the General Board and the Trustees 
of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina to do all things necessary 
to perfect the arrangements outlined above, and also authorize and instruct the 
Trustees of Meredith College to give mortgage on the property of the college 
as outlined in the foregoing paragraph ; in addition that the General Board be 
instructed to allocate and appropriate from the receipts and expected receipts 
on January 1 of each year a sum sufficient to pay all interest and principal 
on these loans falling due for the current year ; that for the prompt payment 
of principal and interest the Convention pledge to its creditors that all sums 
thus allocated and appropriated constitute and enjoy a first claim on all 
revenues received or to be received by the Convention, excepting only incomes 
and revenues designated for other special purposes." 

7. Whereas Calvary Baptist Church at Raleigh, North Carolina, now has a 
membership of 146, is in a vigorous and growing condition, and is strategically 
located near the new city auditorium at a place which should be maintained 
for church purposes by the Baptists ; and, 

Whereas, the new Calvary Baptist Church organization has taken over and 
is now occupying the property formerly owned and occupied by Southside 
Baptist Church ; and, 

Whereas this property is encumbered for approximately $24,000 indebted- 
ness due the Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Company; and 

Whereas the church anticipates that it will be able to obtain a refinancing 
arrangement whereby the principal indebtedness will be reduced to $15,000 
to be retired at the rate of $500 annually for the first five years, and $1,000 
annually for the next five years, said indebtedness to bear interest at six per 
cent per annum or less, and 

Whereas the church anticipates that it will be able to pay the principal 
installments as the same mature, but will not be able to pay and discharge the 
interest payments, and have requested the State Board to make interest pay- 
ments during the said ten year period ; and 

Whereas the said church will not be able to effect such refinancing without 
the cooperation of the General Board, and 

Whereas, in the opinion of the General Board the payment of the interest 
charges as aforesaid during the ten years, will be a wise and proper expendi- 



Annual of Session 1936 95 

ture in the interest of State Missions, and can be made out of the current 
annual revenues of the Board or Convention available for State Mission 
purposes ; 

Now, therefore, the General Board recommends that the State Convention 
authorize the payment out of its current annual revenues the interest charges 
accruing on said $15,000 new loan for Calvary Baptist Church as above de- 
scribed in the principal sum of $15,000, upon compliance with the conditions 
above set forth, said interest charges not to exceed $900 per annum. 

Provided, however, that Calvary Baptist Church agree to repay the State 
Mission Board whatever sum may have been expended on said loan in the 
event the church cannot successfully operate and has to be liquidated and sold. 

8. That we set our goal for 1937 at $500,000 for the Cooperative Program 
including both designated and undesignated funds ; that we set our goal for 
the Orphanage at $150,000; and that we ask the cooperation of all the churches, 
together with all their agencies, and all the associations as we attempt to 
reach this objective. 

141. REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

The year 1936 has been memorable in our Woman's Missionary Union his- 
tory because of the Anniversaries that we have observed. 

First, and very important to our constituency was the Fiftieth Anniversary 
commemorating the organization of our Union in Raleigh on January 6. 1886. 
This anniversary was an important feature of the program of our Annual meet- 
ing held in Raleigh, March 10-12. We were fortunate indeed to have with us 
on this memorable occasion Mrs. W\ J. Cox. Treasurer of Woman's Missionary 
Union Auxiliary to Southern Baptist Convention ; Miss Kathleen Mallory, Cor- 
responding Secretary of our Southern Union; Dr. John L. Hill, Editor of Home 
and Foreign Fields, Nashville, Tennessee ; Miss Blanche Sydner White, Corre- 
sponding Secretary W. M. U. of Virginia; Dr. Charles E. Maddry, Correspond- 
ing Secretary Foreign Mission Board, Richmond ; and five foreign missionaries 
— Dr. H. H. McMillan, Soochow, China ; Miss Alda Grayson, Laichow Fu, 
China; Miss Katie Murray, Chengchow, China; Miss Naomi Schell, Tobata, 
Japan; and Miss Lucy Wright, Hwanghsien. China. 

The Fiftieth Anniversary of our organized work marked also fifty years 
of active service of our beloved Mrs. Wesley N. Jones. Since she refused 
reelection she was made President Emeritus for life and we still rejoice in her 
guidance. 

All through the year, the Fiftieth Anniversary of the organization of the 
Sunbeam societies was featured, particularly on the program of our young 
people. An increase in the number of Sunbeam Societies was noted and a 
worthy gift to kindergarten work in Soochow, China, was taken as a special 
objective for the year. 

The Henrietta Hall Shuck Centennial was widely observed in our State. 
Mrs. F. Y. O. Ling, Corresponding Secretary of our Woman's Missionary 
Union work in Central China, was an honored guest at the G. A. House Party 
at Meredith College in June and at the meeting of the Mt. Zion Association 
held in Mt. Pisgah church. Those who were so fortunate as to hear Mrs. 
Ling's tribute to Dr. and Mrs. Matthew T. Yates at this their home church will 
never forget the joy and inspiration of her message. 

The Literature Department of our Southern Union also had an Anniversary 



96 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

this 3 r ear. From a small beginning by Maryland Baptists this department has 
grown until the past year the record showed 1,023,447 free leaflets distributed 
through the State W. M. U. offices; 81,275 stewardship cards, tithing and offer- 
ing boxes; and offering envelopes, $1,045,130. Miss Mallory says: "If asked 
what agency is the chief promoter for the utilizing of this vast quantity of free 
literature the answer should inevitably be the stimulus of the Unions three 
monthly missionary magazines each of which is entirely self-supporting — World 
Comrades with a paid up subscription of 17,697 among Sunbeams, Girls' Auxil- 
iaries and Royal Ambassadors; The Window of Y. IV. A. with a circulation 
of 9,072 ; and Royal Service for Woman's Missionary Societies use through its 
75,562 renewals and new subscriptions as secured in 1935." North Carolina 
women subscribed for 8,365 copies of this magazine. 

Another Anniversary, that of the death of Luther Rice, was observed on 
September 25 in Columbia, South Carolina and at his grave near Pine Pleasant 
church in the Edgefield District. Mrs. Edna R. Harris and Miss Mary Currin 
represented the North Carolina Union on this occasion. Special programs on 
Luther Rice were used in a number of societies. 

An effort is being made to enlist North Carolina women in membership in 
the One Hundred Thousand Club. A goal of 2,000 paid-up memberships during 
1936, and the same number in 1937 is our objective. 

Six scholarships have been given to the Woman's Missionary Union Train- 
ing School in Louisville, Kentucky, and interest has increased in the work of 
our Margaret Fund for aiding in the education of the children of our mis- 
sionaries. 

Twenty-five hundred dollars of the Heck Memorial Offering was given this 
year to the work of Dr. H. H. McMillan in Soochow, China; and $1,000 to Dr. 
J. L. Lake for the leper work on Tai Kam Island. 

There are still many churches that have no Woman's Missionary Union 
organization and we will continue our efforts to enlist these churches. A com- 
parison of W. M. U. and State Convention Minutes show that nearly all of 
the churches that are contributing to missions have W. M. U. organizations. 
Increased emphasis is laid on what we sometimes call our W. M. U. Funda- 
mentals : Prayer ; Study both of the Bible and Missions ; Stewardship — the 
grace of giving; Personal Service — manifestation of Christian Fellowship and 
Soul Winning; and Missionary Education of our young people. No depart- 
ment of our work is more vital than that of our young people. To stimulate 
greater interest each group of organizations has been given special publicity 
through a definite "Focus Week"' devoted to their special needs and activities. 
In addition gatherings have been held in their interest ; the Y. W. A. Camp at 
Ridgecrest, the G. A. House Party at Meredith, and the R. A. Conclave at 
Dunn. Each of these has yielded splendid results both in increased interest 
and deepened spiritual life. We believe that all activity in Kingdom work is 
based on love for Christ and the realization that we have a task committed to 
us by Him. 

"As the Father hath sent me even so send I you." 

Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, President, 

Mrs. Edna R. Harris, Corresponding Secretary, 

Mrs. W. D. Briggs, Recording Secretary, 

Miss Elsie K. Hunter, Treasurer, 

Miss Mary Currin, Young People's Secretary. 



Annual of Session 1936 97 

(This Annual was delayed because Auditor's Report was not available until 
February 9, 1937.— C.B.D.) 

AUDITOR'S STATEMENT 

Mr. M. A. Huggins, General Secretary. Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dear Sir: 

We have audited the books and records of the Convention for the twelve months ended December 31, 
1936, and in the following tabulations we show the Revenue and Expense of the General Fund, together 
with all Cash Receipts and Disbursements for the other funds. 

Exhibit "A" shows the Revenue and Expense of the General Fund, together with the distribution of 
the Revenue after paying expenses chargeable to the undesignated revenue. 

Exhibits "B" to "G", inclusive, show the cash transactions of all other funds for the year, and Exhibit 
"H" is a summary of the net Debt of the Convention on December 31, 1936. 

All Cash Receipts were found to have been promptly deposited in the bank and Disbursements were 
found supported by cancelled checks, invoices, etc., and expenses were properly classified. Our examina- 
tion did not disclose any evidence of irregularities and we believe the funds have been carefully and honestly 
handled and properly accounted for. 

Just below is a summary, not audited, but prepared from the reports of the various institutions, show- 
ing the total of all income for Convention objects for the calendar year 1936. 



INCOME FOR ALL CONVENTION OBJECTS FROM THE CHURCHES 
Calendar Year 1936 

Undesignated $ 252,091.48 

Designated for State Missions 31,246.98 

Designated for Education Debt 520.12 

Designated for Ministerial Education '_ 888.86 

Designated for North Carolina Hospital 18,491.26 

Designated for the Orphanage 136,468.64 

W. M. U. Specials 9,175.54 

Designated for Foreign Missions 58,998. 18 

Designated for Hundred Thousand Club 8,105.92 

Designated for Home Missions 17,040. 54 

Designated for Ministers' Relief 533.57 

Total % 533,561.09 



REVENUE AND EXPENSE— GENERAL FUND 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1936 Exhibit "A" 

Revenue: 

From the Churches — Undesignated 3 252,091.48 

W. M. U. Specials Sent Direct — See Contra in Disbursements.. _ 9,175.54 

Total Revenue $ 261,267.02 

Expenses Chargeable to Undesignated Revenue: 

W. M. U. Department — Payment on Budget $ 8,267.69 

Salaries Paid: 

Salary of the Secretarv and Treasurer ? 4,249.96 

Salary of the Bookkeeper 1,710.00 

Salary of the Secretarv to the Secretary and 

Treasurer.. . 1,305.00 

Salary of Clerical Assistant — Temporary 446.50 7,711.46 

Traveling Expenses $ 754.52 

Rent of Offices 555.00 

Printing 441.09 

Postage 668.20 

Telephone and Telegraph 121.15 

lanitor 120.00 

Auditing 141.25 

Supplies and Repairs 207.61 

Advertising and Publishing Statements 400.34 

Bonds of Bookkeeper and Treasurer 97.50 

Compensation Insurance 159.54 

Purchase of Automobile 3 13. 95 

Expense of Board Meetings 526.51 

State Papers Exchange 12.00 

Funeral Design 5.15 



98 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Promotion: 

Salaries $ 5,296.50 

Traveling Expenses 2,687. 16 

Postage 116.95 

Advertising 175.58 

Literature 400.08 

Printing 836.70 3 9,512.97 

Bank Service Charges 188.62 

Total Expenses Chargeable to Undesignated Revenue 3 30,204.55 

W. M. U. Funds Sent Direct — See Contra in Receipts 9,175.54 

Grand Total of Expenses 3 39,380.09 

Distributable Balance of Revenue After Expenses Are Paid 3 221,886.93 

Distribution to Other Funds: 

Southwide Objects 40% 3 88,800.75 

State Missions 13% 28,860.25 

Education — Ministerial Aid 1% 2,220.01 

Education— Debt 42% 93,125.85 

North Carolina Hospital 4% 8,880.07 

Total Distributions to Other Funds 100% 3 221,886.93 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— SOUTHWIDE OBJECTS FUND 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1936 Exhibit "B" 

Receipts: 

Share of the General Fund 3 88,800.75 

Funds Designated for Hundred Thousand Club 8,105.92 

Funds Designated for Foreign Missions 3 46,907.55 

Funds Sent Direct for Foreign Missions — See Contra- 

in Disbursements 3 12,090.63 3 58,998.18 

Funds Designated for Home Missions 17,040.54 

Funds Designated for Ministers Relief 533.57 

Total Receipts .- 3 173,478.96 

Balance from Last Year 48,734.73 

Total to Account for 3 222,213.69 

Disbursements: 

Paid on Undesignated Funds 3 101,129.77 

Paid on Designations for Hundred Thousand Club 7,682.69 

Paid on Designations for Foreign Missions 3 45,979.39 

Funds Sent Direct for Foreign Missions — See Contra 

in Receipts 3 12,090.63 3 58,070.02 

Paid on Designations for Home Missions 17 ,008 . 22 

Paid on Designations for Ministers Relief 486.60 

' Total Disbursements 3 184,377.30 

Balance Due South-.cide Objects December 31, 1936 3 37,836.39 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— STATE MISSIONS FUND 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1936 Exhibit "C" 

Receipts: 

Share of General Fund 3 28,860.25 

Funds Sent Direct to Oteen — See Contra in Disbursements 874.27 

Designated Funds 19,603.06 

Baptist Foundation 275.00 

Baptist Sunday School Board 7,146.05 

Estate Funds 342.60 

Chowan Preachers School 10.20 

Dividend from Biblical Recorder 54.00 

Profit from Baptist Book Shop 1,795.57 

Sale of Baptist Histories 42.40 

Mens Meetings 171. 22 

From Biblical Recorder for Special Work 300.00 

Truett Fund Designations 632.61 

Total Receipts 3 60,107.23 

Balance from Last Year 12,763.35 

Total to Account for 3 72,870.58 



Annual of Session 1936 99 

Disbursements: 

Sunday School Department: 
Salaries: 

Mr. Perry Morgan $ 225.00 

Mr. L. L. Morgan 2,350.00 

Miss Bessie Morgan 1, 140. 00 

Mr. W. Perry Crouch 900.00 $ 4,615.00 

Traveling Expenses 611.46 

Printing 271.39 

Postage 551.00 

Office Rent 192.00 

Incidentals 260 . 66 

Sunday School Convention 251 . 17 

Total Sunday School Departmint $ 6,752.68 

Baptist Training Union Department: 
Salaries: 

Miss Winnie Rickett. __g 675.00 

Miss Mabel Starnes 1,290.00 

Mrs. J. E. Tharrington 1,140.00 

Mrs. W. Perry Crouch • 600.00 $ 3,705.00 

Traveling Expenses 728.73 

Printing 243.28 

Postage 457.81 

Office Rent 252.00 

Incidentals 178.95 

Convention Expenses 1.50 

Summer Workers 200.00 

Total Baptist Training Union Department $ 5,767.27 

Other Disbursements: 

State Convention Minutes and Recording Secretary $ 1,364.43 

State Mission Day Program 374.64 

Annuities — Spilman, Bridgers and Linkhauer 494.84 

Preachers' School 1,066.63 

Negro Workers — Special Appropriation 1,183.59 

Indian Missionaries 1,630.32 

Regular Missionaries 19, 198 . 62 

Special Missionaries 3,303.53 

Rural Workers for Eastern & Western North Carolina. 3,135.20 

Upkeep of Student Cottage at N. C. C. W 472.93 

Student Workers.. 1,618.54 

Salary and Traveling Expenses — Recorder 

Representative 2,025 .06 

Church Buildings 7,895.00 

Vacation Bible School 214.00 

Student Retreat 19.74 

Luther Rice Literature 63. 00 

Truett Place 2,806.54 

Reading Circle — Postage and Rent 178.84 

Men's Meetings 311.33 

Pittman Estate . 100.00 

Insurance on Office Equipment 12.20 

Oteen Worker 605.00 

Total Other Disbursements . . $ 48,073.98 

Funds Sent Direct — See Contra in Receipts 874.27 

Total Disbursements I 61,468.20 

Balance December 31, 1936 $ 11,402.38 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— MINISTERIAL AID FUND 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1936 Exhibit "D" 

Receipts: 

Share of the General Fund $ 2,220.01 

Designated Funds 888.86 

Total Receipts $ 3,108.87 

Balance from Last Year 1,077.01 

Total to Account for $ 4, 185 .£ 



100 N. C. Baptist State Convention 

Disbursements: 

Paid to Wake Forest College g 1,900.00 

Paid to Mars Hill College 475.00 

Paid to Wingate College 250.00 

Paid to Campbell College 250.00 

Paid to Boiling Springs College 240.00 

Total Disbursements $ 3,115.00 

Balance December 31, 1936 $ 1,070.88 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— EDUCATION DEBT FUND 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1936 Exhibit "E" 
Receipts: 

Share of the General Fund $ 93,125.85 

Designated Funds 520. 12 

Centennial Campaign Pledges 1.40 

Borrowed Money 383,500.00 

Sale of Bonds Owned 3,100.00 

Bonds and Accrued Interest Sold to Sinking Funds and Cancelled — 

242.S50.00 Par Value . 38,420.08 

Total Receipts $ 518,667.45 

Overdraft from Last Year 29, 73 3. 37 

Total to Account for _ __.g 488,934.08 

Disbursements: 

Bonds Purchased— 336,800.00 Par Value